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GENEALOGY   COLLECTION 


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HISTORY 

OF 


Otter  Tail  County 


MINNESOTA 


ITS  PEOPLE,  INDUSTRIES  AND  INSTITUTIONS 


JOHN  W.  MASON 

Editor 


With  Biographical  Sketches  of  Representative  Citizens  and 
Genealogical  Records  of  Many  of  the  Old  Families 


VOLUME  II 


ILLUSTRATED 


1916 
F.  BOWEN    &   COMPANY,  Inc. 
Indianapolis,  Indiana 


CONTENTS  J-148894 


VOLUME  I 

CHAPTER    I— RELATED    STATE    HISTORY 33 

A  Portion  of  Minnesota  Originally  Included  in  Louisiana  Purchase — In- 
dian Cessions  and  Treaties — Territorial  Government  Established — 
Boundaries — Governor  Alexander  Ramsey — First  Territorial  Legislature 
— The  Historic  Council  with  the  Indians  at  Traverse  des  Sioux — The  Treaty 
— Indian  Hunters  Cause  Trouble — Townsite  Speculation — Constitutional 
Convention — First  State  Legislature — Admission  of  Minnesota  as  a  State — 
Aid  to  Railroads — Financial  Stringency — Unrest  Among  the  Indians — Mas- 
sacre of  1862— Punishment  of  the  Indians— Subsequent  Treaties— A  Period 
of  Rapid  Development — Trouble  Because  of  the  State  Issue  of  Railroad 
Bonds — Settlement  of  the  Question  and  Activity  in  Railroad  Building — Di- 
versified Farming  Interests — Population  Statistics — Military  Record — Name 
—Geography  —  Area  —  Rivers  —  Lakes— Elevations— Climate— Chronological 
Record  of  the  State. 

CHAPTER  II— GEOLOGY  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY 57 

Situation — Area — Surface  Features — Natural  Drainage — Lakes — Topography 
—Altitudes— Soil— Timber— Geological  Structure— Aboriginal  Earthworks 
— Prehistoric  Mounds  and  Relics — Capt.  John  Pope's  Trip  Through  Otter 
Tail  County  in  1849 — "The  Garden  Spot  of  the  Northwest." 

CHAPTER  III— OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY  IN  1860 82 

Map  of  the  County,  1860 — Boundaries — A  Peculiar  History  During  the  De- 
cade, 1858-1868— Character  of  the  Early  Settlers— Early  Religious  Services- 
Land  Office — Surveys — Otter  Tail  City — The  First  Trader  and  Other  Early 
Merchants — Villages  in  the  County — Copy  of  the  Census  Return  for  Otter 
Tail  County,  1860 — Waseata  Postoffice — Its  Census  Returns — Farm  Statistics. 

CHAPTER  IV— ORGANIZATION   OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY 94 

Territorial  Act  Defining  the  County — Changes  in  Boundaries — Origin  of  the 
Name — Formal  Organization  of  the  County — Southern  Influence— -Otter  Tail 
City,  the  County  Seat — Early  Settlers — Exodus  from  County  Because  of 
the  Indian  Outbreak — Changes  in  Boundaries — First  Commissioners — 
— County  Seat  Changes — Legislative  Enactments — Final  Removal  to  Fergus 
Falls — E.  E.  Corliss — Range  44  Attached  to  the  County — A  Peculiar  Legal 
Case  Pertaining  Thereto — Proposals  to  Divide  the  County — Otter  Tail  City 
in  1858 — Population  Statistics— Platted  Townsites — Financial  Statement  of 
the  County  for  1915 — Naturalized  Citizens  of  Otter  Tail  County — Naturaliza- 
tion Laws — Births  and  Deaths. 

CHAPTER   V— COUNTY    BUILDINGS 119 

Court  Houses— The  Present  Court  House— The  First  Tail— The  Present  Jail 
— County  Tuberculosis  Sanatorium — County  Poor  Farm. 


CONTENTS. 

(  HAPTER   VI— OFFICIALS  OF  THE  COUNTY 138 

First  Meeting  of  the  County  Commissioners — Salaries  of  First  Officials — 
Legislative  Enactments  Relating  to  County  Officers — Commissioners — Coun- 
ty Auditor — Treasurer — The  First  County  Tax  Receipt — Banks  as  Deposi- 
taries of  County  Funds — Register  of  Deeds — Sheriffs — County  Attorneys — 
Coroners — Surveyors — County  Superintendent  of  Schools — William  M.  Cor- 
liss— District  Judges — Judge  of  Prohate — Clerk  of  the  District  Court  — Presi- 
dential Elections — Otter  Tail  County  in  the  Legislature — State  and  National 
Officials  from  Otter  Tail  County. 

CHAPTER     VII— LEGISLATIVE     ACTS     BEARING     ON     OTTER     TAIL 

C(  >UNTY    159 

State  Burdened  with  Peculiar  Special  Legislation— A  Summary  of  the  Gen- 
eral and  Special  Acts  Relating  to  Otter  Tail  County  from  1858  to  the  Present 
Time. 

CHAPTER  VIII— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  1868-69 165 

Townships  Settled  in  Groups — Four  Principal  Languages  in  the  County — 
Difficulty  in  Naming  the  Townships — Chronological  List  of  the  Townships  in 
the  County — Historical  Mention  of  the  Townships  of  Clitherall.  St.  Olaf. 
Tumuli.  Tordenskjold,  Aurdal — Villages  of  Dalton  and  Parkdale. 

CHAPTER   IX— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL   COUNTY,   1870 177 

Townships  of  Parkers  Prairie,  Dane  Prairie,  Fergus  Falls,  Eagle  Lake,  Eliza- 
heth.  Otter  Tail.  Pelican.  Erhards  Grove,  Buse — Villages  of  Parkers  Prairie. 
Elizabeth.  Otter  Tail  and   Pelican  Rapids. 

CHAPTER  X— TOWNSHIPS   OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY.   1871 1% 

Townships  of  Rush  Lake.  Aastad,  Hobart.  Scambler,  Maine.  Nidaros — Vil- 
lages of  Richville.  Hobart.  Clitherall  and  Vining. 

CHAPTER  XI— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY.  1872-73 208 

Townships  of  Perham,  Effington.  Norwegian  Grove,  Western.  Deer  Creek. 
(  Iscar,  Trondhjem,  Gorman — Villages  of  Perham.  Deer  Creek  and  Luce. 

CHAPTER  XII— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  1874-77 22$ 

Townships  of  Leaf  Mountain.  Friberg,  Compton,  Eastern,  (  )ak  Valley,  \\  ood- 
side,  Newton — Village  of  New  York  Mills. 

I  II  \l'l  ER  XIII— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,   1878-79 238 

Townships  of  Sverdrup,  Inman,  Henning,  Bluffton,  Lida,  Amor.  Dora.  Everts, 
Leaf  Lake — Villages  of  Underwood,  Henning,  Bluffton  and  Battle  Lake. 

CHAPTER   XIV— TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,   1880-81 253 

Townships  oi  Candor,  Star  Lake,  Elmo,  Dunn,  Maplewood,  Homestead, 
Carlisle.  Eoldcn   -Village  of  Vergas. 

CHAPTER    \\     TOWNSHIPS  OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  1882-97 262 

Townships  of  Edna,  Girard,  Paddock,  Pine  Lake.  Otto,  Butler,  Corliss, 
Blowers,  Orwell,  Dead  Lake     Village  of  Dent. 

CHAPTER    XV]      rRANSPORTATION  ...     274 

Highways     River    Transportation     Red     River     Navigable     Stan-      Ud     for 
Roads  and  Bridges      Presenl  Road  Conditions     State  Highway  Commission 
Railroads— Early    Resolutions    renaming  to  the   Need   of— Building  of  the 
Roads— Local    Voti    oi    Countj     Ud     Present    Roads     Removal   of   Railroad 
Shops  from  Fergus  Falls. 


CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER    XVII— AGRICULTURE    297 

Influence  of  Topography  on  Development  of  Agriculture  in  Otter  Tail 
County — The  County  Characterized  by  Small  Farms — Character  of  Settlers- 
Table  of  Farm  Products,  by  Decades — Live  Stock  Statistics — Dairy  Interests 
— The  Grasshopper  Pest — Bumper  Crop  of  1895 — The  Grange  Movement — 
Farmers  Clubs  and  What  They  are  Doing — Co-operative  Elevators — Mutual 
Fire  Insurance  Companies — Fair  Associations  and  Agricultural  Societies — 
County  Agricultural  Agent — County  Farm  Bureau — Elements  Contributing 
to  the  Progress  of  Agriculture. 

CHAPTER   XVIII— BANKS    AND    BANKING 309 

The  First  Banks  in  the  County — A  Study  of  Banking  Conditions  in  Fergus 
Falls — Banks  of  the  County,  with  Date  of  Organization — Brief  Sketch  of 
Each  of  the  Banks. 

CHAPTER   XIX— THE    PRESS    330 

First  Newspaper  in  the  County— Brief  Mention  of  the  Various  Papers  Which 
Have  Existed  in  the  County — Legal  Newspapers  of  the  County — The  Ameni- 
ties of  the  Press. 

CHAPTER  XX— THE  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY   BAR 350 

High  Character  of  the  Legal  Profession— Splendid  Personnel  of  the  Otter 
Tail  County  Bar— Distinguished  Members— A  List  of  the  Attorneys  of  the 
County,  with  the  Date  of  Their  Settlement. 

CHAPTER   XXI— THE    MEDICAL   PROFESSION 353 

No  Physicians  in  the  County  Prior  to  1871— Dr.  R.  M.  Reynolds,  the  First 
Physician  in  the  County— The  Various  Schools  of  Practice— A  List  of 
Physicians  Who  Have  Regularly  Practiced  in  the  County — Osteopaths  and 
Chiropractors— Dentistry— Optometrists— George  B.  Wright  Memorial  Hos- 
pital—St. Luke's  Hospital— State  Hospital  for  the  Insane. 

CHAPTER  XXII— CHURCHES   OF  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY 363 

A  List  of  Ministers  Registered  in  Otter  Tail  County— A  Brief  History  of 
Each  Church  in  the  County— The  Federated  Church  in  Fergus  Falls— First 
Congregational  Church— First  Presbyterian  Church— Other  Presbyterian  and 
Congregational  Churches— Swedish  Evangelical  Lutheran  Churches— German 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Trinity  Church— Norwegian  Evangelical  Lutheran 
Church— Bethel  Lutheran  Church— Bethania  Norwegian  Lutheran  Church- 
Norwegian  Evangelical  Lutheran  Churches— Hauges  Evangelical  Lutheran 
Church— Evangelical  Free  Church— Methodist  Episcopal  Churches — Swedish 
Baptist  Churches— Baptist  Church— People's  Union  Church— Episcopal 
Church— Zion  Church— Finnish  Apostolic  Lutheran  Congregation— Pente- 
costal Church  of  the  Nazarene— Reorganized  Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of 
Latter  Day  Saints— Christian  Science  Society— Catholic  Churches— Finnish 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Churches— United  Brethren  Churches  -Scandinavian 
Churches— Immanuel  Churches— Swedish  Baptist  Churches— Miscellaneous 
Churches. 

CHAPTER    XXIII— FRATERNAL    AND    BENEVOLENT    SOCIETIES 410 

Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons— Independent   Ordei    Id   Fellows — 

Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Klks — Royal  Arcanum — United  Com- 
mercial  Travelers     Knights  of  the   Maccabees     Ladies  of   the    Maccabees 

Brotherhood   of  American    Yeomen — Modern    W limn   of     America      Royal 

Neighbors  of  America— Knights  of  Pythias  -Catholic  Order  of   Forest 


CONTENTS. 

Degree  of  Honor — Independent  Order  of  Foresters — Fraternal  Order  of 
Eagles. 

CHAPTER    XXIV— EDUCATION    423 

Inefficiency  of  Early  Schools,  Due  to  Unavoidable  Conditions — Unanimity  in 
the  Building  Up  of  a  School  System — Petitions  for  Schools — First  County 
Superintendent  of  Schools — Sketch  of  a  Pioneer  School — Development  of  the 
Educational  Work  of  the  Count}- — Introduction  of  the  Study  of  Physiology 
and  Hygiene  and  the  Results — State  Aid  to  Standard  Schools — School  Sta- 
tistics— County  Superintendents — Assistant  Superintendents — Schools  of 
Fergus  Falls — Park  Region  Luther  College — Northwestern  College. 

CHAPTER  XXV— TELEPHONES   IN  OTTER  TAIL   COUNTY 439 

The  County  Quick  to  Install  the  New  Invention  in  the  Eighties — Its  General 
Use  and  Importance  to  the  Community — A  Brief  History  of  the  Companies 
Doing  Business  in  Otter  Tail  County. 

CHAPTER    XXVI— CREAMERIES    459 

A    History   of   all   the    Creamery    Companies    Doing   Business   in   Otter   Tail 

County. 

CHAPTER  XXVII— MILITARY  AFFAIRS 468 

Veterans  of  the  Civil  War  Residing  in  Otter  Tail  County — The  Spanish- 
American  War — Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution — Grand  Army  of  the 
Republic — Woman's  Relief  Corps. 

CHAPTER   XXVIII— POSTAL   HISTORY   474 

Fergus  Falls  Postoffice — Other  Postoffices  in  the  Count}- — Salaries  of  Post- 
masters— Rural  Free  Delivery. 

CHAPTER   XXIX— CITY    OF    FERGUS    FALLS 4/9 

James  Fergus,  the  Founder  of  the  City — Joseph  Whitford.  the  First  Settler 
on  the  Townsite— The  Sioux  Massacre  of  1862— Ernest  Buse,  the  First  Per- 
manent Settler — George  B.  Wright,  and  His  Influence  on  the  Early  Growth 
of  the  Place — Fergus  Falls  in  1873 — Pioneer  Advertisers — Fergus  Falls  in 
1871 — Water  Power — Incorporation  as  a  Village — First  Election — Village 
Boundaries  and  First  Officials — Council  Proceedings — Railroad  Bonds — 
Amendments  to  the  Village  Charter — First  School  District — Becomes  the 
County  Seat — Early  Lack  of  Railroad  Facilities — Presidents  of  the  Village 
Council — Incorporation  as  a  City — Fergus  Falls  in  1881 — Lincoln  Avenue  vs. 
Bismark  Avenue — Municipal  Affairs — City  Charters — Gas  and  Waterworks 
—Fire  Department— Electricity— Otter  Tail  Power  Company— The  City  Dam 
and  Its  Destruction — Hoot  Lake  Project — Police  Department — Streets.  Side- 
walks, Bridg  Parks.  Etc. — Care  of  the  Poor — City  Funds — 
Libraries — Clubs  and  Organizations — Commercial  Club — Town  Improvement 
Society — Park  Region  Anti-Tuberculosis  Society  Street  Railways — City 
ials — Fergus  Falls  in  1916 — Directory  oi  Present  Business  and  Profes- 
sional Inter- 

CHAPTER   XXX— REMINISCENi   I  S  OF  OTTER    l\li.  (  OUNTY,  1869-72..  536 
Story  by  Ole  Jorgens,  of  His  Settlement  in  Otter  Tail   I  inven- 

iences  of  the  New  Settlers— First   Visit  t<  Elected   to    Public 

Office— Taking    the    Census    Under    Difficulties— First    Mail    Route     I 

Sti  er — Traveling  in  the 

Early  Days— First  Workings  and  Fish  Laws     A  Ninety-Dollar 

Christmas  in  Otter  Tail  County— A  Deer  Fight— Bootlegging— 


CONTENTS. 

Assessing  of  Taxes  in  1870 — First  Insanity  Case  in  the  County — The  Grass- 
hopper Scourge — Fourth  of  July  Celebration,  1870 — First  Bridge  in  Fergus 
Falls — Two  Interesting  Early  Letters. 

CHAPTER    XXXI— REMINISCENCES    OF    THE    EARLY    HISTORY    OF 
OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY  5S6 

E.  E.  Corliss  Tells  in  an  Interesting  Way  of  the  Beginnings  of  Things  in 
Otter  Tail  County — The  Journey  to  the  Promised  Land — Otter  Tail  City  in 
1858— Breaking  New  Land— Clitherall— The  Mormons— The  Settlers  in  1870— 
A  Judicial  Court  Run  by  Prayer — Highway  Robbery — The  First  District 
Court — Craigie's  Mill — Organization  of  the  County — Attempted  Organization 
of  Holcomb  County— Acquisition  of  Range  44 — Wilkin  County  in  1872 — 
Fergus  Falls  Made  the  County  Seat — Removing  the  Records — Legislative 
Changes — Pioneer  County  Officials — Some  Early  Settlements  and  Settlers- 
Edmund  A.  Everts. 

CHAPTER  XXXII-REMINISCENCES   BY  JOHN   W.   MASOX 575 

The  Coming  to  Fergus  Falls— A  Callithumpian  Serenade— "Hanging  Out  the 
Shingle" — Early  Mails— The  "Good  Old  Times"  in  Comparison  with  the 
Present — A  Visit  by  Celebrities — "Lord  Gordon" — Casus  Belli — The  Grave- 
yard—The New  Church— The  Church  War— A  Fondness  for  Bonds— "Old 
Settler"  to  the  Front — Repudiation — Charter  Amendments — The  School 
Record— Bribery  and  Corruption— Political  Schemes— The  Waterworks 
Scheme — Major  Beach's  Telegraph — The  Rat  Skin  War — The  Dam-site  at 
Guttenberg — Mistaken  Identity — What  Can  Be  Done  with  a  Dime — The 
Stage  Robber — The  Fergus  Falls  Vigilantes — A  Romance  and  a  Tragedy — 
Luedke  vs.  Luedke — The  Lo-cus(t) — A  Sad  Tale  with  a  Happy  Ending — The 
Fergus  Falls  Cooking  Club — The  Village  Baker — The  Esthetic  Side  of 
Fergus  Falls— The  R.  R.  S.  W.  N.  Co.— A  Dash  of  Local  Color— "What's  the 
Matter  with  Fergus" — The  Captains  of  Industry  at  Play. 

CHAPTER  XXXIII— WHO'S  WHO    IX   EARLY   FERGUS 648 

Doctor  Goodale — James  M.  Gray — Levi  Sartwell — Victor  Landquist — Bill 
Wilson — Bert  Melville — Jim  Spendlove — Jacob  Austin — Capt.  H.  S.  Cole — 
Sam  H.  Nichols — Frank  Hoskins — Opperman,  a  Dutchman — Edwin  M. 
Wright— Charles  William  Kaddatz. 

CHAPTER  XXXIV— SIDELIGHTS  OX  OTTER  TAIL  HISTORY 675 

Why  Otter  Tail— The  Tale  of  the  Otter  Tail— Origin  of  the  Name  of  Otter 
Tail  County — A  Complete  History  of  Otter  Tail  County  in  1874 — The  Fergus 
Falls  Land  Office  and  Otter  Tail  Democracy — Reminiscences  of  Fergus  Falls 
—George  B.  Wright's  Story— The  Story  of  Knut  O.  Harris— Story  of  G.  O. 
Da-hl— Story  of  T.  A.  Huff— Great  Indian  Scare  of  1876— Prairie  Fire— Gold 
in  Otter  Tail  County — First  Law  Firm  in  Fergus  Falls. 


HISTORICAL  INDEX 


VOLUME  I 


A 
Aastad   Township — 

Altitude    66 

Boundaries    201 

Churches    376 

Crops    301 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Natural  Features  201 

Officials    . 201 

Organization    167.   200 

Population    111 

Taxpayers    1870.    201 

Telephones  451 

Aboriginal  Earthworks 75 

Average   of   crops   298 

Advertisements,     Early-day    331 

Agricultural    Agents    306 

Agriculture    297 

Almora   113,  311,  328 

Altitudes  in  the  County (>2 

Altitudes  in  the  State 47 

Altoona  (Vergas)  113,  254 

Amenities  of  the  Press 344 

American   Yeomen   415 

Amor    Township — 

Altitude   65 

Boundaries   246 

Churches   384 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Creamery    467 

Location    246 

Mounds    76 

Name    246 

Officials    247 

Organization 167,  246 

Population    111 

Soil    67 

Telephones 454 

Ancient   Free  and   Accepted   Masons  410 

Animal    Productions    298 

Area  of  the  County 57 

Area  of  the  State  46 

Assessing  of  Taxes 1870.  548 


Attorneys    350 

Auditors,    County   144 

Aurdal    Township — 

Altitude   66 

Churches   381.  384,  402 

Commissioners'    District    141 

First   Events  176 

Natural  Features 175 

Officials   176 

Organization 167,  175 

Population   HI 

Settlement    176 

Telephones     452 

Austin.   Jacob    655 


Balmoral   

Banks  and   Banking 

Banks  as  Tax  Collectors  - 

Baptist  Churches 

Bar  of  Otter  Tail  County 


Parley    

Battle   Lake- 
Altitude    

Banks 310. 

Churches 376,  396,  402.  403, 

Creamery    

Election,   First   

Fair    

Incorporation    

Location    

Newspapers    

Officials  

Physicians     

Plat    113, 

Population    

Beauty    Shore    113, 

Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 

Elks    

Benevolent  Societies 

Better    Farming    Association 

Births    in    County   


[1STI  IRICAL    INDEX. 


Blowers  Township — 

Altitude    65 

Commissioners'  District 141 

i  lection,   First   271 

Name  271 

Natural    Features    271 

Officials    271 

Organization 167,  271 

Population    111 

Telephones    446 

Bluffton— 

Altitude    62 

Banks 311,  337 

Business    Interests   244 

Churches  408 

Creamery    459 

Election,   First   244 

Incorporation    244 

Location    244 

Lodges   417 

Newspapers  343 

Officials 244 

Physicians    355 

Plat  113.  244 

Population 111.  244 

Bluffton  Township- 
Altitude    65 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Election,  First 243 

Highways    278 

Location 243 

Natural  Features  243 

Organization 167,  243 

Population    110,    111 

Boardman   113,    235 

Bonita    83,    85 

Bootlegging,    Early    548 

Boundaries   of   County   82 

Bridge,    First    in    Fergus    Falls 552 

Bridges    278 

Brotherhood  of   American    Ye< 

rnest    4*2.  582 

Bu  -     ["ownship — 

Utitude  66 

Commissioners'    District  141 

Election,   First   194 

Highways    278 

Natural  Features 195 

Officials  195 

i  ation 167,  I'M 

Population    111 

Railways  195 

Settlement    195 

Telephom  s     451 


Sutler    Township — 

Altitude   65 

Churches     393 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Location    269 

Natural  Features 269 

Officials 269 

Organization 167.  268 

Population    HI 


11,1 

M7 

Candor  Township- 

65 

Commissioners'    District   __ 

141 

Natural    Features    — 

253 

Organization 

167, 

253 

111 

Care  of  the   Poof 

136 

Carlisle 113, 

260,  311, 

445 

Carlisle  Township — 

66 

301 

Commissioners'  Distr 

icts 

141 

Election,  First 

Joil 

76 

Natural    Features   — 

26C 

?60 

Organization 

167, 

260 

Population    

.110, 

111 

?m 

4S1 

589 

Cathcart  and  N.  P.  Rail 

[way 

538 

Catholic   Churches 

389, 

407 

Catholic    (  >rder    of    F< 

420 

Census    of    the    County. 

I860— . 

86 

Cessions  of  Land  bj    Indians  - 

36 

Charter    Amendments   - 

595 

358 

Christian   Science    Soci 

ety    ____ 

388 

Christmas,    \   Pioneer  - 

546 

Chronology   of    Minn,  sota 

4') 

Church    of     fesus    Christ    of    Latter 

Day    Saints    

363, 

388 

,o> 

468 

113 

•04 

of   the    District 

151 

(lunate    of     Minnesota 
Clitherall— 

48 

Altitude    

63 

HISTORICAL    INDEX. 


Clitlierall — 

Banks 311,  326 

County  Seat 98,  119 

Churches 403 

Incorporation    206 

Officials    206 

Oldest  Village  in  County 206 

Physicians    355 

Plat 113 

Population   112 

Schools    424 

Settlement   206,  559 

Telephones    447.  451) 

Clitlierall  Township — 

Altitude   65 

Character  of  Pioneers 169 

Churches   409 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Mormons 168 

Name  169 

Officials    170 

Organization    167,  169 

Population    110,  111 

Settlement    168 

Cole.   Capt.    H.   S.   659 

Commissioners,   County  99,   138,   149,    141 

Commissioners'  Districts 141 

Compton  Township — 

Altitude    65 

Churches   394.  395 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Highways    278 

Location   230 

Name    230 

Natural    Features    230 

Organization 167,  230 

Population  110,  112 

Railroads    230 

Soil    66 

Telephones    456 

Congregational   Churches  __  369,  371,  399 

Constitutional    Convention,  1857 38 

Co-operative  Elevators 303 

Corliss,  E.  E. 

..100,  102,  270.  285.  351,  42.5.  427.  540,  556 
I  orliss   Township — 

Churches    404 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Mills   270 

Name    270 

Nationality  of  Residents 270 

Natural  Features 270 

Organization  168,  269 


Corliss  Township — 

Population   110.  112 

Settlers   270 

Corliss,  William   M.  150 

Corn    298 

Coroners    148 

County   Agricultural   Agents   306 

County   Attorneys 148 

County   Auditors   144 

County  Boundaries 82 

County    Buildings    119 

County  Commissioners  —99.  138.  140.   141 

County  Fairs 303 

County   Finances   114 

County  Officials 138 

County   Officials,   Pioneer   570 

County   Poor   Farm    136 

County    Sanatorium    133 

County  Seat  Location 542 

County   Seat,    Removal    of   569 

County  Supt.  of  Schools 149.429.  433 

County  Surveyors 149 

County    Treasurers    144 

Court  House  History 119 

Craigie.  James  G. 545.  607 

Craigie's  Mill  562 

Creameries  459 

D 
Dahl,  G.  O. 688 

Dairy     Statistics    299 

Dalton— 

Altitude   64 

Banks    311,  326 

Churches 386 

Creamery   466,  467 

Incorporation  173 

Location    173 

Lodges   419 

Officials    173 

Physicians  355 

Plat    113,  173 

Population 112 

Dam-site  at  Guttenberg 600 

Dane   Prairie  Township — 

Altitude    66 

Churches  397 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Natural  Features 179 

<  Irganization  ii>7.  178 

Population    111.  112 

Taxpayers,    1869 179 

Telephones      453 

Daughters  of  the    V.m<  i  ican   Re\  1  8 


HISTORICAL    INDEX. 


Dayton    Hollow   89 

Dead  Lake  Township — 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Election,    First   273 

Natural    Features    275 

Organization 168.  273 

Population    112 

Deaths   in   County   117 

Deer  Creek — 

Altitude    63 

Banks  310,  323 

Business    Interests   223 

Churches   223 

Creamery    463 

Incorporation   222 

Location  222 

Newspapers    343 

Officials 223 

Physicians    355 

Plat  113 

Population 113 

Telephones 456 

Deer   Creek   Township- 
Altitude    65 

Churches  397.  398,  405 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,  First 221 

Farm   Improvements   221 

Highways   277 

Natural  Features 222 

i  iffii  ials  222 

Organization 167,  221 

Population    110,  111,   112 

Soil   66 

Deer  Fight 547 

Degree  of  Honor 421 

Dent- 
Banks  331.  325 

Business    Interests   263 

Churches    407 

Growth 263 

Incorporation   263 

Influence  of  Railroad 263 

I  od  jes  411,  416 

Officials    263 

Physicians    355 

Plat     113 

Population 113 

Survey    263 

Telephones    447 

Dentistry    358 

Deposits  of  County  Funds 146 

Depredations   by    Indians    37 

District  Judges 150 


Division,  Acts  of HID.   108 

Division   of    County   541.  5l>7 

Doctors 353 

Dopelius    115.  257.  466 

Dora  Township — 

Altitude   65 

Churches    399,  400.  407 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Location    247 

Natural    Features    247 

Officials   248 

Organization    167,  247 

Population    112 

Drift   Deposits  73 

Dunn   Township — 

Altitude   66 

Churches  397 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Name  256 

Natural    Features    257 

Officials   257 

Organization 167,  256 

Population 112 

Soil    66 

E 

Eagles,   Fraternal    Order   of   422 

Early  Bootlegging 548 

Early   Settlements 571 

Eastern  Township — 

Altitude 65 

Churches   574 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election.   First  250 

Location   230 

Mills    231 

Officials   231 

Organization     1"7,  250 

Population    112 

Telephones  448 

Eagle   Lake  Township — 

Altitude   65 

Churches    394,  398 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Election,   First  181 

Geology  70 

Natural    Features    181 

Organization    167.   181 

Population    111.  112 

Earthworks,  Prehistoric 75 

Echota   83.    85 

Edna   Township — 

Utitude  65 

Commissioners'    District    141 


1ST0RICAL    INDEX. 


Edna  Township — 

Election,    First  262 

Name  262 

Natural   Features   262 

Organization    167 

Population 112 

Railroads    263 

Education  423 

Effington  Township — 

Altitude   65 

Churches    393,  398 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Early    History   214 

Election,  First  210 

Growth  of 215 

Highways  278 

Name   217 

Natural  Features 211 

Officials   218 

Organization    167,  210 

Population    111,  112 

Settlement  211 

Telephones    447.  455 

Election   Precincts,   First   140 

Elevators,   Co-operative  303 

Elizabeth- 
Banks  311,  325 

Business    Interests   182 

Churches    182,  373,  390 

Creamery    4l>0 

Incorporation   182 

Location  182 

Officials    183 

Physicians   355 

Plat    113,  182 

Population    112 

Schools   183 

Telephones   445 

Elizabeth   Township — 

Altitude    66 

Churches    408 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Description    182 

Organization    167.  181 

Population    111.  112 

Telephones    445 

Elks.  Order  of  412 

Elmo    Township — 

Altitude    65 

Boundaries    255 

Churches 402 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Election,  First 255 

Location,   First  255 


Elmo  Township — 

Natural   Features   256 

Organization 167,  255 

Population  112 

SoU  66 

Elmwood    113,  253 

Episcopal    Churches    386 

Erhard — 

Banks  311,  328 

Churches   371 

Creamery   466 

Location  194 

Plat    113 

Telephones    445 

Erhards  Grove  Township — 

Altitude   66 

Boundaries    194 

Churches 41)5 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Highways 278 

Natural  Features 194 

Officials  194 

Organization    167,  193 

Population 111,   112 

Evangelical  Association 397,  408 

Evangelical  Free  Church 382 

Evangelical   Lutheran   Churches  381,  396 

Evangelischel   Zion   Church 408 

Everts,   Edmund   A.   573 

Everts    Township — 

Altitude    65 

Crops  301 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Mounds    76 

Name  248 

Natural   Features  248 

Organization  167,  248 

Population    112 

Soil  67 

F 
Fairs 303 

Farm    Bureau    307 

Farm  Crops 298 

Farmers'  Alliance 302 

Farmers'   Clubs  303 

Farming  Interests 297 

Federated    Church    367 

Fergus    Falls    Cooking   Club 619 

Fergus    Falls — 

Advertising.   Pioneer  487 

Altitude    63 

Ami-Tuberculosis  Society 525 

Banks    309,  311 


HISTORICAL   INDEX. 


ergus    balls — 

le    First   522, 

Business   [nterests,  1871  

Business    [nterests,   1881    

Business    Interests,   1916  

Charters    160 

Churches    

374,  381,  382,  38S,  388,  396, 

City  Dam 

City   Funds  

1  Organizations 

Clubs   

Commercial  Club 

Cooking   Club   

I  ount:    Seat 102,  119,  160,  285, 

Creamery    



Esthetic  Side 

Fair    Association   

Fire    Department    


First    Village   Election  

Founding    of    

Gas   Works  

vth    of    

I  lospitals  

In   1873  

In  1881  

Incorporations    162,  489, 

Indian    Massacre    

Land   Office   

Law  Firm,  First 

Libraries    

Lincoln  Ave.  vs.  Bismark  Ave 

Literati,    the    

Lodges  410,  41.'.  419,   I 

irs    . 

Municipal   Affairs  

Newspapers 

1    i   ah  

Parks   

P        ciai         

Platted    



Pi       I      I     f 

Population 110,  111, 

li-tory 



Railroad    History  286, 

Reminiscences 

ips 

1    District    

!      ord  


•    492,  595 



515 

515 

277 

526 

514 

439 


-    balls — 

643  Schools    

487  Settlers,   First   .   . 

497  Sewerage  

531  Sidewalks  

595  Street    Improvements  

Street   Railways  

405  Streets    

512  Telephones    

516  Town  Improvement  Society 

520  Vigilantes   

520  Village    Boundaries   

523  Village  Charter 

619  Village    Council.   Acts   of 490. 

492  Village   Council.    Presidents  of— 

463  Village  Officers,  First 

510  Water   Power 488, 

625  Waterworks     

315  Who's    Who  

508  Fergus    Falls   Township — 

510  Altitude   

489  I   rops    

471'  Description    

506  Commissioners'    District   

500  Natural    Features   

360  Officials 

486  Organization    167, 

497  Population  111, 

495  Taxpayers,    1870  

481  Telephones    445. 

679  Fergus  Falls  Vigilantes 

693  Fergus.    James    

516  Financial    Statement   of   County 

500  Finnish     Vpostolic    Luth.    Church... 

625  Finnish    Evan.    Luth.    Churches   

471  Flax    

505  Folden  Township — 

503  Altitude 

330  Churches    

527  missioners'    District   

512  Flection,    First    

515  I  I  ■■'  

353  Officials  

113  anization    167. 

514  Population    

515  Foresters,   Catholic   Order  of 

112  Foresters,  Independent  Order  of  — 

474  Fourth   of   July.   1S70  

'■11  Fox    Park       

295  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles 

683  Fraten  

295  Free   Christian    Church   

492  Friberg  Township— 

595  Utitude    


HISTORICAL   INDKX. 


Friberg   Township — 

Churches 399,  404 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Name   229 

Natural    Features    229 

Officials 230 

Organization    167 

Population    110,   111,  112 

Telephones 444 

G 

Game  and  Fish  Laws 545 

Geography   of   the   State 40 

Geology  of  the  County 57,     67 

German  Evangelical  Churches 404 

German  Evan.  Luth.  Church 374 

Girard   Township — 

Altitude  65 

Boundaries 267 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Crops    301 

Mounds 96 

Natural    Features    267 

Officials 267 

Organization    167,  267 

Population  112 

Soil  67 

Gold  Excitement 228 

Gold  in  Otter  Tail  County 693 

Goodale,   Doctor   648 

Gorman  Township — 

Altitude  65 

Churches 401 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,   First  225 

Name   226 

Natural  Features 226 

Officials    226 

Organization 167,  225 

Population  111.  112 

Soil 66 

Surface    67 

Grand   Army  of  the   Republic   471 

Grand  View  Heights  113 

Grange,  the  302 

Grasshoppers   300,  550 

Graveyard  War  590 

Gray,  James  M.  648 

H 

Hanging  of  Indian  Murderers 42 

Harris,    Knut    O.    687 

Hay  299 


Henning— 

Altitude    63 

Banks   310.  320 

Business  Interests 243 

Churches    243,  406.  409 

Creamery    4b5 

Election,   First 242 

Incorporation 242 

Location    242,  243 

Newspapers   343 

Officials  243 

Physicians    355 

Plat    •_ 113,  242 

Population    112,  243 

Telephones    455 

Henning   Township — 

Boundaries  241 

Churches   373 

Commissioners'   District   141 

Election.   First  241 

Name  241 

Natural  Features 241 

Officials  242 

Organization  167,  241 

Population    112 

Railroads   242 

Telephones    449 

Highways   274 

Hill   View   265 

Hobart    113,  202 

Hobart   Township — 

Altitude  65 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,   First  202 

Natural    Features    202 

Officials   202 

Organization    167,  202 

Population   111.  112 

Settlers    202 

Soil    66 

Holcomb    County   100,-160,  565 

Homestead   Township- 
Altitude    65 

Commissioners'  District   141 

Election,   First  259 

Natural   Features 259 

Officials 260 

Organization   167 

Population  112 

Hoot   Lake  Project 514 

Hoskins,    Frank 664 

Hospital  for  Insane 361 

Hospitals   360 

Huff.  T.  A 690 


HISTORICAL    INDEX. 


I 

Indian    Hunters   Cause  Trouble 37 

Indian    Massacre  of  1862 41 

Indian  Scare  of   1876 690 

40 

Indian-     !  I  I  42 

[dlewood 113 

Immanuel    Churches    400 

Independent   Order  of  Foresters  __.  421 
Independent   Order  of  odd   Fellows  411 

Indian  Treaties 33,   35.     42 

[nglewood  113,  248,  249 

nts   of   the   County.    1860 86 

Inman  Township — 

Altitude 65 

Commissioners'    District    141 

I  1.  i  tion,  First 240 

Favorable    Influence   of    Railroads  240 

Mills   241 

Name    240 

Natural    Features   240 

Officials    241 

ation 167,  240 

Population    112 

Insane    Hospital    361 

Insanitj    Case,    First    in   County 540 

Insurance   Companies  304 

J 

Jail    History 129 

Jail.   Moving   of  to   Fergus   Falls 546 

Jasper  Township  161 

i  lie   536 

Judges,    District 150 

Judges   of    Probate   151 

K 
I;  irli  s  W.       -     .. 
74 

Killarney   Beach  113,  2?7 

Knights  of    Pythias  120 

Knights  "i  the  Maccabees  415 

L 

es     415 

Lake     Mason    113 

the   County   58 

I.ak.s  ..t"  the  State  ...     47 

Land   O!:.  |  Palls   679 

Landowners,  1860 —    91 

Landquist,  Victor  651 

Latter    I  lay    Saints..        363,388 

- -  350 

83 

— - -    70 


I  ,i  ai    Lake  Township — 

Aliunde 65 

Churches    395 

i  .  iiimii  trict   141 

Election,    First   250 

Early  History 250 

Natural    Features    250 

Officials --       252 

Organization 167.  250 

Population  112 

Railroads 252 

Soil    66 

Surface 67 

I  .en   Mountain  Township — 

Altitude    65 

Churches 390.  397.  401 

Commissioners'    District    141 

I  lection,    First   22S 

Gold    Excitement  228,  693 

Natural    Features   22S 

(  Irganization  167,  228 

Population    111.  112 

Soil   66 

1  eafside    114 

Legal    Newspapers    345 

Legislative    Acts    Hearing   cm    Otter 
Tail  County 94.  97.  99.  107,   15" 

Laphani   83 

ive    Changes   570 

Legislature.    Members   of   the 153 

lire,    State.     First     38 

Legislature.   Territorial   35 

Lid. i  Township 

Altitude    66 

.  ii  in  rs'  1  (istricl  141 

I  arlj    Business  Interests 245 

Mills  245 

Name  -  245 

Natural    Features    245 

.u  ion --    167 

Population    ..     112 

Live    Stock    298 

Livestock     Associations   304 

Lockport  83 

410 

Lord  Gon  — -    —188,  588 

Luce — 

I'.iMiii^    Interests   227 

I    i  eamery    461 

Incorporation   226 

Location  -.-  —       22" 

Plal    .._. 114 

..     112,  227 

Luedke  vs.  Luedke,  Case  of  609 


HISTORICAL    INDEX. 


M 

Maccabees,  Knights  of 415 

Mail   Rubbery.  Early 554 

Mail    Route,    Early   540 

Mail    Service    477 

Maine  Township — 

Altitude    66 

Churches    205,  400.  407 

Commissioners'   District   141 

Election,   First   204 

Lodges    416 

Name    204 

Natural    Features    204 

Officials   205 

Organization    167.  204 

Population 111,  112 

Schools   426 

Settlement 204 

66 

449 


Soil   

Telephones    

Maplewood  Township — 

Altitude  

Churches  396,  397,  406, 

Commissioners'  District 

Name   

Natural    Features   

Officials  

Organization 167, 

Population 

Marion   

Mason,  John   W.    434,  485, 

Masonic    Order    

Massacre  of   1862 41, 

Medical    Profession    

Melville,    Bert   

Methodist     Episcopal    Churches  382. 

Midland    Beach    114. 

Midway    Park   

Military  Record  of  the  County 

Military  Record  of  State 

Mill     Park    

Mills    .___  229.  231,  233.  241.  245,  270, 

Ministers,   Registered  

Modern  Woodmen  of  America 

Moraines   

Mormons 363,  388. 

Mounds   

Muskrat    Skins   

Mutual   Insurance  Companies 

N 

Name  of  the  County 

Name  of  the  State 

Names    Of    Townships    


Natural   Drainage   57 

Naturalization   Laws  115 

Naturalized    Citizens    115 

Navigation  of   Red   River   275 

New    York    Mills- 
Altitude  63 

Band 236 

Banks    310,  323 

Business    Interests   237 

Churches    237.  395 

Creamery   465 

Fair    305 

Fire   Department 236 

Incorporation   236 

Lodges    237 

Newspapers  243 

Officials    237 

Physicians    355 

Plat    114,  236 

Population 112,  23b 

Telephones    455 

Newspapers 330 

Newton   Township — 

Altitude  65 

Boundaries 235 

Churches    394 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Creamery  467 

Election,  First 235 

Name   234 

Natural   Features   235 

Organization    167,  234 

Population  110,  112 

Taxpayers,   1870  235 

Nichols,   Sam    H.   663 

Xidaros  Township- 
Altitude  65 

Boundaries    205 

Churches  402 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,   First  205 

Growth   205 

Highways    278 

Officials    205 

Organization   167 

Population    111.  112 

Soil  67 

Ninety-Dollar   Story   545 

Nirvana  114.  207 

Northwestern   College  373.  437 

Norwegian    Evan.   Luth.   Church 375 

Norwegian   Grove  Township — 

Altitude   66 

Churches  379.  400,  4(>l 


HISTORICAL   INDEX. 


Norwegian  drove  Township — 

Commissioners'    District   141 

on,  First 218 

Natural    Features   218 

Officials 219 

Organization    167,  218 

Population 111.  112 

Postoffices    219 

Timber    67 

.in     Lutheran     Church 376,  401 

an   M     E.  Church  405 

O 
Oak    Valley    Township — 

Altitude  65 

Boundaries    252 

Churches   400,  408 

Creamery  460 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Xatural    Features    252 

Officers    232 

Organization 167,  231 

Population   110,  112 

Oats  298 

Odd  Fellows  411 

Officials  of  the  County 138 

Officials,  Pioneer  County 570 

"Old  Settler'' 593 

Optometrists 359 

Organization  of  the   County 94 

■•  ■  hip — 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Flection.   First   272 

Landowners,    1880    272 

272 

Natural   Features 272 

273 

ation 168,  271 

Population  112 

ncs  444 

Osars  74 

(  (scar  Township— 

Vltitudes  66 

Boundaries 224 

Churches    224.  379,  406 

Commissioners'    District    141 

in,  First   223 

Mounds   76,  224 

lis    224 

<  Organization    105.  167,  225 

Population     111,  112 

_ 

■nes    -.  445.  449 

iliy    358 


I  ftter  Tail   City- 
Business  Interests,  1860 84 

t  .uli    .tit   ami    X.    I'.    Ky. 538 

Census,  1860 86 

Churches  400 

County    Seat    

—.99,  119,  120,  160,  285,  541.  5-4.  569 

Decline  of   109 

Early    Market   Prices  331 

First    House 558 

In  1870 554.  557 

Land  Office  84 

Location  677 

Newspapers  330 

Plat 114 

Railroad  History 285,  538 

Religious  Services,  First 83 

Otter  Tail   County   in   1860 82 

Otter   Tail   County  in   1874 679 

Otter  Tail  Lake 57 

Otter  Tail.  Origin  of   Name 675 

Otter   Tail   Township- 
Altitude   65 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,   First  185 

Mounds  75 

Xatural  Features 184 

Organization    167.  183 

Population    110.   111.   112 

Soil    66 

Summer  Resorts 185 

67 

1   184 

(  liter    Fail   Village— 

Banks    511.  527 

ss  Interests 185 

hes   185.  404 

ery    

[ncorpora!  on    185 

Officials 185 

114.  184 

•ion   112 

i  >tto  Township- 
Altitude  65 

Boundaries  268 

Churches 268,  387 

Commissioners'    District  141 

on,    First    

Location 267 

Name  267 

officials    268 

<  Irganization   167,  267 

I'  ^illation   112 


HISTORICAL   INDEX. 


P 
Paddock  265 

Paddock   Township — 

Altitude   05 

Churches    266,  394 

Commissioners'   District   141 

Election,    First    205 

Location  265 

Natural   Features  265 

Officials 266 

Organization 167 

Population  112 

Park  Region  Luther  College 435 

Park-dale 64.   114.  173 

Parkers   Prairie — 

Banks  310,  320 

Churches   374.  401.  406 

Fairs 305 

Lodges 411.  416 

Nationality  of  Settlers 571 

Newspapers   343 

Officials 178 

Physicians 1 355 

Plat 114 

Population 113,  178 

Settlement    571 

Survey 178 

Telephones  446.  450.  456 

Parkers   Prairie  Township — 

Altitude   65 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Location  177 

Name  Changed 161,  177 

Natural    Features    177 

Organization 107,  177 

Population    110,  111,  112 

Soil  67 

Telephones    448 

Pelican  Rapids- 
Altitude  63 

Band  192 

Banks    310.  318 

Business   Interests    193 

Churches 399,  405,  408 

Creamery 462 

Fair 305 

Fire  Department 190 

First  Events 189 

Founding  of 187 

Incorporation   187 

Light  and   Power 191 

Location  186 

Lodges  420 

"Lord  Gordon" 187 


Pelican  Rapids — 

Mails  190 

Newspapers 342 

Officials 191.  193 

Physicians     555 

Plat   114,  186 

Population  113 

Railroad    History    292 

Settlement    189 

Telephones    453 

Pelican   Township — 

Altitude   66 

Churches    402 

Commissioners'    District   141 

Location   186 

Mounds   76 

Natural  Features 186 

Organization 167,  186 

Population 111,   112 

Soil  66 

Pentacostal  Church  of  the  Nazarene  388 

People's   Union   Church  385 

Perham — 

Altitude   63 

Banks    310,  321 

Business  Interests 209 

Churches   404,  405,  408 

Creamery 465 

Fair 305 

Hospital    209 

Incorporation   162 

Lodges 412 

Newspapers 342 

Officials    209,  210 

Physicians 355 

Plat    114,  209 

Population  113,  209 

Public  Utilities 209 

Schools    209,  305 

Telephones  456 

Perham   Township — 

Altitude 65 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Location  208 

Mounds    76.    77 

Natural  Features 208 

Organization 167.  208 

Officials 209 

Population 110,   111.  113 

Soil    66 

Surface   67 

Physicians    353 

Pine    Lake   Township — 

Altitude    


HISTORIC  Al.    IM'l  \. 


Pirn    I  ake    1  •  >w  nship — 

Commissioners'  District 

Name    

Natural    Features   

<  ifficials  

(  Irganization    167. 

I '"1  Milan. hi   

Railroads 

Pioneer  Christmas  

Pioneer  County  Officials 

Pleasure    Park    

Political    Schemes    

Poor   Farm  

Pope.   Capt.   John.    Investigations- 
Population  of  the  State  

Population  Statistics 

Postal    History   

Potatoes    

Prairie  Fire 

Prairies    

Presbyterian    Churches    370. 

Present  Court  House 

Present  Road  Conditions 

Presidential    Elections   

Press,  Amenities  of  the 

Press,  the 

Propi  ;  t  \    Statistics,  1860 

Provan  Beach 114. 

Pythias,    Knights  of 


R    R    S.  \Y.  X.  Co 

637 

Railroad     Bonds 

38 

'81 

M  105,  I-." 

565 

568 

Rat-skin  War 

5Q9 

Red  Eye  ...     

>6S 

Red     River 

57 

488 

Red  River  Navigation  --- 

275 

-i    1  lei  ds 

146 

R<  lati  d  Stati    History 

33 

Religious   1  ><  w  m 

363 

Reminiscences — 

Busi  ,  Ernest . 

48? 

1      E.   

556 

G    i  i     

688 

M.n  i  is,   Knut   (). 

687 

Huff,  T.  A. 



.,<*! 

W. 

575 

Wright,   <  ■■         i      ' 

..  485. 

- 

685 

Represenl 

153 

I  »r    R     \1 

I860 

Ki, 

Richdale  114.  267,  398 

Richland 

Richville— 

Banks    311,  325 

Business  Interests 200 

Churches    405 

Creamery   461 

Incorporation   _.     __     „    .__     200 

Location   199 

Lodges  412 

Newspapers 343 

Officials    200 

Plat 114 

Population 200 

Telephones    454 

River  Transportation 275 

Rivers  of  the  County 57 

Rivi  i  -  of  the  State 46 

Road  Conditions,   Present 278 

Rothsay o4.  465 

Royal   Arcanum   414 

Royal   Neighbors   of    \merica  A]') 

Rural    Free    Delivery 478 

Rush   Lake  Township — 

Altitude    __      ._.    __      65 

Ubrecht,  father  Joseph 197 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Mounds 7t> 

Officials  199 

Organization 167.  196 

Population 111.  113 

Soil   67 

Surface 67 

Rushville    113 

Rye .  2'<'» 


St.   Luke's    Hospital    - 361 

St.   Olaf  Township— 

Altitude   66 

Churches   171,    397,   400,   4-15 

Commissioners'    District    141 

I  lection,  First 171 

Location 171 

Name 171 

Natural    Features    171 

als  171 

ation  167,  170 

Population    110.  111.  113 

Si  hools 171 

Sanatorium,    County    133 

Sartwell,  Levi  650 

Si  ambler  Township 

Altitude  -         -     66 


HISTORICAL    INDEX. 


Scambler  Township — 

■  Churches    204.  385,  402 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Location 203 

Name  203 

Natural    Features   203 

Officials   204 

Organization 167,  203 

Population 111,   113 

Settlement 203 

Soil 66 

Summer   Resorts   204 

Scandinavian   Christian   Church   395 

Scandinavian   Christian    Mission 

Church   396 

Scandinavian   Free  Church  of  God—  396 

School    Record   595 

School  Supt..  County 149.  420,  433 

Schools   423 

Secret  Orders 410 

Senators,  State 153 

Sheriffs    147 

Sidelights   on    Otter   Tail    History__  675 

Situation  of  the  County 57 

Soil   of  the   County   66 

Spanish-American    War 468,  473 

Stage   Robber   603 

Star  Lake  Township — 

Vltitude   -    66 

Commissioners'    District    141 

Election,    First    254 

Name   254 

Natural    Features    255 

Officials     255 

i  Irganization    254 

Population 113 

State  Aid  for  Roads  and  Bridges —  276 

State  History 33 

State  Hospital  for  Insane 361 

State    Military  Record 45 

State   Population  45 

State    Senators    153 

Story  of  the  Steer 543 

Streams   of   the    County 57 

Stuart     Lake     Park 114.  264 

Sunlight    Hills   114,  257 

Sunnyside    114 

Superintendent    of    Schools,     County 

149,  429.  433 

Surface    Features 57 

Surveyors.    County 149 

Sverdrup  Township — 

Aliunde   56 

Churches 382.  398 


Sverdrap  Township — 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,    First  . 238 

Name    238 

Nationality  of  Residents 239 

Natural    Features 239 

Officials 234 

Organization  167 

Population   113 

Taxpayers.    1S78   239 

Swedish  Baptist  Churches 383,  406 

Swedish    Evangelical    Lutheran 

Churches 372,  394 

T 

Taxes,    Assessing  of,   1870 548 

Telephones  439 

Territorial  Government 34 

Timber  of  the  County 66 

Topography     62 

Tordenskjold 98,  120,  160,  540,  564 

Tordenskjold  Township — 

Altitude   06 

Churches   399 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Natural  Features 174 

Name 174 

Officials  175 

Organization 167,  174 

Population 110,  111.  113 

Settlement 174 

Townships.   1868-69  165 

Townships,  1870 177 

Townships,  1871   196 

Townships,   1872-73  208 

Townships,  1874-77 228 

Townships,   1878-79   238 

Townships.  1880-81 253 

Townships.  1882-97 262 

Townsite  Speculation 38 

Transportation  274 

Traveling  in   Early  Days 543 

Traverse  des  Sioux,  Council  at 35 

Treasurers.  County 144 

Treaty  of  Traverse  des  Sioux 35 

Trondjem   Township — 

Altitude    66 

Churches 380,  401,  408 

Commissioners'  District 141 

Election,   First   224 

Organization    105,    167,   224 

Population  111,  113 

Tuberculosis    Sanatorium    133 


HISTORICAL    [NDEX. 


Tumuli  Township — 

Vltitude  66 

es    398 

jsioners'  District 141 

Xante 171 

Officials  172 

Organization   167,  172 

Population  111.  113 

Taxpayers,   1870  172 

U 
i  'od — 

Banks  310,  322 

Churches    : 409,  240 

Creamery 462 

Election,  First 240 

Incorporation 239 

Location  __ 239 

Lodges   418 

Plat    114 

Population    240 

Telephones   454 

United   Commercial   Travelers 414 

V 
Vergas — 

Ranks    

Business  Interests 254 

Churches    404 

Creamery 466 

Incorporated  254 

-    417 

Name  Changed  254 

als  254 

Plal        113,  253 

Population 113,  254 

relepl    mi  4;1 

Vining — 



Business    Interests    207 

Creamery   460 

Incorporation 207 

Location 206 

417 

Plat    114 

ition   113.  206 

117 

W 
Wadena   County  107 


Wall   Lake   176 

Wall   Lake  Point 114 

War  of  the  Factions 589 

War  of  the   Rebellion 468 

Waseata    83,   85,    89 

rks  Scheme 596 

Western  Township — 

Altitude 66 

Roundaries  220 

Churches 

Commissioners'  District 141 

220 

First  Crops 220 

ation  167,  21° 

Population    111,   113 

Settlement    220 

Telephones     444 

Wheat  

Wilkin    County   565,   ;''7 

Wilson.    "Bill" 

Wimer   Lake   Resort 114    200 

Woman's   Relief   Corps i 472 

Woodland 265 

Woodmen,   Modern 417 

W Iside   Township — 

Altitude 65 

Churches 405 

Commissioners'    District 141 

Election,  First 232 

Mill   233 

Name      —     -  252 

I  (fficials   255 

Organization  

Population  113 

Soil    66 

Wright,   Charles   J 631 

Wright,  Edwin  M. 669 

Wright   Family  89 

Wright,  George  B...100,  484,  48! 

Wright   Memorial    Hospital 360 

Wrightstown  232 

Y 

Yaquina  - 114.  275 

Yeomen,  Rrotherhood  of 415 

Z 
urch    


BIOGRAPHICAL  INDEX 


VOLUME 


A. 

\.alberg,    Martin   732 

Aarness,  Ole  A.  542 

Aasncs,  Edward  L.  94 

Adams,   Hon.   Elmer  E. 80 

Adley,  Lafayette   R. 46 

Alberts,   August   852 

Albertson,  Hon.  Orris 863 

Aldrich,  Herbert  S. 477 

Altner,    Robert    935 

Ament,    Jacob    994 

Andersen,    Andrew    147 

Andersen,    Andrew    278 

Anderson,  A.    G.    320 

Anderson,  A.  M.  133 

Anderson,  Andrew    421 

Anderson,  Andrew     653 

Anderson,  Andrew  J. 467 

Anderson,  Carl   539 

Anderson,  Charles    M.   146 

Anderson,  Daniel   221 

Anderson,  Ivar   472 

Anderson,  John   A.   393 

Anderson,  Louis     423 

Anderson,  Ole    627 

Anderson,  Hon.  Peter  A. 47 

Anderson,    Richard    453 

Angus,    Richard   J.   81 

Antonsen,  Gilbert  L. o27 

Antonsen,   Henry 629 

Antonsen,  Otis  A. 1006 

Antonsen,  Walter   C.    628 

Arnold,   Louis 196 

Arvidson,  Andrew  N.  409 

Arvidson,  Hans   N. 360 

Askerooth,  Mons   933 

Aslaksen,  Asbjorn   285 

Atkinson,   Robson   C. 386 

Aune,  Ole  O. 298 

Austin,  Otho  A. 784 

^xness,  Ole 


Baker,  Arthur  D. 648 

Baker,  Axcel  C,   M.  D. 69 

Baker,  Charles     D.    416 

Baker.   Harry 813 

Barcalow,  L.   D.   845 

Barke,  John    O.    62 

Barnard,    Edward   T.    432 

Barr,   John   W.   988 

Barry.   John   941 

Bauck,  August 766 

Bauer,  Joseph 926 

Bayley,  William   P. 66 

Beards,  Cecil 847 

Beck,    William    564 

Beckman,  William 865 

Bell,  James  H.   71 

Bell,  Lysander    W.    774 

Bell.  Watson  T.   79 

Belmont,  Andrew    A.   660 

Bemus.    Vernon    S.   295 

Bengtson,   Nels 641 

Benson.  Martin 256 

Berg,  Carl    351 

Berg,  Christian   E.  109 

Berg,  Hans  P. 106 

Berg,  Ole   301 

Berg,  Ole  A.  623 

Berg,  Ole    W.    385 

Berge,    Henry  H. 433 

Berger,    Jens    P.    535 

Bergerud,    Hans   S.   167 

Bergquist,    Carl    A.   583 

Bergrud,    Anders    A.    209 

Berns,   Jacob    931 

Berthold,   Jacob    L.,    M.   D.   768 

Beske,   Robert  937 

Bickfo'rd,    H.    A.    396 

Billings.  Jesse    P.    141 

Billings,  John    S.   43 

Bixby,  Jacob  S.  684 


HICAL   INDEX. 


Bjorklund,  Trior 226 

Blyberg,  0.  A.  E.      ..  696 

Boehl,  Joseph    407 

ick  E. 303 

Ion     ll.iidor 34 

Boen,  John    E.   506 

Holland.  Dick       405 

B [y,    Ufred    K.   704 

Bondj     Knu(    \V.   512 

Bonlie,  Ole  A.  O 258 

Bottem,    P.    O.    985 

Bowman,   Charles   II.   261 

Andrew   210 

Brandslien,  Otto  J. 159 

Brandt,    Fred  C.  876 

Brandvold,    Knud    H.    136 

on,  Brady 887 

Brekkc,    Halvor   G.   205 

Brendal,  Joseph  P.  153 

John    N.    603 

Samuel   N.  637 

Brown,  David    M.    75 

Brown,   Ira   J.   536 

Brown,  Janus    A.    58 

Harry   X.  737 

Bryant,    Ray    954 

Augustus  R.  883 

Burau,     Herman    794 

Burgess,   Augustus   G.  392 

Burlingame,   Frederick  E. 469 

I  'ana    L.    872 

Burton,  Willard   P.  814 

Buskrud;   Ole   E.  915 

i  halkley  M.  233 

Bye,    John    263 

C. 

Campbell,  George 131 

Carew,  Thomas 779 

Carlson,  John  793 

I  arpenter,  Albert  C. 315 

apt.  Osmer  C. 65 

ough,   Cornelius   G.  888 

ins  C. 366 

Christenson,    Oh      \.    884 

i  Jiristianson,  Anton    856 

I  hristianson,  Charles    921 

Christiansen,  Jens  276 

-on,  Ole  922 

Fn  d  .1.  837 

ii.     I  lenry    1  '.; 

I  ole,  Hoi  M    D.   336 

i  ollins,    Henry    J.    45 

Cook,    Homer    ('.    


Cordes,   Henrj  237 

I  ord.es,   Herman   J.    652 

Corliss.  Arthur    M.    ..    53 

Corliss,  Eben   E.  198 

Cowing,  George  F.       60 

D. 

Dahl,    Andrew    ...       . 908 

Daiker,   Joseph    711 

Dalluge,   Allien  139 

Daly.   M.  J. 284 

Damlo,   Christian   665 

Danielson,  A.   R.   94o 

Danielson.   Carl    L.    982 

Danielson.   Frank  W.   462 

Davis.  David    C.    797 

Davis.  James    795 

DePochee,   Louis   579 

Dertinger,    Michael   910 

Dewey,   William   B. 7\2 

\ndrew    831 

Dinsmore,  John  H. 4Q0 

Doll.   John    246 

Dolsen.    Charles    M.    333 

Duberowski.   John   262 

Duenow,     Herman    949 

Dunker.  Frederick  340 

E. 

Ebersviller,   Nick  538 

Edholm.   Xcls   339 

Eggum,    Christian    

■  He  «  I.  157 

Eichmiller,  Michael 

Eklund,  Alfred  42o 

Eklund,    Charley    302 

Ekstam,    Andrew    461 

Ellwanger,  Albert    286 

Ellwanger,  John 974 

Embertson.   Edward   C.   804 

Emery,    Benjamin    G.   435 

Engebretson,   Arne   206 

Erckenbrack,  Clinton  L.  733 

Erickson,  Cornelius  B. 606 

Erickson,    Erik   W.       530 

Erickson,  Ole    963 

lobn        193 

Erikson,   Martin 

Eriksson,  1  eonard 352 

racob  339 

I    il  lobn  . 616 

I  ssi  ..    lobn.    M.   P  357 

Esterman,    Dominii     I  159 

Evandcr,    Martin    540 


KMiRAIMIICAI.    IXDKX. 


Evanson,   Ed.   K.   971 

Evavold,  Alfred  K. 1007 

Evavold,   Anton    B.   284 

Evavold,   Isaac   K. 1008 

Eveland,   Jacob    C.    204 

Evenson,    Even    S.    679 

Evjen,    Chris    116 

F 

Fabian,     Herman    C.    164 

Fabian,   William  656 

Farnham,   Joseph    H.   881 

Femling,  Fred  A. 485 

Field,    Xicolai   F.   52 

Field,  Xicolai  O 123 

Finn,   Nathan   J.  243 

Fish.    Joseph    612 

Fisk,    Walter   S.    559 

Fiskc,   Clinton    W.   992 

Fiskum,  Jorgen   A.   820 

Fjestad,    Frank 120 

Floen,   Martin   E. 708 

Folkedal,  Spencer 187 

Foss,    Otto    C.    418 

Fossen,    Ole    J.    86 

Frank,    A.    Albert    610 

Frankberg,   Hon.  Erick 853 

Frankberg,   George  W.   59 

Franze.    Ole    J.    554 

Frautschi,   Albert   936 

Frazee,   Charles   R.   697 

Frazee,    Harry   F. 702 

Frazee,  P.  C. 698 

Freeborn,  J.  A..   Ph.   G..   M.   D. 640 

Freeman,   George  F. 422 

Froslee,    Michael    H.    480 

Froslee.  Thorwald  H. ^  528 

Fnrrnes,   Otto   A. 790 

G 

Gard,   George   H.  54 

Gast,    Minna  140 

Gast,    Peter    140 

Geisness,   John    235 

Gerhardson,  Xels 202 

Gilbertson,    Gabriel   __  77? 

Gilbertson,    Hans  969 

(■lrn,U.  Andrew 489 

Glende,  Anton 601 

Goldschmitz,  Peter  1003 

Gould,   Winfield   W.   531 

Granrud,  Ed  C.  836 

Grass,  John   11. 74 

Gray,   Frank  H.     63 


Green,    Dwite    R.   354 

Grcenagel,  John  P. 771 

Greenwood,  Milton  R. 427 

Grefe,    Herman   292 

Grina,  Ever  (  I <>*7 

Grina,    Melvin    I.    823 

Grinager,    Haavel  155 

Grouws,    Frank   769 

Guldseth,    Seven    H.    916 

Gulleson,  Edward 983 

Gunderson,   Knut  791 

Gustafson,   Andrew   90 

H 

Haagenson,     Haagen    349 

Haagenson,    Xicolai    809 

Haagenson,    Xils    840 

Haarstad,   Joseph   S.   754 

I  I  .i.i  \  i .  John  P. 72 

Hagen,   Emil   154 

Hagen,  ole  M.  867 

Haggstrom,   John   G.    267 

Haglund,   John    342 

Haglund,   John  44" 

Hall.    Hugh   H.  594 

Italian.  Jonas   O. 746 

Halvorsen,  Martin  O. 495 

Halvorson.  Louis 203 

Halvorson,   Stillman    471 

Halverson,  Taylor  R. 802 

Hanecam,  John 346 

Hannah,    Robert    67 

Hansel,   Christ  J. 562 

Hansel.    Christian    A.    523 

Hansen.  Fred 818 

Hansen,  Knud  C. 272 

Hansen.   Knut   891 

Hansen,    Peter    828 

Hansen,  Stengrim 168 

Hanson,  Andrew 740 

Hanson,   Andrew   990 

Hanson,   Carl   914 

Hanson,    Charles   929 

Hanson,  F.J 965 

Hanson,  Gustav 249 

Hanson,    Hans   C. 228 

lla.i-..,,,    Hans   S.   47l) 

Hanson,    Hcndrick  A.   325 

Hanson,  John 635 

Hanson.    Lewis   830 

Hanson,    Ola    K.    718 

Hanson,    Ole    730 

Hanson,    Ole    __      475 

Peder   P.   622 


BIOGRAPHICAL    INDEX. 


Harris.    Harrison    ._.. 

Harris.   Willia    H. 369 

Hatch.  AHs.it   C. 91 

Hatling,  Jacob  O. 186 

i   a  I ■  Hti  i  .   390 

i  itto   M  .   M     I).  69 

Haugen,  Amund  N.  200 

Haugen,   Carl    D.   173 

Hauger,   St<  ffen     \  183 

on,   John    A.    571 

Hayhurst,  <  olbert   G.  760 

W  illard  80S 

Heembrock,    Ferdinand    479 

M. 266 

Hegseth,  Thorsten  P. 171 

Helseth,  Ole   G.  700 

Toseph    B.   ■ 613 

Henderson,    William    J.   253 

Henry,   Ole    -     500 

431 

Herness,    Christian    81 

Ilcxnm,    Martin    H. 544 

Hexum,  Ole  M. 131 

Highdale,  J.  B. 968 

Hilden,   Thomas   I.   322 

Hilkoske,    John    944 

Hille,    Hon.    Hans   T.   44 

Hixson,    Daniel    W.   624 

Hodgson,  Fred  E.  56 

Hodgson,    Thomas    C.    57 

Hcff,     Henry     G.    242 

Hoffmann,   William  J.  806 

Peter  E.  963 

Petet    \". 966 

Holen,    Julius    1.    ...      657 

M. ,11., t   ,    \ll„  rt  898 

Hoi,,,,    Wi.h-rs   IT. 802 

Holm,   Loth   __..    782 

Holmes,   Leander ■ 232 

in    ill 

Holt,  Nels  N.  505 

646 

Honrud,  Ole     947 

nomas 394 

sin 

I    879 

in,   Herman  

742 

239 

Oli    0  379 

Hubbard,    Solon    942 

783 

129 

Hursh,  Jacob  M. 


Huse,    Nils   527 

i  ornelius 912 

Hustad,   Nels  589 

I 

Herman   G. 398 

[ngalls,  William  E.  706 

Gustaf    S.    391 

Tnman.    Everett    E.    1006 

Ireland,   Philip  ?. 848 

\nilrew    244 

Isakson,  Oiaf  365 

Iverson,  Iver 158 

J 

i   cob        \dolph    903 

Jacobs,    Francis   R.   /43 

Jacobson,  I  ».  P.  B. 33 

Jacobson,    Rudolph    792 

III,  n.   Theodore   747 

I,  -*,n   104 

Janke,    William    619 

Jenal,    Edward    L.    274 

Jensen.     Hans     902 

Jensen.    Hans   P. 99 

Jensen.  Jens  P. 98 

Jensen,   Jorgen   854 

Jensen.    Julius    355 

Jenson,    Ludvig   973 

Jewett,  Eugene  A. 50 

Jezewski,   William   905 

Johanesen,  Christian 279 

Johnsen,    Andrew   358 

Johnson,    Amund   190 

Johns, n.  Andrew  P. 765 

Johnson.    Carl  J. 865 

Inlmsoii.    Christian   401 

Johns, ,n.  David 597 

Tohnson     Edward    420 

Johnson,  Emanuel  M.  343 

Johnson.   Ever 986 

Jerry  F. 778 

John  A. 604 

Johns,  m,   John    C. 

Johnson,   John   H.   0( 

Johnson,  John   M.   194 

Johnson,  John  N. 735 

rohnson,  John  O. 723 

Johnson,  Jonas  G. 543 

rohnson,     Leonard    293 

iohnson,    Ole    35m 

Johnson.    Olof    397 

Johnson,    Oscar    >;: 

617 


BUHIKAI'IIICAI.    INDEX. 


Johnson,    Swan    : 45(1 

Johnson,  Thomas  K. 800 

Johnson,  Torger 762 

Jones,    Henry    W.    722 

Jorgensen,    Christian    166 

Jorud,   Hans  L. 895 

Jorud,  Thorvald  L. 248 

Joslin,    Charles    S.   387 

Jung,  Jacob 247 

K 

Kaddatz,   Charles  W.  400 

Kallerman,  John  S. 217 

Kapler,  George   R. 383 

Kaufmann,   Anton   739 

Kempf,    William    H.    807 

Kendall,    William    H.   807 

Kirkvold,  Christ  E. 896 

Kittelson,    Christ   887 

Kitts,  Alexander 924 

Kjcr,   John   122 

Klein,  M.  B. 663 

Klimp,   Edward 356 

Kluenenberg,    Bernard   987 

Klug,  Carl  555 

Knott,  Peter  M. 751 

Knudsen,  Albert 498 

Knudson,  Christian  C. 189 

Knudson,   Xels   A.  514 

Knutson,  Albert  R. 363 

Knutson,    John    788 

Knutson,    Martin    869 

Kopperud,  Anton 549 

Kopperud,  Karl  J.  409 

Korth,    Albert    998 

Krause,  Arthur  A. 951 

Krekelberg,  John  H. 582 

Krogstad,  John  E. 956 

Kron,    Ole    517 

Kronemann,    M.   C.   736 

C  i  ii.       i.    Herman    925 

Krueger,  William  C. 259 

Kni.hr,    Charlie    727 

Kvernstoen,  Engebret  L. 270 

Kvilekval.   Thorbjorn   H. 575 


adwig,   W.   F,    558 

amson,    Edward   S.   928 

angen,   Ole  T.   552 

angm         Lowell   t.  85 

.angren,  Minis  O. 978 

angsjoen,    Wis    707 

angvick,   F.   II.  940 


Larson,    Albert   88 

Larson,   Andrew    376 

Larson,  Ed  E. 893 

Larson,   Gunerius   862 

Larson,  Hans 580 

Larson,    Hans    O.    121 

Larson,    Herman 488 

Larson,  Jacob   551 

Larson,  John   H.   510 

Larson,    Mr.   and    Mrs.    Louis   P 710 

Larson,    Mrs.    Martha    (Hilden) 375 

Larson,   Ole    764 

Larson,    Oscar    F.    111 

Car-.,  hi.    Thomas    101 

Laugen,   Peter  G. 454 

Lauritzen,   John   666 

Lausten,  Kasper 80S 

Leach,  William  J. 368 

Lehmann,   John    B.   880 

Lein,    Casper   215 

Lein,  Olaf 958 

Lein,    1'eter    126 

Leonard,  Melvin 705 

Levorsen,  Levor  A. 55 

Levring,   Andrew  566 

Lieder,   John   C.   460 

Lien,    John    344 

Lien.    Peder    504 

Lien.    Tobias    S.   16S 

Ligaard,   Halvor   P. 170 

Line.  dn.   William   192 

Lind.    Andrew    745 

Lindall.    Peter   713 

l.inder,   Peter __  341 

Lindquist,  Gustaf  A. 176 

Ling,  Eric  P. 693 

Lohmeier,  Lewis 138 

Loken,  John  H. 89 

1.,. ken,    Peter 726 

Long,    Michael    509 

Loop,    Leeman    574 

Lotterer.  Casper  W. 440 

Luebbermann,  Ernst 621 

Lueders,    Fritz    379 

Luhning,    Henry   D.   490 

Luhning,    Wilhelm    451 

Lund,  Andrew  T.  842 

1  u.i.l.    Edward  T.   520 

Lund,  Charles  A. 113 

Lund,  T\-man  A.  486 

Lundberg,  Claes  A. 265 

Lundin,   John    P.   907 

Lyksett,  Ole 255 

I. nob  150 


BIUCK  M'HICAI.    INDEX. 


I  yng,  John,   M.   D.  _.     197 

He   .1.    179 

Mc 

Hon.  William  H. 52 

McFarlane,  Edmund 588 

McMahon,   M.  T.   924 

M 
Madsen,  Hans  176 

M  (  >.   487 

Majava,   John    P.   602 

Maki.    Isaac    K.   581 

Malmgren,   Alfred   917 

Maneval,  Edwin   C. 329 

Mann.   Charles   H.   1005 

Manske,  Charles 568 

Marckel.   Amos   289 

Martinson.  Martin  K. 238 

Martins. hi.   Otto 557 

Matala.  Charles  A. 664 

Mathews,  Burton  H. 406 

Mathiason.    Even   202 

Matson,    Per  Gustav  283 

\i  a   tf    d,  John 633 

Matthews.  J.  V.  130 

Mattson,    Bernhard   855 

Maurin,    Henry   934 

Maurin.   John   844 

Maurin,  Marcus  P. 790 

Geo     i     \. 515 

Meland,    Rev.    Andrew  709 

Mclby,   Johan   A.  273 

Menge,   Gottlieb  362 

Me./,    Karl   503 

!  \ndrias 731 

M«    i  r,    Peter    F.    1004 

Meyer,    August  W. 474 

Miller.   August    899 

Miller,  Carl  .        145 

Miller.  George  II. 446 

Miller.    Henry    767 

i      Pi  tei    I  142 

der    V    446 

Moen,   <  hristian  J.   682 

ilberl       466 

■    341 

els  T.  208 

Moklev,    Martin    -  326 

Moklev,  Thorsten  S. 586 

Monson,   Arm    317 

441 

Moody,  Rev.  James 128 

trick      (08 


I  els  980 

Morrow,    William    ?33 

Mortensen,   Nels  J.  134 

Mortenson,    Martin    829 

tfo         Oliver   E. 493 

Murdock,   II.  J. 981 

Murdock,  John   975 

Murk,  Andrew  G. 291 

Murray,  John    E.   565 

Myhre,    Helmer    

N 

Nattestad,   Christen    546 

Nelsen,   I  Ian-  S.  

Nelson,   Adin   ... S2 

Nelson,    Vnton   E. 156 

Nelson,    Arthur  W. 567 

655 

Nelson,   Eddie  X.  776 

Nelson,    Erick   E.  154 

Nelson,    Frank    463 

Nelson,    Hans    445 

Nelson,    Henry    P.  213 

Nelson,  J.   Emil 561 

Nelson,   Jens    377 

Nelson,   Jens       251 

lohn    G.   

Nelson,  John    P.   870 

Ni  Ison,  John  \\  . 434 

Nelson,  Jonas     525 

Nelson,   Martin   T. 84 

Nelson,   X.  P.   R. F.22 

Nelson,  Xels 920 

Nelson,    Nels   404 

Nelson,   Nels  M. 382 

Nelson,    Nels   W.  703 

Nelson,   Nils  II.  323 

Xrls,,,,.    (  0e    I   .       .    95 

Nelson,  Ole  P. 777 

Nelson,  Wilson   I  920 

Nesbitt,    Janus    547 

Ness,  Ole   P.  798 

Nessa,  John  J. 716 

Nesvold,    Hans   786 

Newmann,   Erwin  F. 162 

■■  i<  holsor,    I     C. 789 

Niebets,    Jacob      608 

i  >tto   868 

Nilsson,    Vlfred  541 

Nodsle,  '  He   II.  332 

Nordin,  John     - 

Xorclmarken.    Oscar    312 

\n,lers   J.            ._  294 

Nordgaard,   John   259 


IUCRAPHICAL    IMH  X. 


Norgrcn,  John 223 

Nygaard,  Ole 626 

Xyhus,    Ole   T.    117 

Nylund,  Felix 230 

O 

Oak,  Otto  J. 328 

Oisen,    Lars   P.  537 

Olson,    Alvin    893 

Olson.  Andrew  B. 896 

Olson,  Andrew  C. 149 

Olson,   Anton  J. 763 

Olson,    C.    E.   330 

Olson.   Carl   E.   952 

Olson,   Charles   O.   989 

Olson,   Hans   O.   676 

Olson.  Hans  P. 424 

Olson,    Henry   107 

Olson.  John  353 

Olson,  John  H. 890 

Olson,  John   L. 873 

Olson,  Joseph   521 

Olson,   Kittel  545 

Olson,  Knut 961 

Olson,    Lars    307 

Olson.  Louis  C. 103 

Olson,  Oliver  448 

Olson,    Simon    889 

Olson,    Torkel    913 

Oman.   William    I.   414 

Onsum,  Lars  L. 181 

Otte,  Joseph  A. 212 

Otto.   Henry  C.  D.,   M.  D 550 

Ovri,  Rev.  Ellend  J 699 

P 

Page,   Hon.  Henry  G. 39 

f'arks,    Edward   251 

Parson.    Xels    781 

Parsons.  Judge   William   L. 49 

Pary,    Olof   219 

Paulsen,  Axel  S.  650 

Paulson.    Charles   334 

Paulson,  Haagen 900 

Peck,  Edward  A..  Jr. 347 

Pederson,   Carl   K.  691 

Pederson,  Gilbert  K. 874 

Pederson,  Ole 630 

Pederson,   Peter  K. 472 

Pederson,   Syvrin   886 

Peppling,  Charles 252 

Perdue,  Charles  II.   si; 

Perkins,   Steve   L.  573 

Perkins,   William   R.   590 


Person,   William   721 

Persons.  John   311 

Peters,   Ferdinand 647 

Petersen,   Peter 785 

Peterson,   Andrew   191 

Peterson,   Andrew  A.   297 

Peterson,   August 908 

Peterson,   Charles   A.   671 

Peterson,    Charles   G.   999 

Peterson.    Daniel    A.    502 

Peterson,    John     945 

Peterson,   John   A.   918 

Peterson,  John  A. 734 

Peterson,  John   A.   419 

Peterson,  John   W.   78 

Peterson,   Leonard 161 

Peterson,    Ole    S97 

Peterson,    Olof   508 

Petrie,    Adison    395 

Petterson.  Andrew  A. 391 

Phelps,   Ray  634 

Pickit,    Horace    77 

Pickit.  Justus 132 

Pierce,   Amasa  J.   411 

Pilger;  Ludwig 689 

Plowman,    Henry    643- 

Post.  John  P.   595 

Poulson,   George  A.   654 

Prentice,   Frederick 874 

Prichett,    Harry   S..   D.   D.  S.   439 

Proehl,  Herman  A„  D.  D.  S. 570 

Putnam.   Frank   S.   748 

Putnam.    Herbert  A.   556 

Q 
Quam,    Andrew    O.   688 

R 

Rakstad,    Gilbert    N.   598 

Ranger,    John    M.    701 

Ranstad.  Thomas  A. 110 

Rauch,    Rev.   George  J.   112 

Rector,    Sheldon    M.   644 

Reierson,  Gunder 185 

Restad,  Alfred  P. 631 

Revering,    Vugust  F. 591 

Reynolds,    Perry 878 

Rieman,   John   G.  548 

Riley,    Lewis    1..   __  61 

Rindal,    Mikkel 605 

R'fsbrudt,   E.  T.  152 

Kisl.ru.lt.   Ellef   hi. 4<>3 

Kisl.ru.lt.    Torkel    F.   268 

Ris'tad,  Rev.  Ditlef  G. 


BIOGRAPniCAL   INDEX. 


I     I  .    939 

Robertson,   Henrj    O.       677 

rgi     W.   670 

iristian    484 

Rolandson,    Ole    756 

ars   ' ).   271 

n,    <  >laf   639 

Ronningen,  Syver  O.  738 

Rosenquist,  Alfred  B. 518 

Martin   92 

Rovang,    Nels   X.   214 

i  lavid   L.  300 

ouis    444 

Rude,   Ole    M.    269 

Rudh,   Edward  J.  384 

Rulland,    Ever   O.   169 

l.u-ob   667 

Ryg,   Carl   L.   915 

S 

Sabbin,  John    927 

llon.  Ole   O.   600 

Salomonsen,  F.  E. 694 

Sams.  in.    Magna    932 

Saunders,   Frank  B. 834 

Sayer,   John   877 

Schachtschneider,  Otto   E.   100 

Schaut,  Rev.  A.  J. 800 

Scheer,  I  harles  787 

-.1          fohannes  P.   492 

01:       !       87 

Schmidt.  August 225 

Schmidt,  Gustav   

Schmidt,    Henrj  282 

Schmidt.  L.  II.  D.  282 

Vdolph    370 

Schoening,   Carl   O. 750 

.  William   F. 752 

fohn  H2 

Schultz,    II.  A.  851 

Schwanlz,  Julius  E. 638 

rcdricl  946 

758 

n    871 

962 

rohn  J.  172 

Sethre,   I  hristian    P.  II 
180 

Inlius   ________       821 

man 

"i,    I. ouis    .    _     984 

343 

Shaw.   Darius    X.   .    770 


Shea,   James    II.   359 

Shea,    Martin    442 

Shearer,    John    943 

SI, el, Ion.  George   W. 496 

I  Mai    I'h.,   M.  D 144 

Shirley.   Julius 885 

143 

Siebels,   Henry  E. 563 

491 

on,  Simon  319 

280 

- ret     Edward  399 

Sjord  il,      :    odor,  673 

I      -  882 

ert  C.      753 

Skoglund,  Xils  J. 275 

Skrove,  Sigurd   M. 35 

Sletner,  Bernhard  A.     507 

Slettede,  Ole  J. 464 

Smith,  Ellsworth  W. 825 

Smith.    Eric    174 

Smith.  George  W.  827 

Smith.    William    F.    361 

Smith.   Willis   A.   918 

Solum.   Andrew  O. 759 

Solum.   (»le   L. 658 

Sommerness,  Ole  M. 38S 

Sonmor,    Knul    V       —        .       „___  264 

Si  ver  C. 501 

Sorkness,   Colben   M.  335 

Spies,  Mrs.  Emilie 452 

Martin  H.  _.  906 

Bernhard 

Sti  rohn   950 

Stench  r.     Charles    623 

•  .    Knute 188 

Stenstn  im,  I  .aw  rence  P. 

Stillman,    Alphus    741 

inton  R. 632 

__' 372 

227 

\.  182 

224 

Strand,   Thomas   636 

I  rank   II. 127 

560 

Strommen,  Gilbert  T. 592 

Stubskind,   Ole  O.  661 

Ufred   W.  938 

M  rs.    Vugusta  I  Nordbi 
'    J.  218 

hn  O. 211 

375 


ISl'K.RAl'lIICAL    INDEX. 


Swanson,  Andrew 184 

Swanson,  John  W. 434 

Swanson,  S.  A. i 124 

Swenson,  Ole 151 

Syverson,  Sigurd  A.  1002 

T 

Tanglen,  William 277 

Taylor,  John   L. 948 

Tennant,  David  A. 51 

Tenter,  Henry 669 

Tenter,   William   '_  894 

Thomas.  W.  E. 287 

Thompson,   Anton   288 

Thompson,  Edward 724 

Thompson,    Esten    137 

Thompson,    Jacob    858 

Thompson,  John  B. 240 

Thompson,  John  T. 803 

Thorstonson,   Carl   970 

Thurnshelle,    Ole   172 

Thygesen,   Niels 832 

Tollefson,  Torger 425 

Tomhave,  Albert  C. 911 

Tomhave,  George  E. 519 

Tomhave,   Henry   135 

Tomhave,  John  J. 381 

Tommeraas,   Lars   O.  254 

Torgersen,  John  S. 245 

Torgerson,  Jens   456 

Torgerson,   Onon 201 

Torkelson,   Ole 651 

Tostenson,  Tosten 960 

Trana.  Anton  B. 118 

Trautner,  George 321 

Trenne,  August 207 

Trenne,  William 207 

Tucker,  Abner  S. 977 

Tullis,  David 877 

Tvedte,  Thomas  J. 953 

Tweten,  Andrew 305 

U 

Ulsaker,  Bjorn 522 

Umland,   Otto  717 

Utne,   Christian   O.   83 

V 

Vaglo,  John  M. 468 

Van  Antwerp,  Edward 923 

Vargason,  Orrin  H. 308 

Veden,  Andy  296 

Vidness,   Ole  O.  468 

Vigen,  Andrew  T. 364 


Vigen,  Jorgen  G„  M.  D. 304 

Vinje,  Olaf  A. 799 

Vogel,  Frank  J 728 

Vogel,    Frederick    668 

W 

Wagstrom,   Andrew    473 

Walbridge,  J.  Howard 250 

Wallace,    James    P.   720 

Wallace,  John 875 

Walseth,  Carl  L. 913 

Walstead,   Theodore 410 

Walz,    Michael    274 

Wangerin,   Richard    819 

Webber,  Edward  J. 160 

Webber.    Herbert    E.    83 

Weber,  Fred  L. 438 

Welch,  George  O.,   M.  D. 68 

Welch,  J.   H.  607 

Wemstrom,    Carl   G.  310 

Wendt,   Edward    678 

West,  Walter 870 

Westover,   William   E. 403 

Wetmur,  Amos  H. 429 

Wheelock,  Harry  M. 64 

Whitson,  Albert  G. 125 

Whittaker,  Frank  X.,  D.  D.  S. 70 

Wicklund,    Andrew   A.   620 

Wiese,   Albert   690 

Wilkinson,    Kleber    B.    642 

Will,  John  C. 526 

Wilshusen,   Henry   443 

Wilson,    Nils    692 

Wilson,    Oscar   F.   482 

Windsor,    Walter   B. 76 

Winter,   Ernest  F. 511 

Winther,    Henry   A.   73 

Wischnak,   Ferdinand 749 

Wold,  John  J. 299 

Wold,    William    O.    436 

Wolleat,  George  F. 996 

Woodhall.  William  A. 576 

Worden,    Harrison   1000 

Wright,    Chark-s    D.    48 

Wright.  Charles  J. 672 

Wright.  Charles  R.,  Sr. 680 

Wright.  Charles  R. 672 

Wright,  George   B.  36 

Wright,    William   584 

Wright.  Zeba     337 

Wutamaki,   John    662 

Wyatt,  John  K. 415 

Wynn.  Ceorge  B. 614 


B R  \!"lk\\l.    INDEX. 

Y  Z 

Young,    Benjamin   F.   ._  306  Zilliox,    Frederick    846 

Oscar 290  Zimmer,   William  744 

.   Charles  163  Zuehlke,  Ferdinand  465 


().   P.   li.  .1  \<  IOBSON 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


O.  P.  B.  JACOBSON. 

O.  P.  B.  Jacobson,  of  Fergus  Falls.  Otter  Tail  county,  was  born  in 
Fredriksvarn,  Norway,  July  2,  1857.  He  received  his  schooling  at  Sande- 
fjord,  where  his  parents  moved  when  he  was  three  years  old.  After  gradu- 
ating from  school,  at  the  age  of  fifteen,  he  went  to  sea  as  apprentice  in  a 
sailing  ship.  Four  years  later  he  graduated  from  Christiana  Navigation 
Board  and  got  his  captain's  certificate.  After  several  years  of  traveling 
around  the  world,  he  came  to  New  York,  where  he  was  offered  a  position 
at  Castle  Garden.  From  there  he  went  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  At 
that  time  it  was  a  growing  town.  Mr.  Jacobson  describes  Fergus  Falls  as 
"a  booming  Western  town"  and  he  soon  enrolled  himself  in  the  ranks  as 
clerk  in  a  general  store.  After  several  years  in  the  store,  he  went  on  the 
road  for  a  wholesale  grocery  house  and  afterwards  he  was  traveling  repre- 
sentative for  the  McCormick  Harvester  Company.  His  territory  was  very 
extensive  and  the  large  acquaintanceship  which  resulted,  aided  by  his  knowl- 
edge of  grain  growing  and  handling,  was  to  serve  him  well  later  in  his  varied 
career.  In  1909  he  organized  a  company  that  bought  the  old  and  well- 
known  Norwegian  paper,  Fergus  Falls  Ugcblad,  of  which  he  became  the 
editor  and  manager.  Like  his  other  lines  of  endeavor,  the  Ugcblad  was 
soon  a  success  under  Mr.  Jacobson's  management.  In  191 1  he  retired  from 
active  management  of  the  paper,  but  became  its  president.  He  accepted  an 
appointment  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  grain  appeals,  tendered  to  him 
by  Governor  Eberhart.  Three  years  later,  a  vacancy  occurring  in  the  state 
railroad  and  warehouse  commission  by  reason  of  the  resignation  of  C.  F. 
Staples,  Governor  Eberhart  named  Mr.  Jacobson  for  this  place.  In  19 14 
he  was  a  candidate  to  succeed  himself  and  was  nominated  and  elected  by 
an  overwhelming  majority.  In  recognition  of  his  thorough  knowledge  of 
small  grains,  which  are  a  feature  of  the  agricultural  resources  of  the  state, 
he  has  continued  to  look  after  that  part  of  the  business  that  conies  under  the 
commission.  The  employees  of  this  department  pass  on  every  bushel  of 
grain  raised  in  Minnesota  and  adjoining  states  and  establish  grades  as  fixed 
by  the  appeal  board,  and  is  known  in  everv  market  in  the  world. 
(3b) 


34 


\  I  Y,     Ml  NNES01  A. 


Mr.  [acobson  was  married  in  the  fall  of  [885  to  Miss  Gertrude  M. 
Olson,  from  Brooklyn,  New  York.  They  have  had  a  family  of  six  children, 
three  of  whom  arc  still  alive. 


HON.    HALDOR   BOEN. 


The  late  Eialdor  Boen,  who  was  a  member  of  (  ongress  from  the 
state  of  Minnesota  during  the  early  nineties  and  who  during  his  life  was 
prominent  in  the  civic  and  political  life  of  this  county  as  well  as  for  many 
years  a  prominent  newspaper  owner  and  publisher,  was  horn  in  Sondre 
Anrdal.  Valders,  Norway,  on  January  1.  1850,  and  died  on  July  20,  [912, 
at  Aurdal,  Otter  Tail  county,   .Minnesota. 

In  [868,  in  company  with  his  two  brothers,  Andrew  1*'..  and  Erick 
E.,  Haldnr  Boen  emmigrated  to  the  United  States  and  a  little  later  set- 
tled at  Grand  Meadow,  .Mower  county,  Minnesota.  There  they  remained 
with  relatives  for  a  short  time,  when  Haldor  went  to  St.  (loud  and  where 
he  pursued  a  course  in  the  State  Normal  school.  In  1871  he  came  to 
Aurdal,  Otter  Tail  County,  and  entered  a  tract  of  state  land,  comprising 
eighty  acres.  His  brother  took  eighty  acres  and  he  built  a  log  house  and 
broke  up  some  of  the  land.  When  he  was  twenty-four  years  old  Mr.  Boen 
was  married  to  Margaret  Brekke  and,  immediately  after  their  marriage,  they 
removed  to  the  homestead  which  he  had  previously  bought.  They  remained 
there  until    1888,  when  they  removed  to   Fergus  Falls. 

Shortly  after  removing  to  Fergus  Falls,  Mr.  Boen  purchased  a  com- 
fortable home  on  North  Union  avenue.  He  served  as  clerk  in  the  office 
of  the  register  of  deeds  at  Fergus  Falls  and  was  also  a  clerk  in  one  of 
the  legislative  sessions  of  the  eighties,  or  before  he  moved  to  Fergus  halls. 
In  [887  he  was  elected  register  of  deeds  of  Otter  Tail  county,  succeeding 
( ic<  irge  \\     Bo)  ington. 

Mr.  Boen  assisted  in  organizing  the  Fa 
became  its  secretary,  holding  the  position  fo 
at  that  time  was  coming  into  prominence  all 
The  \lliance  finally  decided  to  enter  into  pol 
party.  A  big  landslide  occurred  in  [889,  at  whicl 
swept  everything  before  it  in  this  part  of  the  state,  and  when  Kittel  Halvor- 

son  was  elected  to  '  ongress,  Mr.  Boen  being  our  of  his  prominent  sup- 
porters and  managers.  Mr.  Halvorson  served  two  years  in  Congress  and 
in  the  fall  of  [892  Mr.  Boen  was  nominated  and  elected  to  Congress  as 
Mr.  Eialvorson's  successor.  The  prestige  of  Populistism  at  this  time  receded 
and  two  years  later,  in  [894,  Mr.  I'.oen  was  defeated  by  Frank  M.  Eddy 
for  re-election.  Afterward  Mr.  Boen  returned  to  Fergus  Falls  and  pur- 
chased  the   Fergus  Globe,   which   he  edited    for  a   number  of   years  or   until 


\llia.u 

:e 

in    1 

884    and 

•n 

years. 

Hie 

Alliance 

T 

ie  state 

■  0 

f  M 

innesota. 

UN 

1  became 

the 

I  '1  >pulist 

H 

time 

the    in 

■w    party 

OTTER'  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA.  35 

failing  health  compelled  him  to  relinquish  the  editorial  chair,  at  which  time 
the  Globe  suspended  publication. 

Air.  and  Mrs.  Boen  had  nine  children,  six  of  whom  are  living,  namely: 
Sophia  M.,  Theodora  A.,  Harold,  Alvin,  Errick  and  Erwin.  Sophia  M. 
is  now  Mrs.  Jacob  Oualle  and  lives  near  Brooten,  Stearns  county,  and  they 
have  two  sisters.  Theodora  A.  married  Ira  Wall,  a  jeweler,  and  lives  at 
Washburn.  North  Dakota,  and  they  have  two  sons.  Harold  married  Mar- 
garet Plowman,  and  they  Live  in  Wadena.  Alvine,  Erick  and  Erwin  live  at 
home  with  their  mother.  Mrs.  Boen,  whose  maiden  name  was  Margaret 
Brekke,  was  born  in  Tellamaken,  Norway,  and  in  1861  came  to  America 
with  her  father,  who  was  a  farmer.  The  family  made  the  trip  to  America 
by  way  of  Quebec.  Canada.  Subsequently,  they  settled  in  Dane  county, 
Minnesota,  and  lived  near  Liberty  Prairie  for  twelve  years.  In  1873  tne 
family  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  and  settled  in  Aurdal  township,  where  they 
homesteaded  land  and  where  the  father  and  mother  lived  until  their  death, 
Airs.  Boen's  father  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-seven  and  her  mother  at  the 
age  of  ninety-three.  They  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  seven  of 
whom  are  living. 

Haldor  Boen  had  a  conspicuous  part  in  the  political  history  of  this 
section  of  the  state  during  his  day  and  generation.  He  worthily  discharged 
all  his  duties  both  public  and  private,  which  fell  to  his  lot.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber  of  the  Odd  Fellows.       1148894 

SIGURD  M.  SKROVE. 

Successful  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  public  spirited  citizen,  man  of 
public  office  and  leader  in  the  affairs  of  local  life,  Sigurd  M.  Skrove  is  one 
without  whose  record  and  a  review  of  whose  life  this  volume  would  be 
incomplete.  Sigurd  M.  Skrove  was  born  in  Norway,  on  April  22,  1867, 
the  son  of  Martin  E.  and  Martha  (Skrove)  Skrove,  who  were  natives  of 
Norway,  in  which  county  they  lived  until  the  year  1882,  when  they  came 
to  America.  Martin  E.  Skrove  is  the  son  of  Elling  and  Sigrid  (Kulstad) 
Larson,  who  were  born  in  Norway,  where  Sigrid  Larson  lived  until  her 
death  in  the  year  i860,  while  Elling  Larson  came  to  America  and  lived 
with  a  son,  dying  in  the  year  1897.  Martha  Skrove  is  the  daughter  of 
Jonas  T.  and  Martha  (Hallan)  Skrove,  who  were  farmers  in  their  native 
land  of  Norway,  in  which  county  they  lived  their  entire  lives. 

On  reaching  America,  Martin  E.  and  Martha  Skrove  came  to  the 
state  of  Minnesota  and  located  at  Fergus  balls.  Otter  Tail  county,  where 
they  lived  for  a  time,  after  which  Martin  Skrove  rented  a  farm  in  Douglas 
county.  Minnesota,  living  there   for  three  years  and  then  moved  to  Wilkin 


36  0TTEH    TAIL    COl   MV.    MINNESOTA. 

county,  Minnesota,  at  which  place  he  homesteaded  a  farm  of  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  land,  where  he  now  lives,  having  in  the  meantime  accumu- 
lated about  three  hundred  acres  of  land,  all  of  which  is  well  improved  and 
highly  cultivated.  Martin  E.  and  Martha  Skrove  are  the  parents  ol  -1 
children.  Sigurd,  .Martha,  Eline,  Ida,  Soren  and  Martin.  In  church  affilia- 
tion Martin  Skrove  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 
church. 

Sigurd  Skrove  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  or  Norway  and  for 
about  three  months  in  the  common  schools  of  Douglas  count}-.  Minnesota, 
after  which  he  tuck  up  a  homestead,  during  the  year  1888,  in  Wilkin  county. 
Minnesota,  where  he  engaged  in  general  farming  and  in  the  digging  of  well- 
in  the  community,  until  the  year  1893,  and  then  he  moved  to  Tumuli  town- 
ship, east  of  the  town  of  Dalton,  in  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  purchased 
two  hundred  and  fifteen  acres  of  land,  which  he  improved  with  a  remodeled 
house  and  by  the  addition  of  modern  equipment,  where  he  now  engages 
in  general  fanning  and  in  the  breeding  of  purebred  Holstein  cattle  and 
Duroc-Jersey  hogs. 

During  the  year  1893,  Sigurd  Skrove  was  married  to  Oline  Margaret 
Dahl,  who  was  born  in  Winneshiek  county,  Iowa,  the  daughter  of  B.  C.  and 
Anna  (Vick)  Dahl,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway,  who  came  to 
America  and  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  they  homesteaded 
a  farm  in  Tumuli  township,  after  a  short  residence  in  Winneshiek  county, 
Iowa. 

To  the  marriage  of  Sigurd  and  Olnie  Skrove  were  born  the  following 
children,  Martha,  Berten,  Neola,  Sanford  and  Milda.  Sigurd  Skrove  and 
his  family  are  interested  and  faithful  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 
church  at  Dalton. 

In  public  life  and  in  official  circles.  Sigurd  Skrove  is  prominently  con- 
nected, he  now  serving  the  community  as  justice  of  the  peace,  and  also  as 
treasurer  of  the  school  district.  For  ten  years  this  worthy  citizen  held 
the  office  of  township  treasurer  and  in  this  office,  as  with  all  other  public 
measures  or  projects.  Sigurd  Skrove  served  well  and  with  notable  efficiency. 


GE<  )RGE  BURDICK  WRIGHT. 

George  Burdick  Wright,  known  during  his  lifetime  as  the  first  import- 
ant figure  in  the  early  settlement  of  Fergus  Falls,  wa-  a  native  of  Williston, 
Vermont,  where  he  was  born  in  1835,  the  youngest  son  of  Brigham  and 
Urania  (  Murray)  Wright.  lie  received  his  academic  education  111  his  native 
state  and  was.  by  profession,  a  surveyor  or  civil  engineer,  having  been 
actively  engaged  in  that  profession  until   r86p.     lie  located  a  quarter  of  a 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  37 

section  of  land,  where  the  city  of  Fergus  Falls  now  stands,  on  the  north 
side  of  the  river,  in  1867,  U1  company  with  R.  J.  Mendenhall,  of  Minne- 
apolis. 

These  gentlemen  formed  a  partnership  and  sent  a  crew  of  men  to 
their  place  under  the  supervision  of  Henry  Dow,  who  arrived  on  the  site 
of  Fergus  Falls,  August  19,  1870.  At  once  they  commenced  the  construc- 
tion of  a  dam  across  the  Red  river.  They  also  commenced  the  erection  of 
a  saw-mill  and  the  next  spring  built  an  addition  and  put  in  one  run  of  stone 
for  the  manufacture  of  flour.  They  platted  two  hundred  acres  of  land  on 
the  north  side  of  the  river,  Mr.  Wright  having  secured  forty  acres  in  addi- 
tion to  his  former  one  hundred  and  sixty.  On  the  south  side  Of  the  river, 
they  platted  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  and  commenced  building 
and  improving,  this  work  having  been  the  beginning  of  the  town  of  Fergus 
Falls.  In  1870  and  1871  they  sent  a  crew  of  men  into  the  pine  timber  in 
the  region  of  what  is  now  the  town  of  Corliss  and  in  the  spring  of  1871, 
they  rafted  the  logs  down  the  river  and  had  them  cut  in  their  saw-mill  in 
Fergus  Falls.  Mr.  Wright  became  the  sole  owner  of  the  unsold  interest  of 
Mr.  Mendenhall  in  1879  and,  after  that  time  devoted  his  entire  time  and  all 
of  the  money  he  could  command  to  the  building  up  and  improving  of  the 
town. 

In  1 88 1  Mr.  Wright  built  what  is  known  as  the  "Beehive"  for  a  manu- 
factory. He  was  a  man  of  remarkable  energy,  just  such  a  man  as  was 
needed  for  the  trying  times  of  the  early  settlement  of  Fergus  Falls  and 
vicinity.  He  had  the  faculty  of  seeing  ahead  clearly  and  his  conclusions 
rarely  were  known  to  be  erroneous.  He  firmly  believed  the  town,  in  whose 
interests  he  was  working,  would  some  time  become  an  important  city,  but 
he  was  destined  not  to  live  to  see  the  full  fruition  of  his  efforts.  His  death 
occurred  on  April  29,  1882,  while  he  was  still  in  the  prime  of  life,  lieing 
then  only  forty-seven  years  old. 

In  i860,  George  B.  Wright  married  Serena  Ames,  the  adopted  daugh- 
ter of  Rev.  Charles  G.  Ames,  a  distinguished  Unitarian  clergyman.  Mrs. 
Wright,  who  is  remembered  by  all  her  friends  for  her  beautiful  character, 
died  in  Minneapolis  in  March,  180S,  leaving  two  young  children,  Mary  and 
Vernon,  the  former  of  whom  died  in  Wilmington,  Delaware,  in  [881,  and 
in  February,  1X70.  Mr.  Wright  married,  secondly.  Mrs.  Carrie  A.  W'hit- 
conib,  of  California,  who  brought  to  their  home  in  Minneapolis,  two  chil- 
dren of  ages  corresponding  to  those  of  the  children  of  Mr.  Wright 

Mr.  Wright's  early  life,  his  wonderful  business  qualifications  and 
tlic  pride  lie  took  in  the  city,  of  which  he  was  the  founder,  have  been 
described  in  the  following  words  of  his  intimate  friend,  W.  V  Croffut: 
"But  scant  justice  has  been  done  in  the  published   sketches  of  George  B. 


38  OTTER     I  'All     COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Wright  to  qualities  and  abilities  which  made  him  known  to  a  public  beyond 
the  circle  of  his  acquaintances;  or  to  the  gifts   which  he  displayed  to  the 

infinite  amusement  of  his  friends.  In  a  word.  .Mr.  Wright  was  an  exceed- 
ingly clever  man.  with  a  full  appreciation  of  the  deliciously  ludicrous;  a 
faculty  for  molding  into  form  those  clever  conceits  which  most  Americans 
like  to  read,  and  the  power  to  think  deeply  and  well,  and  to  express  his 
thoughts  with  very  pungent  English.  Thousands  of  people  who  never 
knew  the  genial  man  read  the  emanations  of  his  pen.  which  he  did  not 
hesitate  to  father,  and  the  large  number  of  contributions  which  he  made 
under  a  nom  de  plume. 

"A  large  part  of  these  emanations  of  his  pen  have  been  preserved  in 
two  scrap-books,  which  the  Pioneer  Press  of  St.  Paul  has  obtained  from 
the  family  for  reminiscent  reproductions.  In  the  second  scrap-book  much 
is  preserved  that  he  wrote  after  1875.  Probably  nothing  was  ever  done 
that  called  Fergus  Falls  into  more  public  notice  than  a  series  of  humorous 
advertisements  which  he  published.  He  made  them  so  eccentric  that  people- 
looked  for  the  periodical  changes  in  them.  It  was  his  persistence  in  causing 
the  phrase,  "the  coming  city  of  the  Northwest,"  to  be  linked  with  Fergus 
Falls,  which  has  undoubtedly  joined  the  name  of  this  city  with  that  phrase 
for  all  time.  These  advertisements  were  usually  headed.  'George  B.  Wright's 
Remarks,'  and  the  character  of  them  may  be  judged  from  a  few  specimens 
such  as  the  following: 

"Land!  Land!!  Land!!!  Land!!!! 

Mold  and  loam  and  clay  and  sand. 

The  very  ground  on  which  we  stand. 

(To  get  it,  how   we've  starved  and  planned)! 

Broad  landscape,  rivers,  mountains  grand; 

White  fields  by  blizzards  gently  fanned. 

Brown  lawns  by  torrid  blazes  tanned; 

Dry  dirt   marked  out — prospected — panned. 

"There's  not   a   thing  at   man's  command, 

Xot  even  greenbacks,  cash  in  hand. 

Is  really  real-estate,  but  land. 

Other  wrecked  crafts  may  strew    the  strand; 

'fhe  tiller  of  the  s,iil   will   stand 

Peerless;  and  none  with    failure  brand 

fhe  honesl   hauler  of  the  sand. 

"Bui  Mr  Wright  did  not  write  simpl)  nonsense,  tar  from  it.  Some  of 
his  best  renditions  were  upon  election  reforms  and  university  rules,  of 
which  latter  theory  he  was  one  .if  the    principal    advocates    and  put    the 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  39 

elements  of  the  cause  into  such  pungent  and  impressive  English  that  they 
attracted  attention  widely ;  were  commented  upon  and  quoted  by  the  metro- 
politan press,  and  provoked  general  discussion. 

"Very  many  people  in  Minneapolis  and  throughout  Minnesota  will 
treasure  memories  of  the  man  and  none  more  than  those  who  possessed 
his  intimate  friendship  and  acquaintance." 


HOX.  HENRY  G.  PAGE. 

The  late  Henry  G.  1'age,  who  for  forty  years  was  one  of  the  most 
respected  and  prominent  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls,  was  a  native  of  Sand- 
wich, New  Hampshire,  born  on  March  y.  1832. 

The  Pages  were  an  old  family  in  New  Hampshire,  Henry  G.  Page's 
grandfather,  David  C.  Page,  having  resided  there  and  his  great-grand- 
father, Joseph  Page,  also  was  horn  in  that  state.  In  1855  Hon.  George 
Page,  the  father  of  Henry  G.  Page,  after  serving  in  the  New  Hampshire 
Legislature  and  being  otherwise  honored  in  his  own  state,  decided  to  join 
the  Western  movement  and  come  West  with  his  family.  He  settled  in  Car- 
roll county,  Illinois.  There  were  hut  two  children  in  the  family  and  Plenry 
G.  Page's  only  sister  died  while  quite  young.  Mr.  Page's  mother  died  in 
1865  and  his  father  in  1867,  and  he  practically  was  without  relatives  all 
the  later  years  of  his  life,  there  being  no  kinsfolk  nearer  than  a  cousin. 

Before  coming  West,  Henry  E.  Page  attended  an  academy  in  his  native 
county  and  the  Northfield  Seminary,  in  Merrimac  county,  New  Hampshire, 
after  which  he  returned  to  the  farm.  Notwithstanding  all  his  other  lines 
of  business,  he  always  loved  farming  and  stock  raising  and  found  much 
pleasure  in  it.  In  1867  Mr.  Page  married  Alice  Humphrey,  who  was  born 
in  Lewis  county.  Xew  York,  the  daughter  of  Horace  and  Joanna  (Stiles) 
Humphreys,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  merchant  and  farmer.  There  were 
four  children  in  the  Humphrey  family,  three  of  whom  are  still  living,  Mrs. 
Page,  Mrs.  Emilo  Hagey.  of  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa,  and  C.  H  Humphrey, 
of  Fenton,  Iowa. 

To  Henry  E.  and  Alice  (Humphrey)  Page  was  born  one  son,  Henry 
G.,  who  is  living  in  Pelican  Rapids,  this  county,  where  he  is  engaged  in  Un- 
real-estate business.  He  married  Ruth  Kinney  and  they  have  three  chil- 
dren, Henry  George.  Marian  and   Rebecca. 

In  1867,  the  elder  Henry  G.  Page  engaged  in  the  banking  business  at 
Lanark,  Illinois,  with  his  brother-in-law.  Mr.  VanVechten,  and  dealt  more 
or  less  in  live  stock.  In  1S70.  his  health  failing,  he  went  to  Minneapolis, 
seeking  the  benefit  of  the  Minnesota  climate,  expecting  to  return  in  the 
fall  of  the  year;  but    he  gained   so  much    in    Minnesota   that   he  decided   to 


4<3  OTTER    T.VM     COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

remain.  He  became  interested  in  this  section  of  the  state  through  George 
B.  Wright  and  in  1S70  personally  investigated  the  region  about  Fergus 
Falls.  He  arrived  at  the  river  just  as  Mr.  Buse  was  finishing  the  pontoon 
bridge  at  Union  avenue,  in  "the  coming  city  of  the  Northwest,"  and  he 
was  the  rirst  to  drive  across  that   causeway. 

There  was  practically  nothing  here  at  that  time  even  to  mark  an  out- 
post of  civilization,  Hut  he  bought  more  or  less  land  in  this  section,  including 
the  farm  where  the  electric  light  dam  at  Fergus  Falls  is  now  located.  In 
1872  he  personally  located  in  Fergus  Falls  and  organized  the  First  National 
Hank,  James  Compton  being  cashier,  while  Mr.  Page  was  the  president 
He  was  a  man  full  of  energy  and  he  at  once  set  about  doing  other  things. 
He  bought  the  power,  now  known  as  the  Red  river  mill-power,  of  Wright 
and  Mendenhall  ami,  with  1\.  11.  Scott,  built  the  first  flour-mill  in  Fergus 
Falls.  Later  on  Mr.  Scott  retired  and,  through  James  J.  Hill,  who  was 
building  the  railroad  through  here,  Andrew  ( I.  Todd  became  interested  in 
the  milling  business  with  Mr.  Page.  Then  began  that  period  of  Scottish 
activity  which  caused  Fergus  Falls  to  move  at  a  rapid  pace,  culminating  in 
the  building  of  the  Grand  hotel  and  the  big  boom  of  1882  and  1883.  The 
ideas  of  his  associates  were  a  little  too  rapid  for  Mr.  Rage  and  he  sold  out 
his  interest  in  that  mill  ami  built  the  mill  known  as  the  Big  A  or  Cable 
mill,  because  it  was  run  by  cable  power,  which  was  the  common  method  of 
power  distribution  in  the  early  days  of  Fergus  halls.  The  Red  river  mill 
failed,  but  the  table  mill  proved  a  big  success  under  Mr.  Page's  careful 
management.  At  that  time  it  was  thought  Fergus  Falls  would  he  a  second 
Minneapolis  and  become  a  great  milling  center,  as  it  had  both  the  power 
and  the  wheat.  Mr.  Page  was  full  of  energy  and  enthusiasm  for  the  city 
and  he  joined  heartily  in  the  movement  to  build  it  up.  In  [882  he  Started 
to  build  the  dam  which  is  now  owned  by  the  city,  preparatory  to  building 
a  big  mill.  It  was  this  step  which  resulted  in  wiping  out  his  entire  fortune 
and   ended   SO  disastrousl)    to  all  concerned. 

Mr.  Page  said,  in  his  quiet  way,  that  he  was  worth  at  least  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  thousand  dollars  when  he  started  on  tin-  enterprise,  lie 
had  the  choicest  investments  around  here.  He  controlled  the  table  mill. 
he  was  interested  in  the  First  National  Bank,  and  had  bought  control  of 
and  became  president  of  the  Fergus  Falls  National  Bank,  he  owned  the 
Schacht  comer  ami  had  fifteen  hundred  acre-  of  land  near  the  city,  besides 
a  large  .-1111011111  of  other  propert)  The  dam  cost  far  more  than  its  pro- 
motel  expected.  The  mill  with  a  capacity  of  six  hundred  barrel-  and  the 
elevator  and  the  rest  of  the  plant  ran  above  the  estimated  cost  of  construc- 
tion From  tin-  very  outsel  the  mill  had  a  series  of  disastrous  years.  <  Inly 
thai  the  big  mill  was  operated  by  the   Page   Milling  Company  did 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  4 1 

it  show  a  profit,  as  it  was  impossible  to  get  much  wheat  from  farmers,  on 
account  of  the  location,  the  grain  having  to  be  ground  in  transit  and  switched 
from  the  Great  Northern.  The  Northern  Pacific  had  not  extended  verj  fai 
West  at  that  time.  The  river  went  down  and  there  was  a  series  of  years 
with  low  water,  during  which  the  proprietors  were  forced  to  run  the  mill 
by  steam.  The  final  blow  came  on  a  wheat  market  very  similar  to  that 
of  1909.  Wheat  was  very  high.  Uuyers  of  dour  held  oft  waiting  for  a 
new  crop.  The  mill  kept  grinding  and  sending  its  dour  to  commission  mer- 
chants, hoping  for  a  sale;  only  to  have  the  market  slump.  More  than  fifty 
thousand  dollars  was  lost  on  the  season's  milling;  it  was  impossible  to  hold 
out  longer  and  an  assignment  was  made  to  C.  D.  Wright.  These  years  of 
adversity  in  connection  with  the  big  mill  brought  out  all  of  Air.  Page's  force 
of  character  very  plainly.  There  was  never  any  bluster  about  him,  but  there- 
was  a  quiet  determination  which  few  men  possessed.  Fully  determined  not 
to  let  the  mill  fail,  he  hung  to  it  with  a  bull-dog  tenacity.  To  maintain 
his  credit  and  meet  his  obligations,  he  mortgaged  everything,  even  to  the 
part  of  the  homestead,  where  the  casket  factory  now  stands.  Following 
the  assignment,  in  1890,  came  the  hard  times  of  the  years  preceding  the 
panic  of  1893  an<^  me  choice  properties  which  he  had,  and  which  would  have 
helped  to  pay  the  obligations,  brought  practically  nothing,  compared  to 
what  they  had  previously  been  considered  worth.  He  lost  the  bank,  the 
A  mill,  his  farms,  his  horses,  his  fancy  cattle;  in  short,  everything  was 
swept  away  and  in  those  hard  times,  they  brought  almost  nothing  to  pay 
the  debts.  In  the  midst  of  his  financial  troubles  he  was  severely  injured  in  a 
runaway  accident,  but  left  his  bed  long  before  he  ought  to  have  done  so, 
in  order  to  help  straighten  out  his  affairs.  While  still  in  the  hands  of  the 
assignee,  the  big  mill,  together  with  the  elevator,  was  destroyed  by  tire. 
As  there  was  but  little  insurance,  this  calamity  completed  the  disaster,  and 
the  valuable  power  and  dam  were  sold  to  the  city  for  almost  nothing.  Mr. 
Page  never  fully  recovered  from  the  blow  resulting  from  his  failure.  Though 
he  did  all  in  his  power  to  help  those  who  bad  lost  through  his  failure,  to 
recover  what  they  could,  he  never  got  started  again  himself. 

Henry  G.  Page  was  not  only  prominent  in  business,  but  he  took  an 
active  part  in  politics  and  public  affairs,  hi  1S74  be  was  elected  state  senator 
from  this  district  in  one  of  the  most  memorable  campaigns  ever  carried  on 
here.  At  that  time  this  senatorial  district  included  all  the  territory  between 
here  and  Manitoba  and  some  to  the  south.  The  Republican  organization, 
which  was  largely  controlled  by  Hon.  F.  E.  Corliss,  nominated  Mr.  Jorgens, 
who  was  county  auditor.  The  opposition  was  based  upon  a  reform  move- 
ment, called,  as  is  usually  the  case  in  these  latter  days,  the  anti-monopoh, 
party,  and  was  directed  by  J.  W.  Mason,  J,  P.  Williams.  George  P>.  Wrighl 


4-1  !    • N  TV.     MINNESOTA. 

and  Mr.  Underw 1.  then  editor  of  the  Journal.     Such  things  as  were  too 

hot  to  print  in  the  Journal  were  put  into  a  sheet  called  The  Vanguard.  Hon. 
R.  L.  Frazee,  then  living  in  Becker  county,  was  nominated  for  representa- 
tive on  the  ticket  with  Mr.  Page  and  they  were  elected.  Mr.  Page  had  a 
good  majority,  and  Mr.  Frazee's  majority  was  four,  while  Soren  Listoe, 
on  the  opposing  ticket,  was  elected  as  one  of  the  representatives.  1  he 
principal  issue  in  those  days  was  to  get  a  railroad  for  Fergus  Falls  and 
Mr.  Page's  work  was  largely  in  helping  secure  legislation  winch  finally 
resulted  in  the  building  of  the  Fergus  Falls  division  of  the  St.  Paul  X- 
Pacific  road.  Mr.  Page  was  the  second  mayor  of  the  city  "I  Fergus  Falls, 
serving  for  two  or  three  terms,  lie  was  a  member  of  the  hoard  of  educa- 
tion for  many  years.  in  [884  he  was  named  by  his  party  as  a  delegate  to 
the  Republican  national  convention  at  Chicago,  a  convention  which  finally 
nominated  James  ( ',.  Blaine  for  the  presidency.  Mr.  I 'age  was  not  a  politi- 
cal leader,  hut  he  was  always  so  fair  and  so  willing  to  do  the  right  thing 
that  when  factions  got  into  a  tight  they  could  always  agree  on  him  as  a 
compromise  candidate.  He  always  had  has  own  views  and  even  after  he  had 
ceased  to  he  a  prominent  financial  and  industrial  factor,  he  newer  failed  to 
gel  out  and  help  when  there  was  an  issue  between  right  and  wrong.  Gover- 
nor Johnson  placed  him  on  an  important  commission  to  represent  Minne- 
sota. 

Henry  G.  Page  was  a  great  lover  of  horses  and  the  first  twenty  years 
he  was  a  resident  of  Otter  Tail  county,  he  raised  and  sold  many  line  driving 
horses,  although  never  favoring  racing.  Driving  and  training  his  horses 
was  his  favorite  recreation  and  he  always  had  a  stable  full  of  the  most 
spirited  colts  in  the  locality.  It  was  largely  this  out-of-door  life  which 
enabled  him  to  maintain  his  health  while  carrying  on  his  large  business 
affairs,  lie  was  one  of  the  first  to  raise  pure-bred  cattle  and  he  did  much 
to  stimulate  the  raising  of  good  horses  and  cattle  in  this  section.  Next  to 
having  his  friends  lose  through  his  failure,  his  greatest  grief  was  to  have 
to  give  up  his  stable  horses. 

Mr.  Page  was  a  typical  New  Englander.  He  was  quiet  and  unostenta- 
tious and  always  attended  strictly  to  his  own  business.  During  the  forty 
years  he  lived  here,  no  one  ever  heard  of  his  precipitating  or  being  involved 
in  any  trouble,  lie  was  very  retiring  and  reticent  and.  while  friendly  with 
all,  he  never  had  any  confidential  friends.  He  always  kepi  his  own  counsels 
While  not  called  a  religious  man.  no  one  ever  lived  a  more  moral  or  tem- 
perate life.  No  better  citizen  ever  lived  or  died  in  Fergus  halls  While 
common  consent  gives  the  late  George  B.  Wright  first  place  as  builder  of  the 
city,  Henry  G.  Page  was  a  good  second  and.  had  not  a  seemingly  unavoidable 
oine  upon  him  in  the  very  midday  of  In-  activities,   he  might   have 


OTTKR    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  43 

been  first.  In  any  event,  he  lived  a  good  life  and  Fergus  Falls  will  be  for- 
tunate, if,  in  the  future,  any  of  its  citizens  measure  up  to  the  standards  of 
Henry  G.  Page.     Air.  Page  died  on  June  20,  iyoy. 


JOHN  S.  BILLINGS. 


It  is  to  the  credit  of  Sheriff  John  S.  Billings  that  after  having  served 
a  period  of  ten  years  as  sheriff  of  Otter  Tail  county,  he  was  recalled  to 
that  important  office  in  1909,  after  a  lapse  of  some  eight  years,  and  has 
efficiently  filled  the  office  during  this  second  period  of  tenure.  He  is  popular 
among  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county  because  he  is  a  very  vigilant  officer 
and  is  possessed  of  great  physical  strength  and  courage.  Nevertheless,  he 
is  very  kind  and  sociable,  and  has  had  a  most  beneficent  influence  upon 
criminals.  He  has  found  that  many  of  them  have  a  good  side,  and  main-  of 
the  criminals  who  have  been  under  his  care  attribute  their  reformation  to 
his  counsel  and  his  advice. 

Sheriff  Billings  is  a  native  of  Rutland,  Vermont,  where  he  was  born 
on  March  24,  1852,  a  son  of  Leeds  and  Ann  Eliza  (Stone)  Billings,  the 
former  of  whom  was  a  farmer  and  a  cattle  buyer. 

John  S.  Billings  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Vermont,  and  expe- 
rienced the  average  routine  of  the  boy  born  and  reared  in  the  country. 
When  he  was  eighteen  years  old,  he  came  West  to  Minneapolis,  Minnesota, 
and  for  a  time  worked  for  his  board  in  Hennepin  county.  Later  he  worked 
on  the  farm  of  George  B.  Wright,  who  at  the  time,  was  engaged  in  the  real- 
estate  business.  Mr.  Billings  remained  with  Mr.  Wright  for  about  a  year 
and  then  joined  George  Beardsley,  a  surveyor,  and  with  him  went  to  Dakota, 
where  they  remained  two  seasons.  While  in  Dakota  Mr.  Billings  purchased 
two  horses  and  brought  them  to  Fergus  Falls.  He  again  entered  the  employ 
of  Mr.  Wright,  who  had  become  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Fergus  Falls,  and 
who,  in  fact,  then  was  the  proprietor  of  the  town.  He  continued  in  the 
employ  of  Mr.  Wright  until,  in  partnership  with  two  other  men,  he  pur- 
chased the  lumber  yard  owned  by  Mr.  Wright.  This  lumber  yard  was 
operated  in  partnership  until  Mr.  Billings  was  elected  sheriff  in  1S91. 

After  filling  the  sheriff's  office  most  efficiently  for  a  period  of  ten  years, 
Mr.  Billings  declined  to  be  a  candidate  for  re-election.  After  retiring  from 
office  he  engaged  extensively  in  the  live-stock  business,  in  which  he  had 
previously  been  interested  for  some  time  in  a  small  way.  Altogether.  Mr. 
Billings  followed  this  business  for  eight  years,  but  in  [909  he  was  again 
elected  to  the  office  of  sheriff  of  Otter  Tail  county,  and  is  now  serving  his 
fourth  term. 

On  October  11.  [876,  John  S.  Billings  was  united  in  marriage  to  Belle 
l\.   Bowman,  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Lerena   (Col- 


44  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

well)  Bowman,  and  to  this  union  three  children  have  been  born,  Leeds, 
who  died  in  infancy;  Jesse  T.,  a  farmer  living  near  Fergus  Falls,  who  mar- 
ried Julia  Gosch,  and  has  one  child,  Sheldon  John,  and  Lerena,  who  lives 
at  home  with  her  parents. 

Sheriff  Billings  is  considered  one  of  the  most  prominent  officers  in 
the  state  of  Minnesota.  He  is  bright,  alert,  and  is  widely  noted  for  the 
wonderful  power  he  exerts  over  men  with  whom  he  is  compelled  to  deal. 
Fraternally,  Mr.  Billings  is  prominent  in  the  Masonic  circles  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order,  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine, 
and  of  the  Knights  Templar.  He  also  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Flks.  the  Modern  Woodmen  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias. 


HON.  HANS  T.  HILLE. 


The  late  Hans  T.  Hille,  who  was  prominent  in  the  business  life  of 
Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  was  born  on  February 
28,  1852,  in  Bergen.  Norway,  and  emigrated  with  his  family  to  America 
in  1865,  when  he  was  only  thirteen  years  old.  After  the  family  had  arrived 
on  the  Atlantic  seaboard,  they  came  West,  to  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota, 
and  later  settled  in  Aurdal,  Otter  Tail  county,  where  the  father  carried  on 
farming  for  a  number  of  years. 

In  1889  Hans  T.  Hille  located  in  Fergus  Falls  and  engaged  in  the 
farm  implement  business  under  the  firm  name  of  Bartelson  &  Hille.  His 
partnership  with  Mr.  Bartelson  was  dissolved  in  1007,  at  which  time  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  Oscar  Wagner.  They  erected  a  brick  warehouse 
on  Cascade  street.  After  Mr.  Hille's  death,  his  son,  Thomas,  succeeded  to 
his  father's  position  in  the  linn  and  this  arrangement  still  continues,  the 
firm  name  being  Hille  &  Wagner. 

During  his  lifetime,  II.  T.  Hille  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  coun- 
cil for  four  years  and  in  1004  was  elected  to  the  Legislature,  receiving  a 
very  heavy  vote.  His  legislative  work  was  highly  creditable  to  him  and 
to  his  constituents  in  Otter  Tail  county.  He  was  also  mayor  of  Fergus 
Falls  for  some  time  and  served  in  this  latter  capacity  with  equal  credit. 
lie  was  eminently  successful  in  everything  that  he  undertook,  and  was 
recognized  as  one  of  Fergus  Falls'  most  progressive  and  prosperous  busi- 
ness men.  lie  was  a  power  in  local  financial  circles  and  for  some  years 
served  as  president  of  die  Scandia  Bank, 

Mans  T.  Hille  married  Karen  llallan,  wdio,  when  six  years  of  age,  came 
to  America  with  her  parents,  who  came  West  to  Kenvon,  in  Goodhue 
county,  Minnesota,  and  it  was  there  that  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hille  met.  To  this 
union  eleven  children  were  horn,  six  of  whom  are  still  living,  namely:  Clara, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  45 

who  married  C.  M.  Langeland  and  has  three  children,  Correne,  Morris  and 
Richard;  Julia,  who  married  E.  L,  Grinds ;  Thomas  A.,  who  succeeded  to 
his  father's  business  at  the  latter's  death,  received  a  common  school  educa- 
tion and  took  a  commercial  course  at  the  Park  Region  Luther  College  and 
the  Curtis  Business  College  in  Minneapolis;  Anna  M.,  who  is  teaching  north 
of  Fergus  Falls;  Emma,  who  is  teaching  school  in  North  Dakota,  and 
Jonas,  who  is  in  the  employ  of  Hille  &  Wagner.  During  Mr.  Hille's  latter 
years  he  was  in  poor  health,  so  that  the  care  of  his  entire  business,  even 
before  his  death,  devolved  upon  his  very  capable  and  energetic  son,  Thomas 
A.   Hille. 

The  late  Hans  T.  Hille  will  be  long  remembered  by  the  people  of 
Fergus  Falls  and  Otter  Tail  county  as  an  enterprising  business  man,  a  most 
valuable  citizen  and  a  most  respected  and  considerate  friend  and  neighbor. 


HENRY  T.  COLLINS. 


Among  the  older  residents  of  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  is  the  present 
city  clerk  of  that  city,  Hon.  Henry  J.  Collins,  former  auditor  of  Otter  Tail 
county  and  well  known  as  a  business  man  and  citizen. 

Henry  J.  Collins  was  born  on  April  29,  1855,  in  Christianstad,  in  the 
southern  part  of  Sweden,  on  the  Baltic  sea,  son  of  John  and  Nellie  (  1'eher- 
sen)  Collins,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  during  his 
active  life  and  is  still  living  in  his  native  land  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine 
years.     His  good  wife  died  in  18S2. 

Henry  J.  Collins  attended  the  University  of  Lund,  in  his  native  land, 
from  1868  to  1874,  inclusive,  qualifying  as  an  expert  mathematician.  He 
came  to  America  in  1875  and,  after  a  journey  West,  settled  at  Red  Wing. 
this  state,  where,  however,  he  remained  only  a  short  time.  He  then  moved 
to  River  Falls,  Wisconsin,  and  worked  on  the  farm  of  C.  V.  Guy  for  three 
years.  Afterward  he  went  to  Minneapolis,  where  he  met  an  old  friend,  who 
obtained  employment  for  him  in  the  Goodrich  mill,  where  he  remained  until 
1880. 

On  March  13,  1880,  Henry  J.  Collins  purchased  a  railway  ticket  for 
Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  and.  after  paying  for  the  ticket,  had  just  five 
dollars  ami  twelve  cents  in  his  pocket.  After  arriving  at  Fergus  Falls, 
Mr.  Collins  found  employment  in  the  saw-mill,  where  he  worked  until  it 
closed  down.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  O.  ( '.  Chase,  who  kept  a 
general   store,   and  was  employed  there  until   the  spring  of    [889.      lie   then 

kept   1 ks   for  Mr.   Frankovic  until    1890,   in   which  year  he   was  appointed 

deputy  county  treasurer,  a  position  which  he  held  for  four  years.  So  effi- 
ciently did  he  discharge  the  duties  of  this  important  office  that   in    1  So  1   he 


46  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

was  elected  auditor  of  Otter  Tail  county  for  a  term  of  two  years,  and  was 
re-elected  for  two  more  terms.  He  is  remembered  today  as  one  of  the 
most  capable  auditors  Otter  Tail  county  has  ever  had.  In  1889,  after  the 
expiration  of  his  long  term  of  service  as  county  auditor,  Mr.  Collins  was 
engaged  in  traveling  for  the  Deering  Harvester  Company,  as  a  collector. 
In  1900  he  began  working  for  the  McCormick  Company,  in  the  same  capac- 
ity, and  was  thus  employed  for  some  three  or  four  years.  In  about  1904  he 
accepteil  employment  as  an  accountant  from  Solo  Desky,  a  well-known 
clothing  merchant,  and  remained  with  Mr.  Desky  until  November,  1913, 
when  he  was  elected  clerk  of   Fergus  Falls,  a  position  which  he  still  holds. 

By  his  marriage  to  Mary  Gunerius,  a  native  of  Christiana,  Norway, 
Mr.  Collins  has  six  children,  namely:  Helma  <  ).,  the  wife  of  R.  R.  Paulson. 
of  Henning,  Minnesota,  who  has  two  sons,  Raymond  C.  and  Howard  P.; 
Ruth  P.,  who  married  S.  F.  Bogen  and  has  one  daughter,  Elna  R. ;  George 
A.,  who  is  a  grain  inspector;  Carl  T.,  who  is  deputy  city  clerk  under  his 
father;  Olive  H.,  who  is  attending  the  State  Normal  College  at  Moorhead, 
and   Roy  W.,   who  is  attending  school. 

Without  any  intention  whatever  to  bestow  credit  where  credit  is  not 
due,  it  may  truthfully  be  said  that  Mr.  Collins  is  one  of  the  well-thought-of 
men  of  Fergus  I  "alls  and  is  known  as  a  good  all-around  business  man  and 
an  expert  mathematician.  Henry  J.  Collins  is  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the 
Collins  family  are  members  of  the  United  Lutheran  church. 


LAFAYETTE  R.  ADLEY. 

Lafayette  R.  Adley,  well  known  in  Otter  Tail  county,  as  county  super- 
intendent of  schools,  was  horn  in  Maine  Prairie  township,  Stearns  county. 
Minnesota,  April  i(>,  1865,  a  son  of  Roswell  and  Joanna  (Blake)  \dle_\. 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  state  of  Maine.  Roswell  Adley  and 
wife  were  the  parents  of  seven  children,  three  of  whom  were  horn  in  Maine, 
and  four  in  the  state  of  Minnesota.  The  family  emigrated  to  Massachu- 
setts in  an  early  day.  and  from  that  stale  removed  to  Maine  Prairie  town- 
ship. Stearns  county,  Minnesota,  at  an  early  day  in  the  settlement  of  that 
section  of  the  state.  About  1870  the  family  came  to  <  Uter  Tail  county,  and 
located  in  Maine  township. 

Lafayette  R.  Adley  attended  the  districl  schools  of  Maine  township, 
this  county,  receiving  his  elementary  education  in  a  building  made  of  rough 
hoards,  wainscoted  on  the  inside  with  rough  hoards.  \  Iter  finishing  a 
course  in  the  elementary  schools  he  attended  the  State  Normal  School  at  St. 
t   I  .ud.  and   was  graduated    from  that   institution,   elementary  course  111    [889, 


OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,   MINNESOl  \.  47 

advanced  course,  1898.  Later  he  was  graduated  from  the  University  of 
Wisconsin  and  then  took  a  post-graduate  course  at  the  same  institution 
and  was  thus  well  prepared  for  educational  work.  After  finishing  his  edu- 
cation he  engaged  in  teaching  at  Northhome,  .Minnesota,  for  eighteen  months, 
and  in  [907  was  called  to  Fergus  Falls  to  act  as  assistant  county  superin- 
tendent of  the  schools,  under  Miss  Knudson.  In  [913  Professor  Adley  was 
elected  superintendent  of  the  county  schools,  a  position  which  he  now  holds. 
Lafayette  R.  Adley  was  married  to  Elizabeth  McClelland,  and  to  this 
union  have  been  horn  two  daughters,  Doris  Elizabeth  and  Abbie.  Professor 
and  Mrs.  Adley  are  prominent  in  the  civic  and  social  life  of  Fergus  halls, 
and  are  highly  respected  throughout  the  whole  community. 


PETER  A.  ANDERSON. 


Well  known  to  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  long  prominent  in 
the  official  life  of  the  county,  Peter  A.  Anderson,  the  register  of  deeds  at 
Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  is  a  natne  of  Rice  county,  where  he  was  born  on 
July  8,  1868,  the  son  of  Lars  and  Johanna  (  Peterson)  Anderson,  the  former 
of  whom  was  engaged  in  farming  in  Rice  county,  but  who  late  in  life 
removed  to  Leaf  Lake  township,  this  county,  where  he  purchased  land  and 
carried  on  farming  until  his  death,  m  January,  [912.  His  widow  is  now- 
living  in  Henning,  this  county. 

Peter  A.  Anderson  has  served  as  register  of  deeds  in  Otter  Tail  county 
for  eight  years  and  has  been  connected  with  this  office  for  almost  twenty-one 
years,  a  very  striking  testimonial  of  his  standing  in  the  community  and  the 
high  regard  bestowed  upon  him  by  the  people  of  the  county  where  he  lives 
and  where  he  is  best  known.  Mr.  Anderson's  early  education  was  obtained 
in  Rice  and  Otter  Tail  counties.  He  attended  the  Wilrnar  Seminary,  and 
afterwards  taught  school  in  Otter  Tail  county  for  two  years,  after  which  he 
became  a  clerk  in  the  office  of  the  register  of  deeds,  and  in  1800  himself 
was  elected  to  that  office.  Now,  after  more  than  twenty  years  of  con- 
tinuous service  in  this  office,  he  is  still  the  genial,  capable  and  efficient  public 
servant  who  has  long  been  so  popular  with  the  people  of  this  county. 

By  his  marriage  to  Fliza  Hanson,  a  native  of  Norway,  Mr.  Anderson 
has  two  children,  Jennie  and  Irene,  who  live  at  home  with  their  parents: 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Anderson  are  prominent  in  the  social  life  of  Fergus  Falls. 
Fraternally,  Mr.  Anderson  is  a  member  of  Corner  St. me  Lodge  No.  99, 
Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  lie  also  is  a  member  of  the  Independ- 
ent Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  tin'  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Benev- 
olent and  Protective  Order  id'  Elks. 


48  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,    MINNESOTA 

(II  \UI.1-S  D.  WRIGHT. 

In  the  history  of  Otter  Tail  county,  the  name  of  Charles  I).  Wright 
stand.-  for  all  that  means  success  in  life.  For  practically  a  half  century  he 
has  been  prominent  in  the  commercial  and  industrial  life  of  Fergus  Falls, 
and  has  performed  every  duty  as  an  enterprising  citizen  and  man.  After  a 
life  of  ceaseless  activity,  he  is  now  living  more  or  less  retired  in  Fergus 
Falls,  devoting  his  attention  and  time  to  his  many  personal  business  interest-. 
The  former  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Fergus  Falls,  he  was 
one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Water  Company  and  president  of 
the  company  for  many  years.  He  was  also  treasurer  of  the  Gas  and  Mill 
Company  and  the  Fergus  Falls  Water  Power  Company.  In  1885  and  1886 
he  was  mayor  of  Fergus  Falls  and  he  also  served  as  city  treasurer  for  several 
terms.  His  business  and  commercial  interests  are  almost  as  varied  as  the 
commercial   history  of  the  county   111  which  he  has   lived    for  so  many   years. 

Charles  D.  Wright  is  a  native  of  Addison  county,  Vermont,  lie  was 
horn  at  Orwell  in  1850,  the  son  of  Ethan  M.  and  Eliza  1  Bottum)  Wright, 
both  natives  of  Vermont.  Ethan  M.  Wright  was  engaged  in  the  mercantile 
business  most  of  his  life  and  was  pre-eminently  successful,  lie  was  a  man 
of  large  ideas,  socially  inclined  and  careful  in  all  of  his  dealings  with  his 
fellow  men.  Ethan  M.  Wright's  father  was  Brigham  C.  Wright,  a  sub- 
stantial farmer  of  Vermont. 

By  his  marriage  to  Eliza  Bottum.  Ethan  M.  Wright  had  three  sons, 
one  of  whom.  William  11.,  now  deceased,  was  a  well-known  banker  of  the 
state  of  Vermont;  George  M..  an  attorney,  is  now  living  retired  in  New 
York  (  ity,  and  <  harles  1).  is  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Charles  D.  Wright  spent  his  early  life  at  home  and  was  educated  in  the 
Highland  military  school,  at  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  at  the  Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic  Institute,  of  Troy,  New  York.  In  [869  Mr.  Wright  turned 
his  steps  westward,  coming  to  Minnesota,  where,  at  Minneapolis,  he  became 
associated  with  his  uncle.  George  B.  Wright,  in  surveying  work  for  the  gov- 
ernment. In  the  tall  of  1 S71 1  he  was  appointed  chief  draughtsman  in  the 
United  States  surveyor-general's  office  at  St,  Paul,  a  position  which  he 
retained  for  a  period  of  seven  years.  While  connected  with  the  government 
survey,  Mr.  Wright  traveled  over  a  considerable  portion  of  the  Northwest 
in  company  with  Andrew  Holes,  formerly  of  Moorhead,  Minnesota,  now 
deceased,  and  George  G.  Beardsley,  now  deceased,  of  Grand  Forks,  North 
Dakota.  They  had  a  magnificenl  opportunity  to  examine  and  locate  a  great 
deal  of  land. 

On   January   1,   1877.  ('harles  D.  Wright  located  at   Fergus  Falls,  having 
been  elected  vice-president  of  the  First  National  Bank,  of  that  city.     At  the 


CHARLES    D.    WRIG1 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  49 

time  the  First  National  Bank  was  located  in  Martin's  block,  with  Henry  G. 
Page  as  president,  Mr.  Wright  continued  in  the  office  of  vice-president  for 
five  years,  but  in  1882  he  was  elected  to  the  presidency  of  the  bank,  an 
office  which  he  held  continuously  until  June,  1912.  In  1881  a  new  bank 
building  was  erected  at  the  corner  of  Lincoln  and  Cascade  streets,  where  the 
business  was  continued  for  three  years.  On  January  1,  1884,  the  bank 
moved  into  a  new  location  on  the  northeast  corner  of  Lincoln  avenue  and 
Mill  street.  As  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  for  a  period  of  nearly 
thirty  years,  Mr.  Wright  had  an  important  part  in  the  development  of  this 
splendid  county. 

In  1878  Charles  1).  Wright  was  united  in  marriage  to  Lucy  G.  Barney, 
of  Maiden,  Massachusetts,  a  daughter  of  George  T.  Barney.  Mrs.  Wright, 
who  died  in  1903,  bore  her  husband  two  children,  George  B.  and  Murr)  S., 
the  former  of  whom  is  a  graduate  of  the  United  States  Navy  Academy  at 
Annapolis,  Maryland,  and  has  been  an  "Hirer  in  the  United  States  navy 
since  1002.  He  married  Margaret  Parsons,  the  daughter  of  Judge  William 
L.  Parsons,  of  Fergus  halls,  and  they  have  one  sun,  William  P.  Murry  S. 
Wright  resides  in  Fergus  Falls. 

Charles  D.  Wright  is  keenly  interested  in  the  history  of  Otter  Tail 
county.  Politically,  be  is  identified  with  the  Republican  party.  Fraternally, 
he  is  identified  with  the  Mason--,  the  Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  In 
Masonry  he  has  attained  to  the  rank  of  Knight  Templar  and  is  a  member 
of  Palestine  Commandery  at  Fergus  Falls. 


JUDGE  WILL!  \M   L.  PARSONS. 

William  L.  Parsons,  judge  of  the  seventh  judicial  district  of  Minne- 
sota, was  born  in  Westfield,  New  York,  in  1858.  He  was  educated  in  West- 
field  Academy  and  later  attended  Hamilton  College  where  he  was  graduated 
in  1878.  After  being  admitted  to  the  practice  of  law  in  1882,  Judge  Par- 
sons came  West  and  settled  in  Fergus  Falls  and  from  then  until  [913  he 
followed  bis  profession  in  that  place.  From  1898  to  19 13  he  was  a  federal 
referee  in  bankruptcy.  In  April,  1 9 1 3 .  be  was  appointed  judge  of  the  seventh 
judicial  district  of  Minnesota,  and  in  November,  1914,  was  elected  to  that 
office  for  a  six-year  term. 

Judge  Parsons  was  married  in  1884  to  Mary  Moorhead  McLane,  of 
Westfield,  New  York,  and  to  this  union  four  children  have  been  born : 
Margaret,  Ruth.  Katherine  and  Marion.  Margaret  is  the  wife  of  George 
B.  Wright,  a  lieutenant  in  the  United  States  navy,  and  has  one  child,  William 
Parsons.  Ruth  married  Dr.  C.  C.  Burlingame,  assistant  superintendent  of 
the  Fergus  Falls  state  hospital. 
i41,i 


50  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 


EUGENE  A.  TEWETT. 


Thirty-five  years  ago  Fergus  Falls,  the  county  seat  of  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  little  more  than  a  straggling  village  on  the  frontier  of  the  great  North- 
west. Today  it  is  a  thriving  city,  with  its  hanks,  its  department  stores, 
shops,  its  varied  and  successful  industries  and  its  magnificent  array  of  fine 
residences  The  hankers  of  Fergus  Falls  have  had  a  most  important  part 
in  the  development  of  this  splendid  city  and  one  of  the  oldest  bankers  in  the 
city  and  one  who  is  entitled  to  a  large  share  of  the  credit  for  the  develop- 
ment of  this  section,  is  Eugene  A.  Jewett,  the  present  cashier  of  the  First 
National  Bank,  of  Fergus  Falls,  president  of  the  Erhard  State  Bank  and 
of  the  Melby  State  Bank,  and  the  vice-president  of  the  First  State  Bank  of 
Dalton,  as  well  as  president  of  the  First  State  Bank  at  Underwood. 

Mr.  Jewett  is  a  native  of  St.  Charles,  Winona  county,  Minnesota.  He 
is  the  son  of  Haynes  and  Lydia  ( Sprague )  Jewett,  the  former  of  whom 
was  born  in  Eebanon,  New  Hampshire,  and  the  latter,  at  Hingham  Centre, 
Massachusetts.  They  came  West  in  an  early  day  and,  having  located  near 
the  village  of  St.  Charles.  Minnesota,  on  a  farm,  continued  farming  there 
the  remainder  of  their  lives.  It  was  there  that  Eugene  A.  Jewett  grew  to 
manhood  and  received  his  early  education. 

Although  Mr.  Jewett  was  born  on  the  farm,  he  found  his  opportunity 
'  for  success  in  the  counting  rooms  of  various  banks,  in  which  he  worked 
before  establishing  a  financial  institution  on  his  own  account.  He  was  first 
employed  as  a  clerk  in  the  Dover  State  Bank,  of  Dover,  a  private  institution, 
and,  after  he  had  worked  there  for  some  time,  was  employed  as  a  clerk  in 
the  private  bank  owned  by  J.  C.  Easton  at  Lanesboro,  Minnesota.  From 
Lanesboro.  Mr.  Jewett  moved  to  Fargo.  North  Dakota,  where  he  was 
employed  as  teller  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  that  city.  This  wide  and 
varied  experience  as  a  subordinate  in  varied  financial  institutions  has  been 
the  basis  of  his  larger  success  of  recent  years.  It  may  be  said  truthfully 
that  Eugene  A.  Jewett  was  thoroughly  well  prepared  for  the  vocation  to 
which  he  has  devoted  his  lifetime. 

In  December.  1881,  Mr.  Jewett  located  at  Fergus  Falls  and  there,  in 
co-operation  with  others,  organized  the  Fergus  Falls  National  Bank,  which 
opened  for  business  in  January,  1882,  as  the  Merchants  State  Bank.  Six 
mouths  later  it  was  converted  into  the  Fergus  Falls  National  Bank,  and 
Mr.  Jewett  remained  as  cashier  until  1883.  On  July  0.  of  that  year,  he 
transferred  his  services  to  the  First  National  Bank,  of  Fergus  Falls,  as 
cashier,  and  still  holds  that  position.  His  tenure  in  one  position  in  one  hank 
for  a  period  of  more  than  thirty  years,  is  the  most  striking  testimony  of  his 
work   a-  a  banker  ami   his  dependability  as  a    financier,   that   could   be  cited 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  5 1 

He  is  popular  with  the  officers  and  directors  of  the  bank,  with  the  depositors 
of  the  institution  and  the  public  generally. 

By  Eugene  A.  Jewett's  marriage  to  Ann  Basye,  who  was  born  in  Wis- 
consin, there  has  been  born  one  daughter,  Helen  E.  Fraternally,  Mr.  Jew- 
ett  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  and  is  treasurer  of  the  lodge.  He  is  also  a  member  of  Palestine 
Commandery  No.  14,  Knights  Templar,  and  is  the  treasurer  of  the  com- 
mandery. 


DAVID  A.  TENNANT. 


The  largest  milling  interest  in  Otter  Tail  county  is  the  Fergus  Flour- 
Mills  Company,  which  owns,  besides  two  plants  in  this  county,  a  large  mill 
at  Fargo,  North  Dakota.  The  president  of  this  concern  is  David  A.  Ten- 
nant,  a  well-known  and  public-spirited  citizen  of  Fergus  Falls,  who  was 
born  in  Rossie,  St.  Lawrence  count}-.  New  York,  the  son  of  Richard  and 
Ann  (  Livingston  )  Tennant. 

Reared  on  the  farm  and  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
town.  David  A.  Tennant  grew  to  manhood  in  New  York  state.  He  taught 
school  for  three  winters  in  New  York,  or  until  1879,  when  he  immigrated 
to  Fairbault,  Minnesota.  It  was  at  that  place  that  he  was  introduced  to 
the  business  which  he  has  since  followed  so,  successfully.  After  having 
been  engaged  in  the  milling  business  at  Fairbault  for  ten  years,  in  1889, 
Mr.  Tennant  moved  to  Northfield.  Minnesota,  and  for  five  years  was  engaged 
in  the  milling  business  there  on  his  own  account.  While  living  there  he 
also  operated  a  mill  at  Dundas.  Following  this  he  was  located  for  a  year 
at  Cannon  Falls,  Minnesota,  as  the  proprietor  of  a  mill,  and  in  1899  moved 
to  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  where  he  purchased  the  Otter  Tail  mill,  which 
he  operated  alone  for  about  nine  months,  at  the  end  of  which  time,  in  com- 
pany with  W.  B.  Windsor,  he  consolidated  the  Otter  Tail  mill  with  the 
Allen  mill,  the  consolidation  becoming  known  as  the  Fergus  Flour-Mills 
Company.  Five  years  later,  Mr.  Tennant  and  Mr.  Windsor,  the  controlling 
stockholders  of  the  company,  purchased  a  mill  in  Fargo,  North  Dakota, 
and  in  1912  they  purchased  the  Globe  mill  at  Perham,  this  county.  The 
entire  business  was  incorporated  in  1901  under  the  title  of  the  Fergus  Flour- 
Mills  Company,  the  present  officers  being.  David  A.  Tennant.  president  and 
manager;  Vernon  Wright,  vice-president;  W.  B.  Windsor,  secretary,  and 
C.  D.  Wright,  treasurer. 

Aside  from  his  own  personal  business.  Mr.  Tennant  is  interested  in  the 
progress  and  development  of  his  adopted  home  town  and  has  always  taken 
a  commendable  interest  in  worthy  public  enterprises.     Naturally,  Ik-  i>  well 


52  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

known  in  this  section  of  Minesota  and,  as  might  be  expected,  his  material 
success  in  life  is  founded  upon  this  admirable  personal  qualities  of  which  he 
is  possessed. 

Mr.  Tennant  was  married  years  ago  to  Dela  Smith,  a  native  of  Roches- 
ter, Minnesota,  who  died  in  1897,  leaving  two  daughters,  Gertrude  and 
Florence  A. 


HON.  WILLIAM  II.  McBRIDE. 

The  Hon.  William  H.  McBride,  former  mayor  of  Fergus  Falls,  veteran 
of  the  Civil  War  and  one  of  the  most  respected  residents  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  has  resided  in  the  city  of  Fergus  Falls  since  1901.  Mr.  McBride's 
father  was  Henry  B.  McBride,  a  minister  of  the  gospel  in  the  state  of  <  )hio. 
His  mother's  name  was  Christina   ( Thursby)   McBride. 

Born  in  Summit  county.  Ohio,  where  he  grew  to  manhood,  William  H. 
McBride  was  educated  in  the  Greensburg  Seminary  and,  at  the  beginning 
of  the  Civil  War,  enlisted  at  Massillon,  Ohio,  in  Company  1,  Seventy-sixth 
Regiment.  Ohio  Volunteer  Infantry,  in  which  he  served  three  years  and 
nine  months  and  received  an  honorable  discharge  in  Columbus,  Ohio,  after 
which  he  removed  to  Iowa,  where,  in  several  places  in  that  state,  he  studied 
law  for  some  year.-.  Subsequently,  he  removed  to  Kansas,  where  he  was 
admitted  to  the  liar  and  where  he  remained  in  the  practice  of  his  profession 
during  a  period  of  twenty-four  years,  during  which  time  he  served  variously 
as  a  member  of  the  Legislature,  insurance  commissioner  and  director  of  the 
penitentiary. 

In  1901  Mr.  McBride  moved  to  Fergus  Falls,  thi>  count}-,  and  engaged 
in  the  land  and  farm-loan  business,  which  he  still  follows.  Mr.  McBride 
served  as  mayor  of  Fergus  Falls  for  some  time.  He  is  a  well-known  mem- 
ber of  tlu-  Masonic  fraternity.  lie  was  admitted  to  the  order  in  Chariton. 
Iowa,  in  1866  and  demitted  to  the  Council  Bluff-  lodge.  Upon  taking  up 
hi-  residence  at  Fergus  Falls,  he  became  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge 
No.  99      Mr.  McBride  is  also  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic. 


NICOLAI   F.   F1FT.D. 


Among  the  many  enterprising  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls,  tin's  county, 
who  have  risen  high  in  the  estimation  of  their  fellow  citizens  and  who  have 
received  honors  of  no  mean  importance  within  the  gift  of  their  fellow 
townsmen,  1-  Nicolai  F.  Field,  attorney-at-law,  referee  in  bankruptcy  and 
abstractor  of  titles. 

Nicolai    F.    Field    was   born    on     August    [3,    1872,    in    Murray   county. 
1  inns, .ia.      ]|is  parents   were  natives  of   Norway,   who  came  to  America 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  53 

about  1870.  The  father,  Fred  N.  Field,  was  a  register  of  deeds  in  Otter 
Tail  county  for  six  years  and  is  now  associated  with  his  son  in  the  abstract 
business.     Nicolai  F.  Field  is  the  eldest  of  a  family  of  eleven  children. 

Mr.  Field  was  reared  on  the  farm  and  his  early  education  was  obtained 
in  the  country  schools.  After  his  graduation  from  the  common  schools, 
he  entered  the  Fergus  Falls  high  school  and  was  graduated  with  the  class 
of  1894.  During  the  next  three  years  he  served  as  deputy  register  of  deeds 
of  Otter  Tail  county,  under  his  father.  He  was  then  employed  in  the  bank 
operated  by  F.  G.  Barrows  for  one  year,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  con- 
cluded to  take  up  the  study  of  law  and  in  1897  entered  the  law  department 
of  Drake  University,  at  Des  Moines,  Iowa.  After  completing  a  two-years 
course,  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws  in  1899. 
Admitted  to  the  bar  of  Minnesota  in  1899  with  the  highest  grade  received 
in  the  examination  of  any  applicant  admitted  at  that  time,  he  opened  a  law 
office  in  the  Pickett  block  in  Fergus  Falls,  in  June,  189c).  Mr.  Field  has 
since  moved  his  offices  to  the  Fergus  Falls  National  Bank  building  and  enjoys 
an  extensive  practice. 

In  September,  1900,  Nicolai  F.  Field  was  married,  in  Fergus  Falls,  to 
Ida  Adams,  the  daughter  of  Charles  Adams,  who,  prior  to  her  marriage, 
was  a  well-known  and  successful  teacher  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Field  have  three  children,  Ruth,  Cyrus  and  Margaret. 

Fraternally,  Mr.  Field  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99, 
Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Flks. 


ARTHUR  M.  CORLISS. 


The  Corliss  family  is  a  very  old  family  in  America,  and  Arthur  M. 
Corliss,  the  present  chief  of  police  at  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  is  a  scion 
of  this  distinguished  family. 

Arthur  M.  Corliss  was  born  in  Wilkin  county,  Minnesota,  on  December 
17,  1880,  son  of  Charles  M.  and  Emma  O.  (Plinkston)  Corliss,  the  former 
of  whom  was  born  in  Wisconsin  and  who  emigrated  to  Minnesota  at  an 
early  date.  Charles  M.  Corliss  was  employed  in  the  mill  at  Balmoral,  in 
this  county,  where  he  worked  for  a  time,  after  which  he  removed  to  Battle 
Lake,  where  he  remained  a  year  and  then  removed  to  Wilkin  county, 
where  he  acquired  land  and  carried  mi  farming  until  1004.  when  he  retired 
from  the  farm  and  removed  to  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  still  resides. 

('hut  Arthur  M.  Corliss,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  reared  on  the 
home  farm  in  Wilkin  count},  where  he  attended  the  district  schools.  He  also 
attended  school  in  Pelican  Falls  and  at  Battle  Lake.     When  Mr.  Corliss  was 


54  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

twenty  years  old,  lie  married  and  afterward  moved  to  Stulman  county, 
North  Dakota,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  for  seven  years.  In  1908  he 
returned  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  located  in  Fergus  Falls  four  years  after 
his  father  had  removed  to  that  city.  From  1908  until  19 14  Mr.  Corliss  was 
engaged  in  the  land  business.  In  1914  he  was  appointed  chief  of  police  and 
is  now  filling  that  important  office  with  credit  to  himself  and  to  the  com- 
munity he  serves. 

To  Arthur  M.  and  Lillie  (Erickson)  Corliss  five  children  were  born, 
Clarence  M.,  Ethel  M.,  Gladys  I..  Ruth  M.  (deceased)  and  Earl  D.  Mrs. 
Lillie  (Erickson)  Corliss  died  in  1913,  and  afterward  Mr.  Corliss  married, 
secondly,  Florence  Candaux,  to  which  union  one  child  has  been  born,  James 
Franklin. 

Chief  Corliss  is  one  of  the  most  efficient  police  officers  in  the  history 
of  Fergus  Falls.  Not  only  is  he  efficient  in  the  position  which  he  fills,  but 
he  is  popular  with  all  classes  of  people  in  this  city,  and  is  doing  a  good  work. 
Fraternally.  Chief  Corliss  is  a  member  of  Lodge  No.  59,  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows,  a  member  of  Hazel  Lodge  No.  31,  Daughters  of  Rebekah, 
and  of  Aerie  No.  888,  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles. 


GEORGE  H.  GARD. 


Another  one  of  Otter  Tail  county's  prominent  citizens  who  was  born 
and  reared  on  the  farm  is  George  H.  Gard,  who  having  filled  an  unexpired 
term  as  clerk  of  the  district  court,  by  appointment,  was  elected  to  the 
position  in  1912,  and  has  acquitted  himself  with  rare  credit  in  discharging 
the  duties  of  that  important  office. 

George  H.  Gard  is  a  native  of  Elkhart,  Logan  county,  Illinois,  and  is 
the  son  of  John  W.  and  Kesiah  (Dunn)  Gard.  John  W.  Gard  was  burn  in 
leffersonville,  Indiana,  and  bis  wife  was  a  native  of  the  same  vicinity.  Mr. 
(lard's  parents  were  farmers  by  occupation  and  his  father  died  in  Illinois 
in  February,  1  < >  1  1 .  his  mother  having  passed  away  about  ten  years  pre- 
viously, in  September,  [901.  There  were  four  children  in  the  Gard  family, 
namely:  Elizabeth,  who  married  Silas  E.  Beebe,  of  Jacksonville,  Illinois. 
and  died  on  fune  5,  1915;  Charles  \\\.  who  married  an  Illinois  girl,  and 
lives  in  Middletown,  Illinois;  George  II..  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and 
Minnie,  tin-  wife  of  Edward  Barry,  of  Elkhart,  [llinois. 

After  having  spent  bis  early  life  on  the  farm,  where  he  was  Ik, 111  and 
reared.  George  II.  Gard  was  employed  in  a  general  store  in  Elkhart,  \fter 
attaining  maturity,  he  went  to  Springfield,  Illinois,  where  for  two  years 
he  worked  in  a  wholesale  crockery  store.  In  1896  Mr.  Card  came  to 
Minnesota,   locating  at    Fergus    Falls,   where  he  became   a   clerk    in   the   stew- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  55 

ard's  department  of  the  state  hospital.  After  having  been  employed  at  the 
state  hospital  for  four  years,  Mr.  Gard  took  up  life-insurance  work,  which 
he  followed  for  about  one  year.  He  was  then  appointed  city  clerk  and  held 
that  office  until  1909,  after  which  he  became  manager  of  the  telephone  com- 
pany at  Fergus  Falls  and  continued  thus  engaged  for  two  years,  or  until  191 1, 
when  he  was  appointed  to  till  out  an  unexpired  term  as  clerk  of  the  district 
court.  So  well  did  he  discharge  the  duties  of  this  office  that  in  1912  he  was 
elected  by  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county,  by  a  substantial  majority,  to  fill 
the  office  for  a  term  of   four  years. 

Not  many  men  in  Otter  Tail  county  are  better  known  than  George  H. 
Gard  and  not  many  men  enjoy  warmer  and  more  lasting  friendship  than  he. 
Fraternally,  he  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protec- 
tive Order  of  Flks. 

By  his  marriage  to  Augusta  Hendrickson,  who  died  in  1910,  Mr.  Gard 
had  three  children,  Donald  L.,  John  Russell  and  Dorothy.  On  December 
20,  1914,  Mr.  Gard  married,  secondly,  Julia  Hall,  who  was  born  in  North 
Dakota,  a  daughter  of  M.  O.  Hall,  now  a  well-known  resident  of  Minne- 
apolis. 


LEVOR  A.  LEVORSEN. 


Among  the  well-known  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  is  Levor 
A.  Levorsen,  deputy  clerk  of  the  United  States  court  at  Fergus  Falls,  who 
is  a  native  of  the  parish  of  Rollag,  Nummedal,  Norway,  where  he  was  born 
on  April  5.  1859,  the  son  of  Amund  and  Ingeborg  (Helle)  Levorsen.  The 
Le-sorsen  family  emigrated  to  America  in  1868  and,  after  landing  in  New 
York  city  on  July  4,  of  that  year,  came  West,  settling  at  Clinton  Junction, 
Wisconsin,  where  they  remained  for  two  years.  In  1870  the  family  moved 
to  Pelican  Rapids,  this  county,  and  there  the  father  homesteaded  a  quarter 
of  a  .section  of  prairie  land.  He  built  a  dugout  and  broke  the  land.  Later 
a  log  house  was  erected  and  still  later  a  fine  frame  house,  where  the  family 
lived  until  1902,  when  the  father  sold  the  farm  and  moved  to  Williams- 
burg, Virginia,  where  he  is  still  living  at  the  age  of  eighty  years.  His  wife 
died  in  1910,  in  her  seventy-eighth  year.  While  a  resident  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  Amund  Levorsen  took  an  active  part  in  public  affairs.  Tic  held 
practically  all  of  the  local  offices  in  the  town,  from  the  chairman  of  the 
board  of  supervisors  to  assessor,  and  was  also  chairman  of  the  hoard  of 
county  commissioners  tor  several  years.  As  chairman  of  the  hoard  of 
county  commissioners,  he  was  largely  instrumental  in  the  erection  of  the 
county  court  house,  lie  is  now  living  in  retirement  and  is  a  noble  specimen 
of  thoroughly  ripe  American  manhood. 


56  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA. 

Levor  A.  Levorsen  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools 
at  Pelican  Rapids.  After  growing  to  manhood,  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls 
and  accepted  a  position  as  clerk  in  the  office  of  the  county  auditor.  After 
the  first  year,  Mr.  Levorsen  was  made  deputy  auditor  and  held  that  office 
for  three  years,  lie  was  then  appointed  deputy  clerk  of  the  district  court 
under  the  administration  of  C.  J.  Wright  and  held  that  position  for  five 
years.  When  Mr.  Wright  retired,  Ik*  succeeded  him  as  clerk,  and  held  the 
position  for  four  years.  Mr.  Levorsen  then  engaged  in  the  abstract  busi- 
ness and  was  Aery  successful  until  the  time  of  his  retirement  from  business, 
in  1898,  when  he  was  elected  register  of  deeds.  After  having  held  that 
position  for  eight  years,  he  was  appointed  deputy  clerk  of  the  United  States 
court,  and  this  position  he  now  holds. 

Levor  A.  Levorsen  married  Laura  Larson,  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  who 
was  born  near  Grantsburg,  and  to  this  union  have  been  born  four  children: 
Irving,  who  is  now  a  student  in  the  department  of  mining  engineering  at 
the  University  of  Minnesota;  Frances,  ECingdon  and  Richard,  who  live  at 
home  with  their  parents. 


FRED  FA'FRFTT  HODGSON. 

Fred  Everett  Hodgson,  a  well-known  real-estate  dealer  of  Fergus  Falls, 
this  county,  and  the  son  of  the  late  Thomas  C.  and  Eliza  (Clague)  Hodg- 
son, was  born  in  Castle  Rock,  Minnesota,  on  August  16.  1872.  Llis  father, 
as  set  out  in  a  biographical  sketch  presented  elsewhere  in  this  volume,  was 
a  native  of  the  [sle  of  Man.  off  the  English  coast,  who  emigrated  with 
his  parents  to  America  in   1X44. 

Fred  E.  Hodgson  located  at  Herman,  Grant  count  v.  Minnesota,  with 
his  parents,  in  1877.  and  there  received  his  elementary  education.  Later  he 
attended  the  public  schools  of  Fergus  Falls,  to  which  city  his  parents  had 
moved.  Growing  to  manhood  in  Otter  Tail  county,  he  attended  the  State 
Agricultural  College  and  spent  one  year  at  the  University  of  Minnesota 
\i'tcr  leaving  school,  he  became  a  collector  and  a  credit  man  for  Dunham  & 
Eastman,  wholesale  grocers  of  St.  Paul.  After  being  employed  by  this 
company  for  six  years,  Mr.  Hodgson  took  charge  of  the  business  affairs  of 
an  uncle.  Edward  I.  Hodgson,  of  St.  Paul,  and  then  removed  to  Morris, 
Minnesota,  where  lie  engaged  in  the  real-estate  and  mortgage-loan  business. 
In  tool  Mr.  Hodgson  located  in  Fergus  Falls  and  established  the  same 
I111  i'K'--   in   thai   city.      His  business  has  become  large  and  profitable  and  he 

ognized  1  id;       ts       conservative  and  well-rounded  business  man. 

On  Jul)  11.  [QOi,  Fred  E.  Hodgson  was  married  to  Anastasia  Haley, 
and  to  this  union  there  have  been  born  three  children.  Thomas  Halev,  born 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  57 

on  June  2,  1902 :  Corrin  Haley,  June  7,  1908,  and  Anastasia  Haley,  March 
29,    191 2. 

Fraternally,  Mr.  Hodgson  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protec- 
tive Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  member  of  the  city  charter  commission  and  the 
citv  council,  and  has  contributed  much  to  the  welfare  of  this  citv. 


THOMAS  C.  HODGSON. 

The  late  Thomas  C.  Hodgson,  who  was  a  well-known  resident  of  Otter 
Tail  county,  and  who  was  a  highly-respected  citizen  of  Fergus  Falls  at  the 
time  of  his  death,  on  September  7,  1913,  will  be  long  remembered  by  the 
people  oi  both  this  city  and  county,  as  a  man  of  strong  intellect  and  a  leader 
among  his  fellow  citizens.  He  believed  firmly  and  thoroughly  in  the  father- 
hood of  God  and  the  brotherhood  of  man,  and  his  career  was  a  fitting 
example  of  the  humble  efforts  of  a  Christian  gentleman  to  live  according  to 
the  dictates  of  -his  own  conscience.  It  may  be  said  that  the  keynote  of  his 
character  was  breadth.  He  was  tolerant  towards  all,  charitable  of  his  judg- 
ment and  courteous  in  every  relation  of  life.  He  was  possessed  of  a  keen 
and  logical  mind  and  took  a  deep  interest  in  all  public  matters. 

Born  on  January  1,  1843,  m  the  Isle  of  Man,  the  late  Thomas  C.  Hodg- 
son, in  bis  long  and  interesting  career,  displayed  the  sterling  attributes  of 
the  noble  men  who  have  come  from  the  well-known  isle  of  his  birth.  He 
was  but  a  babe  in  arms  when  his  parents  came  to  America  in  1844.  They 
located  in  Galena.  Illinois,  and  remained  there  until  1854,  in  which  year  they 
removed  to  Dakota  county,  Minnesota.  There  the  elder  Hodgson  engaged 
in  farming,  and  it  was  there  that  Thomas  C.  Hodgson  grew  to  manhood. 
When  he  was  eighteen  years  old,  the  Civil  War  broke  out  and  on  August 
15,  1862.  he  enlisted  in  the  Eighth  Regiment.  Minnesota  Volunteer  Infantry. 
The  first  service  of  this  regiment  was  performed  in  suppressing  an  Indian 
insurrection  in  1863.  After  this  frontier  warfare  with  the  Indians  the 
regiment  participated  in  a  number  of  severe  engagements,  including  the 
sanguinary  battle  of  ?\lurfreesboro,  Tennessee. 

At  the  close  of  the  war  Mr.  Hodgson  returned  to  Dakota  county. 
Minnesota,  where  his  parents  lived.  In  [868  he  was  married  and  after  his 
marriage  lived  in  Castle  Rock,  where  four  of  his  children  were  born.  Nine 
years  later  he  removed  with  his  family  to  Herman.  Grant  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  homesteaded  a  farm  and  where  he  taught  school.  He  also 
served  his  community  as  justice  of  the  peace  anil  for  thirteen  years  was 
superintendent  of  the  schools  in  Grant  count)',  resigning  that  position  to 
become  assistant  grain  inspector  under  Governor  McGill.  In  1800  the  fam- 
ily finally  removed  to  Fergus  Falls,  in  order  that  the  Hodgson  children 
might  attend  school.     Two  or  three  years  later  the   family  moved  to  Ham- 


OCX  IV.     MIWIMIT  \. 


line,  where  the  children  attended  college.  In  1907.  however,  they  returned 
to  Fergus  Falls  and  there  Mr.  Hodgson  died  on  September  7.   19 13. 

During  his  long  and  varied  services  as  a  public  official  and  private 
citizen,  Thomas  C.  Hodgson  displayed  a  keen  and  logical  mind  and  a  deep 
interest  in  all  public  affairs.  He  was  a  writer  and  speaker  and  rendered 
valuable  assistance  to  the  movements  and  causes  in  which  he  believed.  As 
a  country-bred  boy,  he  was  studious  and  naturally  craved  knowledge.  Books 
interested  him  very  much,  and  this  proved  a  great  source  of  benefit  and 
comfort  to  him  in  his  later  years.  It  can  be  said  that  to  a  great  extent  he 
was  a  self-educated  and  self-made  man. 

To  Thomas  C.  and  Fliza  (Clague)  Hodgson  there  were  born  nine 
children,  namely:  Dr.  John  E.,  of  Spokane,  Washington;  Fred  E..  of  Fergus 
Falls;  Rev.  William  C,  of  Minneapolis;  Frank  C.  well-known  attorney  of 
St.  Paul;  Isabel  C,  who  married  J.  P.  Anderson:  Drusilla  M.,  who  mar- 
ried Charles  Nelson;  Kathryn,  who  married  A.  C.  Baker;  Genevieve,  a  student 
of  Hamline  College,  and  Mary  L.,  a  teacher  at  Rochester,  Minnesota. 

As  a  citizen  of  his  adopted  country,  as  a  neighbor  among  men  and  as 
a  father  and  husband,  Thomas  C.  Hodgson  was  beloved  by  all.  His  untimely 
death  was  a  distinct  shock  not  only  to  his  family,  but  to  a  host  of  friends 
whose  companionship  he  enjoyed  throughout  life. 


1  \MLS  A.   BROWN. 


\niong  the  oldest  and  best-known  lawyers  of  Fergus  Falls,  this  county, 
who.  besides  being  a  lawyer,  is  prominent  in  the  industrial  and  financial 
circles  of  Otter  Tail  county,  is  James  A.  Brown,  a  native  of  Chautauqua 
countv,  New  York.  The  extent  of  his  industrial  and  financial  interests  will 
appear  from  a  plain  statement  of  facts.  He  is  the  president  of  the  Fergus 
Packing  Company,  president  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Iron  Works  Company, 
president  of  the  Firsl  National  Bank,  of  Deer  Creek,  and  president  of  the 
First  State  Hank,  of  Powers  Lake,  North  Dakota,  lie  is  also  secretary  of 
the  lames  Land  and  Mining  Company,  with  property  near  Brainard.  More- 
over, he  has  been  prominent  in  religious  circles  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  is 
one  of  the  substantial  members  of  the  Episcopal  church  in  this  section  of  the 
state. 

fames  V  Brown  is  the  son  of  Ira  P..  and  Ursula  (Alverson)  Brown. 
Ira  I'..  Brown  was  a  native  of  New  York  state  and  a  well-known  and  suc- 
cessful farmer  in  the  Empire  state.  Tie  was  of  English  descent.  His  wife 
was  of   Scottish  descent. 

lames  A.  Brown  received  his  early  education  in  the  Forestville  Acad- 
emy, at  Forestville,  New  York.  Afterward  he  entered  Hamilton  College 
and  was.  for  several  years,  a  student,  at  that  institution,  receiving  the  degrees 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  59 

of  Bachelor  of  Arts  and  of  Master  of  Arts.  From  Hamilton  College,  Mr. 
Brown  went  to  Oxford,  New  York,  where,  for  some  time,  he  was  principal 
of  the  Oxford  Academy. 

Two  years  after  Mr.  Brown's  marriage,  he  came  West,  locating  at 
Fergus  Falls,  and  three  years  after  settling  there  was  admitted  to  the  prac- 
tice of  law  and  soon  thereafter  engaged  in  the  practice  with  W.  L.  Parsons 
as  a  partner,  an  arrangement  which  continued  until  191 1,  since  which  time 
Mr.  Brown  has  been  practicing  alone. 

In  1 88 1  James  A.  Brown  was  married  to  Mai  Mygatt,  a  daughter  of 
Henry  and  Maria  (Tracy)  Mygatt.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brown  have  no  children. 

Since  coming  to  Minnesota,  Mr.  Brown  has  taken  an  active  interest  in 
religious  affairs.  He  is  a  trustee  of  the  Episcopal  diocese  of  Duluth  and  one 
of  the  members  of  the  standing  committee.  He  was  also  a  delegate  to  the 
convention  of  the  Episcopal  church  in  Cincinnati  in  1910  and  to  the  con- 
vention at  New  York  in  iqt.S-  He  is  the  treasurer  and  a  vestryman  of  the 
St.  James  church  of  Fergus  Falls.  His  life  is,  therefore,  a  well-rounded 
one  and  well  divided  among  the  various  interests  which  ought  to  attract  the 
attention  and  interests  of  a  normal  man  living  in  the  average  American 
community.  His  well-rounded  conception  of  life  has  made  him  a  most 
valuable  citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  is  highly  respected  and 
where  he  enjoys  the  esteem  of  his  neighbors  and  fellow  townsmen.  In 
the  strictest  sense  of  the  word,  be  is  a  man  of  affairs  and  interested  in 
everything  which  pertains  to  the  welfare  of  his  home  city  and  county. 


GEORGF.  W.  FRANKBERG. 

George  \Y  Frankberg,  a  successful  lawyer,  of  Fergus  Falls,  this  county, 
who  is  rapidly  building  up  a  large  and  lucrative  practice  in  Otter  Tail 
county,  is  a  native  of  Fergus  Falls,  having  been  born  there  on  December  20, 
1882,  the  son  of  Erick  and  Louise  (Johnson)  Frankberg,  and  the  grandson 
of  Andrew  and  Britta  (Johnson)  Berg.  Mr.  Frankberg's  father  and  mother 
were  natives  of  Sweden,  a  biographical  sketch  of  whom  is  presented  else- 
where in  this  volume. 

George  W.  Frankberg  obtained  his  early  education  in  his  native  city. 
He  was  graduated  from  the  high  school  in  1900  and  afterward  entered  the 
State  University,  where  he  spent  one  year  in  the  academic  department  and 
one  year  in  the  department  of  law.  Mr.  Frankberg'  was  admitted  to  the 
practice  of  law  in  1904  and,  in  company  with  John  L.  Townley.  commenced 
the  practice  of  his  profession  in  Fergus  Falls.  This  partnership  continued 
during  a  period  of  five  years,  after  which  the  firm  was  dissolved,  since  which 
time  Mr.  Frankberg  has  continued  the  practice  alone.  He  does  a  good 
business  and  his  practice  is  rapidly  increasing. 


60  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Mr.  Frankberg  was  married  to  Mary  C.  Cooper,  daughter  of  Henry 
and  Mary  (Jones  I  Cooper.     No  children  have  been  born  to  this  union. 

Fraternally.  Mr.  Frankberg  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No. 
99,  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Mr.  Frankberg  is  also  a  prom- 
inent member  of  the  Chippewa  Club,  of  Fergus  Falls,  and  is  very  popular 
among  his  hosts  of   friends  hereabout. 


rEORGE  E.  COW" IXC. 


George  F.  Cowing,  one  of  the  sturdy  pioneers  of  Fergus  Falls  and 
Otter  Tail  county,  a  man  of  absolute  integrity  and  unflinching  courage,  who 
died  on  September  16,  1908,  was  a  member  of  the  bar  for  twenty-two  years 
and  prior  to  his  taking  to  the  practice  of  law  was  engaged  in  the  mercan- 
tile business.  In  fact,  he  was  one  of  the  pioneer  merchants  of  Fergus 
Falls,  as  well  as  one  of  its  pioneer  lawyers. 

The  late  George  F.  Cowing  was  born  on  February  26,  1S40,  at  Hexani, 
England,  and  was  the  son  of  Thomas  and  Jane  (Head)  Cowing,  the  former 
of  whom  was  a  railway  superintendent  in  the  old  country.  In  1850  the 
Cowing  family  emigrated  to  America  and,  after  arriving  on  the  Atlantic 
seaboard,  came  West,  locating  at  Sun  Prairie.  Wisconsin,  where  the  father 
took  up  land  and  carried  on  farming  until  about  1S60,  when  they  moved  to 
Holmes  City,  near  Alexandria,  in  Douglas  county.  Minnesota.  There  they 
were  living  at  the  time  of  the  Indian  insurrection,  when  all  of  the  buildings 
were  destroyed  by  the  Indians  and  the  families  were  compelled  to  take 
refuge  in  St.  Cloud.  Afterwards  they  came  to  Alexandria,  where  the  father 
operated  a  hotel  and  a  market  garden  and  where  he  spent  the  rest  of  his 
life. 

George  F.  Cowing  received  his  very  early  education  in  England.  In 
America  he  attended  the  Bigford  .Academy  in  Walworth  county  ami  Albion 
College  in  Dane  county.  Wisconsin,  where  he  studied  law.  I  lis  studies 
were  interrupted,  however,  by  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  War.  In  1862 
Mr.  Cowing  enlisted  in  Company  K.  Twenty-eighth  Regiment.  Wisconsin 
Volunteer  [nfantry.  He  was  mustered  into  the  service  as  an  orderly  ht- 
geant,  and  was  in  many  battles,  lie  was  discharged  at  Milwaukee.  Wiscon- 
sin, in  [865,  after  the  close  of  the  war. 

Alter  the  war,  George  F  (owing  returned  to  Alexandria,  which  was 
at  thai  time  a  frontier  town.  Soon  afterwards  he  engaged  111  the  saw-mill 
business  with  a  Mr.  Hicks,  lie  followed  this  business  for  a  time  and  then 
.,.1,1  out  and  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  in  Old  Chippewa,  near  the 
present  site  of  Brandon,  Douglas  county,  Minnesota.     Prior  to  selling  out. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  6l 

however,  lie  went  to  Fergus  Falls,  in  1870,  and  established  a  general  store. 
The  next  year,  accompanied  by  his  wife,  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  and 
continued  in  the  mercantile  business  until  1873,  when  he  was  elected  super- 
intendent of  schools.  He  held  that  position  for  thirteen  years,  during  which 
time  he  was  also  fitting  himself  for  the  practice  of  law.  He  was  soon  after- 
wards admitted  to  the  bar,  and  in  this  profession  he  was  engaged  during  the 
balance  of  his  life.  He  built  up  a  large  and  lucrative  practice  in  Otter  Tail 
county  and  was  a  man  not  only  well  learned  in  the  law,  but  also  an  able 
counselor  and  a  successful  pleader  in  court. 

On  December  28,  1868,  George  F.  Cowing  was  married  in  Hudson 
township,  Douglas  count}-.  Minnesota,  to  Penelope  M.  Strang,  who  was 
born  in  St.  Charles,  Illinois,  the  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Elizabeth  (Murry) 
Strang,  who  moved  from  Illinois  to  Minnesota,  where  her  father  farmed 
for  many  years.  Finally  he  removed  to  Alexandria,  where  he  lived  with  his 
son,  George  J.  Strang,  until  his  death.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cowing  were  the  par- 
ents of  four  children,  Irene  J.,  who  married  Homer  D.  Russell,  of  Chicago, 
Illinois,  and  has  one  child,  Wallace  C,  now  twenty-three  years  old;  VIrs. 
Irene  J.  Russell,  who  died  in  1906;  Dr.  Philip  G.,  who  lives  in  Montana, 
and  who  married  Helena  Everson,  and  Robert  M.,  a  resident  of  Chicago, 
who  married  Leona  Lochner. 

Mr.  Cowing  was  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  and  rose  to  the  rank  of  Knight  Templar.  He 
was  a  ready  and  fluent  speaker  and  a  man  who  was  popular,  especially  at 
fraternal  and  public  gatherings  of  all  kinds.  His  untimely  death  was  a 
distinct  shock  and  was  keenly  felt  by  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county. 


LEWIS  L.   RILEY. 


Lewis  L.  Riley,  a  prosperous  live-stock  dealer  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minne- 
sota, was  born  in  the  town  of  Massena,  St.  Lawrence  count)'.  New  York, 
on  June  15,  1866.  He  is  the  son  of  Plyn  and  Sophia  (Wilson)  Riley,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  Ireland  and  who  came  to  America  and  settled  in 
New    York  state  in  pioneer  times. 

Lewis  L.  Riley  received  his  early  education  in  Massena.  passing 
through  the  usual  routine  which  falls  to  the  lot  of  the  average  bo}  VIi 
Riley  was  reared  on  the  farm,  and  his  parents  dying  while  he  was  still  a 
mere  lad,  he  was  obliged  to  look  out  for  himself.  In  1891  he  came  to 
Fergus  Falls  when  he  was  about  twenty-live  years  old  and  a1  the  time  was 
glad  to  do  anything  to  make  an  honesl  dollar.  The  first  thing  he  did  was 
to  clip  the  horse  owned  by  Doctor  Duncan.  His  next  employment  was  as 
night  watchman  over  \delphet  Gohein,  who  had  murdered  a  woman  by 
the  name  of  Rosa   Bray,      Mr.   Riley  next   did  collecting   for  W.   P.   Bayley 


62  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     -MINNESOTA. 

for  several  months  and  afterward  went  to  Henning,  where  he  operated  a 
drug  store  for  five  and  one-half  years. 

After  selling  out  at  Henning  Mr.  Riley  removed  to  Battle  Lake,  where 
he  engaged  in  the  hotel  business  for  two  and  one-half  years.  Upon  return- 
ing to  Fergus  Falls,  he  engaged  in  the  live-stock  business  with  Mr.  Billing 
and  was  with  him  altogether  for  twelve  years,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he 
purchased  Mr.  Billing's  interest  in  the  business  and  has  since  continued  on 
his  own  account. 

Lewis  L.  Rile_\-  was  married  to  Alice  Rutley,  who  was  born  on  an 
island  in  the  St.  Lawrence  river.  They  have  one  daughter,  Harriet  Lucile, 
who  was  born  on  September  12,  1895. 

Among  his  other  interests  Mr.  Riley  and  wife  are  prominent  in  the 
social  life  of  Fergus  Falls,  .Mr.  Riley  being  a  member  of  the  Chippewa 
Club.     He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 


JOHN  O.  BARKE. 


One  of  the  oldest  members  of  the  Otter  Tail  county  bar  is  John  O. 
Barke,  who  has  been  a  practicing  attorney  in  Fergus  Falls  for  the  past 
thirty-five  years.  In  addition  to  the  law  practice.  Mr.  Barke  has  given  his 
attention  to  the  sale  of  city  real  estate  and  farm  lands.  Since  its  establish- 
ment, in  1892,  he  has  been  secretary  and  trustee  of  the  Park  Region  Luth- 
eran College.  John  O.  Barke  was  born  near  the  city  of  Stavangee,  Nor- 
way, November  12,  1850.  His  father,  Ove  J.  Barke.  was  a  farmer  and  con- 
tractor in  Norway,  who  emigrated  to  America  in  1870.  He  came  West  and 
settled  in  Story  county,  Iowa.  Mr.  Barke's'  paternal  grandfather,  John  O. 
Barke,  served  in  the  Norwegian  army  during  the  war  between  Sweden  and 
Denmark.  Mr.  Barke's  mother,  before  her  marriage,  was  Ellen  Anderson, 
also  a  native  of  Norway,   whose  people  were  farmers  in  their  native  land. 

Reared  on  the  home  farm.  John  O  Barke  received  a  common-school 
education  in  Norway,  and  then  took  a  short  course  in  a  Latin  school  at 
Stavangee.  Shortly  after  completing  his  education  be  came  to  America. 
and  for  a  time  was  a  student  in  the  Luther  College  at  Decorah,  Iowa.  Later 
lie  attended  the  \*<irth  Missouri  State  Normal  School,  and  from  time  to 
time  he  taught  school  that  he  might  earn  enough  money  to  pay  the  expenses 
incident  to  completing  his  education.  During  all  this  time,  however,  he  was 
giving  considerable  thought  and  attention  to  the  study  of  law.  and  in  1878 
entered  the  law  department  of  what  is  now  Drake  University,  at  Des  Moines, 
Iowa,  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  June.  [880,  with  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Law. 

T11  1880  Mr.  Barke  came  to  Otter  Tail  count)  and  opened  a  law  office 
in  Fergus  Falls,  having  been  admitted  to  the  practice  of  his  profession  in 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  63 

Minnesota  and  Iowa  the  same  year.  Mr.  Barke  has  followed  the  active 
practice  of  law  for  thirty-five  years,  and  is  now  one  of  the  oldest  members 
of  the  bar  in  Otter  Tail  county. 

In  1882  John  O.  Barke  was  married  to  Bertha  Nelson,  a  native  of 
Illinois,  and  the  daughter  of  Seward  Nelson,  a  native  of  Norway.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Barke  are  the  parents  of  five  children,  namely:  Ellen  J.,  a  teacher; 
Dr.  Owen  S.,  a  dentist,  who  died  in  May,  1914;  Arthur  R.,  who  is  asso- 
ciated with  his  father  in  the  practice  of  law;  Ralph  J.  and  Bertha  G.,  who 
live  at  home  with  their  parents.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Barke  and  their  children 
constitute  a  delightful  family,  and  all  enjoy  a  large  measure  of  popularity 
in  Otter  Tail  county. 


FRANK  H.  GRAY. 


One  of  the  early  comers  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  who  has  had  a 
large  part  in  the  commercial  history  of  Otter  Tail  county,  and  who  is 
descended  from  a  distinguished  family,  is  Frank  H.  Gray,  secretary  of  the 
Lamson-Gray  Company.  Mr.  Gray  has  a  medal  which  was  presented  to  his 
grandfather,  James  Gray,  by  Commodore  Perry,  for  meritorious  conduct 
and  bravery  in  the  naval  battles  on  Lake  Erie  during  the  War  of  1812. 

Frank  H.  Gray  was  born  in  Platteville,  Wisconsin,  in  1846,  and  is  a 
son  of  Neely  and  Adaline  (Stark)  Gray.  His  father  was  a  native  of  Vir- 
ginia, who  came  north  with  his  parents  to  Uniontovvn,  Pennsylvania. 
After  growing  to  manhood  in  the  state  of  Pennsylvania,  Neely  Gray  emi- 
grated to  Platteville,  Wisconsin,  where  he  built  a  flouring-mill,  which  he 
himself  operated.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Constitutional  Convention  of 
Wisconsin,  and  after  his  removal  to  Madison,  the  capital  city  of  the  state, 
he  engaged  in  the  coal  and  grain  business  there.  His  death  occurred  in 
Madison.  Wisconsin,  in  1875,  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  the  same  city 
in  1885.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  all  of  whom  are  deceased 
except  Frank  M.      The  deceased  children  are  Henry  L.,  Ellen  J.  and  Arthur  I. 

Frank  H.  Gray  received  his  early  educational  training  in  the  public 
schools  of  Wisconsin,  later  attending  the  State  University  at  Madison,  and 
after  finishing  his  education,  engaged  in  the  coal  business  in  partnership 
with  a  Mr.  Conklin,  under  the  firm  name  of  Conklin  &  Gray.  Tin-  part- 
nership arrangement  continued  for  fifteen  years,  until  1881,  when  Mr.  Gray 
came  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  and  in  partnership  with  a  Mr.  Daley, 
under  the  firm  name  of  Daley  &  Gray,  engaged  in  the  shoe  business  for 
three  or  four  years.  Later  Mr.  Gray  sold  out  his  interests  in  this  business 
and  engaged  again  in  the  coal  business  until  ioi_>.  when  he  became  asso- 
ciated with  Mr.  Lamson  in  the  contract  building  business  under  the  firm 
name  of  Lamson-Gray  Company. 


64  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Frank  H.  Gray's  first  wife  was  Fanny  Robbins,  who  was  born  in 
Platteville,  Wisconsin.  Her  father  served  seven  terms  in  the  Wisconsin 
state  Legislature,  and  was  a  prominent  man  in  the  public  life  of  that  state. 
By  his  first  marriage  there  were  born  two  children:  Xeely  H.,  manager 
for  the  Charles  Wright  Company,  married  a  Miss  McConnell,  and  they 
have  one  daughter.  Margaret;  Roderick,  who  was  the  second  child  of  Mr. 
Gray's    first   marriage,    is   deceased.      Some   years   afterward    Mr.    Gray   was 

married  to  Mary  Underw 1,  the  daughter  of  H.  J.  Underwood,  who  was 

the  founder  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Journal.  To  this  union  there  have  been 
horn  four  children.  Donald  U.,  Franklin  H.,  Jr..  Robert  I  deceased  1  and 
Marion. 

Mr.  Gray  is  a  member  of  the  Federated  church,  and  has  been  active 
in  this  denomination  for  main-  years. 


H  \KRY  M.  WHEELOCK. 

The  //  ekly  is  well  known  to  the  people  of  ( Itter  Tail  county; 

in  fact,  is  well  known  to  the  people  of  the  state  of  Minnesota,  who  read 
newspapers,  and  this  means  a  large  percentage  of  the  population.  Harry 
M.  Wheeiock,  the  editor  and  proprietor  of  the  paper,  and  postmaster  of 
Fergus  Falls  since  1914,  is  prominent  in  the  public  life  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

Harry  M.  Wheeiock  was  horn  at  Fredonia,  Xew  York.  June  14,  1859,  a 
son  of  Theodore  Bainbridge  and  Eva  (Jennings)  Wheeiock,  the  former  of 
whom,  born  in  Mendon,  Worcester  county,  Massachusetts,  is  still  living  at 
the  age  of  eighty-one  years,  and  the  latter  born  in  Connecticut,  died  111 
1880.  at  Duluth,  Minnesota.  Mrs.  Wheelock's  father  was  superintendent  of 
a  woolen  mill  at  Bridgeport,  Connecticut.  Theodore  B.  Wheeiock  and  wife 
were  the  parents  of  two  sons:  Harry  M.,  the  immediate  subject  of  this 
review,  and  Leland  L.,  who  is  now-  a  resident  of  St.   Paul,  Minnesota. 

Harry  M.  Wheeiock  received  his  education  in  the  normal  school  at 
Fredonia,  Xew  York,  and  at  an  early  age  became  a  printer's  apprentice, 
and  after  completing  his  apprenticeship  at  Fredonia,  worked  at  his  trade  in 
various  parts  of  the  East  and  West.  In  1882  he  settled  at  Fergus  Falls, 
this  county,  to  assist  in  the  establishment  of  the  Daily  Telegram,  and  for 
two  years  he  was  connected  with  that  paper.  In  [884,  in  partnership  with 
Capt,  I.  D.  Wood,  Mr.  Wheeiock  established  the  Fergus  Falls  Democrat. 
\  fev  years  later  he  became  connected  with  the  Fergus  Falls  Journal,  as 
local  editor.  In  1893  Mr.  Wheeiock  severed  his  connection  with  the  Fergus 
Falls  Journal  in  order  to  become  receiver  for  a  bicycle  factory.  In  [895 
Mr.  Whet-lock  established  the  weekly  newspaper  which  hears  his  name,  lie 
I  a  prize   for  a  suitable  title,  and   for  a  number  of  issues,  the  paper 


I 


I 

I  -Wk^        -         "If 


Jr 


i 


AKUV    M.    WIII'.KI.dCK. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.    •  65 

appeared  with  simply  a  question  mark  for  the  heading.  The  name, 
Wheelock's  Weekly,  was  finally  decided  upon  as  a  suitable  name. 

Mr.  Wheelock  is  widely  and  favorably  known  as  an  active  newspaper 
worker,  and  one  who  understands  all  departments  of  a  modern  newspaper. 
He  is  rated  as  one  of  the  best  writers  and  managers  in  the  state,  and  it  can 
be  truthfully  said  that  the  pen  in  his  hand  is  mightier  than  the  sword.  In 
191 4  Mr.  Wheelock  became  postmaster  of  Fergus  Falls  by  appointment 
from  President  Wilson.  Fie  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks,  and  is  first  vice-president  of  the  Editorial  Association  of 
Minnesota. 

Some  years  ago  Mr.  Wheelock  was  married  to  Alice  Josephine  Buck, 
who  was  born  in  Rochester,   Minnesota. 


CAPT.  OSMER   C.  CHASE. 

Among  the  old-time  residents  and  well-known  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls, 
Minnesota,  is  the  venerable  Capt.  Osmer  C.  Chase,  steward  of  the  Minne- 
sota state  hospital,  at  Fergus  Falls,  for  the  past  twenty-six  years,  having 
been  appointed  to  the  position  in  1889.  His  long  tenure  of  service  in  this 
position  is  a  tribute  not  only  to  his  skill  and  his  ability,  but  also  to  the  genial 
personality  of  which  he  is  possessed  and  which  has  made  his  tenure  a  most 
pleasant  experience  in  the  official  life  of  this  great  institution. 

A  native  of  Darian,  Genesee  county,  Xew  York,  Capt.  Osmer  C.  Chase 
was  born  in  1838,  and  is  the  son  of  John  and  Sophia  (  Dimock)  Chase,  the 
former  of  whom  was  a  native  of  Otsego,  New  York,  and  the  latter  of 
Northampton.  Massachusetts.  In  1841  the  entire  Chase  family  removed 
to  Ohio,  where  John  Chase  became  a  farmer  and  storekeeper  in  Geauga 
county,  about  twenty-four  miles  from  Cleveland.  It  was  here  that 
Osmer  C.  Chase  was  reared.  He  was  a  student  at  Hiram  College  when 
the  Civil  War  broke  out,  and  this  seriously  interfered  with  the  completion 
of  his  education.  In  1861  he  joined  the  Sixth  Ohio  Volunteer  Cavalry 
under  Wade  and  Hutchins  and  saw  active  service  for  some  time.  He  was 
later  transferred  to  Company  E,  One  Hundred  and  Seventy-seventh  Regi- 
ment, Ohio  Volunteer  Infantry,  a  company  of  which  he  was  instrumental 
in  organizing  and  of  which  he  became  captain.  He  was  honorablj  dis- 
charged in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  on  July  7,  1865,  and  upon  this  occasion  was 
presented  with  a  beautiful  gold  watch  and  chain  by  the  survivors  of  his 
company.  After  living  in  Ohio  for  a  time,  Captain  Chase  left  the  state 
for  the  oil  regions  of  Pennsylvania  and  there  he  remained  for  a  few  months. 
While  a  soldier  in  the  Union  army  his  parents  had  removed  to  Lake  Gene- 
va, Wisconsin,  and  in  the  year  1866  Captain  Chase  also  joined  his  parents 
(5b) 


IUNTY, 

M  I  N  N  ESI 

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act  of  lam 

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six   ye; 

irs.  when 

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s   father's  f; 

inn. 

ve< 

1  to  Elkl 

10m 

yea 

rs.      In  i 

879 

er 

the  name  of 

of 

O.  C.  Chase 

M 

r.   <  '.rant 

and 

[e 

operate* 

1    a 

iur 

years,  \\ 

rhen 

the  state  as 

the 

66  OTTER     IV 

in  the  state  of  Wisconsin,  purchasing 

There  lie  engaged  in  farming  for  si 

and  established  a  general  store,  which  he  operated  for   four 

he  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and  opened  a  store  for  a  year  un< 

( ).  C.  Chase,  and  later  for  some  time  under  the   firm  name 

&  Company.     Subsequently,  however,  he  sold  the  store  to  a 

engaged   in   the  manufacture  of   cheese  at   Fergus    Falls. 

large  factory  and  did  a  prosperous  business   for  three  or   fi 

he  sold  out.      In  1889  Captain  Chase  entered  the  employ  of 

steward  of  the  state  hospital,  a  position  which  he  has  so  ably  held  for  more 

than  a  quarter  of  a  century. 

In  1869  ('apt.  Osmer  C.  (base  was  married  to  Delia  Potter,  and  they 
are  the  parents  of  two  daughters,  Etta  May  and  Alice  Catherine.  The 
former  is  now  the  wife  of  Dr.  H.  J.  Lafhtte,  and  the  latter  is  the  wife  of 
E.  J.  Fairbanks.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Chase  are  well  known  in  the  social  and 
civic  life  of  Fergus  halls  and  Otter  Tail  county  and  are  popular  among  all 
classes  of  people.  Captain  Chase  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  having  joined  this  historic  order  at  Flkhorn,  Wisconsin,  and 
having  later  affiliated  with  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  00.  of  Fergus  halls. 
Minnesota.  He  is  a  good  man  and  a  good  citizen,  well  known  and  highly 
respected  in  the  county  which  has  been  his  home  tor  so  many  years. 


WILLIAM  P.   BAYLEY 


The  world  is  always  willing  to  honor  self-made  men,  men  who,  by 
their  own  exertion  and  industry,  step  by  step  mount  the  ladder  of  success. 
Among  the  men  well  known  to  Fergus  Falls  and  Otter  Fail  county.  Minne- 
sota, who  have  succeeded  in  this  way  is  William  P.  Bayley,  who  is  engaged 
in  the  real-estate,  loan  and  collection  business.  Mr.  Bayley  is  a  native  of 
St.  Lawrence  county.  New  York,  having  been  born  in  Massena,  June  [O, 
[857.      lie  is  the  son  of  William   M.  and  Laura  M.    1  Felch)    Parley. 

The  paternal  great-grandfather  of  Mr.  Bayley  was  a  native  of  Ireland 
and  a  farmer  by  occupation,  who  immigrated  to  America  and  settled  in 
Vermont  in  an  early  day.  In  1835  the  family  moved  to  New  York  state. 
The  late  William  M.  Bayley  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  his  wife,  a 
native  of  Vermont,  was  of  Welsh  descent,  her  father  having  been  a  clergy- 
man, who  was  drowned  at  sea.  William  P.  Bayley  is  the  fourth  child  in 
a  family  of  five  children.  lie  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  received  his  early 
education  in  the  district  schools  of  New  York  state.  When  Mr.  Bayley 
was  sixteen  years  old  he  entered  the  high  school  at  Massena,  where  he  was 
graduated  at  the  age  of  twenty.  In  1878  he  moved  to  Alexandria,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  was  employed    for  two  or  three  years  in  the    farming  imple- 


(ITTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  6j 

nient  business.  In  1883  he  tno.ved  to  Fargo,  North  Dakota,  and  was  there 
employed  by  the  Walter  A.  Woods  Harvester  Company.  For  several  years 
previously,  he  had  been  quietly  yet  persistently  equipping  himself  for  the 
practice  of  law.  In  1886  he  located  in  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  continued 
in  the  study  of  law.  being  admitted  to  the  bar  on  March  22,  1888.  After 
bis  admission  to  the  bar,  Mr.  Bayley  opened  a  law  office  in  Fergus  Falls 
and  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law,  in  the  real-estate,  loan  and  collection 
business.  He  has  a  large  clientage  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  enjoys  a  large, 
prosperous  and  growing  business. 

On  January  31,  1884,  William  P.  Bayley  was  married  to  Amanda  L. 
Stearns,  a  native  of  New  York  state,  having  been  born  at  Louisville,  New 
York.  Mrs.  Bayley  is  the  daughter  of  A.  C.  Stearns,  a  scion  of  an  old 
Fnglish  family.  After  her  graduation  from  the  high  school,  Mrs.  Bayley 
attended  the  Lawrenceville  Academy  and  then  taught  school  in  the  state 
of  Xew  York  until  the  time  of  her  marriage.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bayley  have 
one  son,  Charles  S.,  who  was  born  on  June  12,  1885,  at  Alexandria,  Minne- 
sota. 

William  P.  Bayley  is  a  Democrat  in  politics  and  was  a  member  of  the 
city  council  of  Fergus  Falls  for  several  years  and  a  delegate  to  the  Kansas 
City  convention,  which  nominated  William  J.  Bryan  for  the  presidency. 
In  iqoo  Mr.  Bayley  was  chairman  of  the  Democratic  county  central  com- 
mittee of  Otter  Tail  county.  He  is  one  of  the  active  and  progressive  men 
and  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls  and  is  interested  in  everything  which  pertains 
to  the  development  of  this  great  county. 


ROBERT  HANNAH. 


The  Co-operative  Building  Association,  while  not  an  institution  pecu- 
liar to  America,  has  served  a  splendid  purpose  in  the  material  development 
of  this  great  country.  It  has  served  an  especially  valuable  purpose  in  the 
development  of  the  great  state  of  Minnesota  and  especially  Otter  Tail  coun- 
ty. Among  the  men  who  now  live  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  who  are  prom- 
inent in  the  administration  of  building  associations  is  Robert  Hannah,  of 
Fergus  Falls,  a  native  of  Scotland,  who,  aside  from  his  interests  in  various 
building  associations,  is  personally  engaged  in  the  farm  loan  and  mortgage 
business. 

Robert  Hannah  was  born  at  Ayrshire.  Scotland,  in  i860,  and  is  the 
son  of  John  and  Mary  (Miller)  Hannah,  both  of  whom  are  deceased.  Mr. 
Hannah's  father  was  a  farmer  in  Scotland.  He  was  reared  on  the  farm 
and  received  his  education  at  the  Ayr  Academy. 

In  1882  Robert  Hannah  immigrated  to  America.  After  arriving  in 
this  country,  he  came  west  to  Minneapolis,  where  be  remained  for  one  year. 


68  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY..    MINNESOTA^ 

Subsequently,  he  became  inspector  of  western  farm  mortgages  for  the  Globe 
Investment  Company,  at  Boston.  During  the  period  of  eight  or  nine  years 
when  he  was  associated  with  the  Globe  Investment  Company,  Air.  Hannah 
also  had  offices  in  Kansas  City,  Missouri,  and  at  other  places. 

On  January  2,  1892,  Mr.  Hannah  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and  engaged 
in  his  present  business.  He  not  only  handles  farm  mortgages,  but  he  is 
secretarv  of  the  Northwestern  Building  Association,  an  incorporation 
organized  in  1904.  Moreover,  he  was  secretary  of  the  Otter  Tail  Building 
and  Loan  Association,  organized  in  1895.  These  concerns  have  been  instru- 
mental in  building  up  many  towns  in  Otter  Tail  county,  and,  in  fact,  in  the 
surrounding  country,  because  they  have  furnished  a  liberal  supply  of  money 
on  easy  terms  to  men  who  were  interested  in  the  development  of  this  county. 

Robert  Hannah's  wife,  before  her  marriage,  was  Mary  Ely,  a  native 
of   Northfield,  Vermont,  and  to  them  has  been  born  one  daughter.  Louise. 

Mr.  Hannah  is  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank,  of  Fergus  Falls. 


GEORGE  O.  WELCH,  M.D. 

The  state  of  Minnesota  takes  great  pride  in  the  character  of  and  admin- 
istration of  its  public  institutions.  An  important  feature  of  the  efficient 
management  of  the  state  institutions  of  Minnesota  consists  in  the  long 
tenure  of  its  administrative  officers,  who  have  proved  themselves  qualified 
for  the  positions  they  fill.  Institutional  management  in  many  states  has 
been  inefficient  merely  because  capable  men  have  been  sacrificed  for  politics. 
Fortunately,  this  is  not  the  case  in  Minnesota.  Dr.  George  O.  Welch,  the 
superintendent  of  the  state  hospital  at  Fergus  Falls,  was  appointed  to  his 
present  position  in  1892.  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century  ago.  Having  ably 
discharged  the  duties  of  this  responsible  position,  he  has  since  continued  in 
office  from  year  to  year  regardless  of  the  varying  fortunes  of  politics. 

Doctor  Welch  is  a  man  who  was  well  trained  not  only  for  the  technical 
aspects  of  his  office,  but  for  the  general  aspects  as  well.  He  is  a  native  of 
Boston,  Massachusetts,  the  son  of  Charles  W.  and  Angenora  (Hawes) 
Welch.  Doctor  Welch  received  a  common-school  education  in  Boston  and 
was  graduated  from  the  historic  select  school,  Chauncy  Hall,  in  Boston. 
He  began  his  career  in  the  office  of  the  Old  Colony  Railroad  Company  and 
remained  with  the  company  for  five  years,  after  which  he  entered  the  Boston 
University  Medical  School  to  prepare  himself  for  the  practice  of  medicine. 
After  being  graduated  from  this  institution,  he  occupied  a  subordinate  posi- 
tion in  the  state  hospital  at  Westboro.  Massachusetts,  for  five  years  and 
then  spent  one  year  in  Europe  in  special  work  pertaining  to  special  features 
of  his   profession.     In    1892   Doctor   Welch   was   appointed    superintendent 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  69 

of  the  Minnesota  state  hospital  at  Fergus  Falls  and  has  held  this  position 
continuously  ever  since.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  hav- 
ing joined  this  historic  order  in  South  Boston,  but,  upon  coming  to  Minne- 
sota, became  affiliated  with  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99. 

Dr.  George  O.  Welch  was  married  to  Phoebe  M.  Lyon,  the  daughter 
of  James  W.  and  Harriett  (Crandall)  Lyon,  and  to  them  has  been  born  one 
son,  Geoffrey  W. 


OTTO  M.  HAUGAX.  M.D. 

Among  the  very  prominent  physicians  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
and  especially  of  Fergus  Falls  and  vicinity,  is  Dr.  Otto  M.  Haugan,  a  native 
of  South  Dakota,  where  he  was  born  on  a  farm  on  May  7,  1868. 

After  having  lived  in  the  state  of  South  Dakota  until  he  was  fifteen 
years  old,  Otto  M.  Haugan  entered  the  Red  Wing  Seminary  in  1887  and 
nine  years  later  was  graduated  from  the  University  of  Minnesota  with  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  the  meantime  he  was  elected  superintendent 
of  the  schools  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  served  in  this  position  from  1895 
until  1898.  In  1902  he  was  graduated  from  the  medical  department  of 
Northwestern  University  at  Evanston,  receiving  the  degree  of  Doctor  of 
Medicine. 

Since  1902  Doctor  Haugan  has  been  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  pro- 
fession in  Fergus  Falls.  Here  he  has  built  up  a  large  and  profitable  prac- 
tice, but  he  is  quite  as  well  known  in  the  public  affairs  of  Otter  Tail  county 
as  in  the  medical  profession.  Doctor  Haugan  is  a  member  of  the  American 
and  Minnesota  State  Medical  Associations,  and  of  the  Park  Region  Medi- 
cal Society. 


AXCEL  C.  BAKER.  M.D. 

Prominent  in  the  medical  profession  of  Fergus  Falls,  Otter  Tail  coun- 
ty, Minnesota,  is  Dr.  Axcel  C.  Baker,  who  is  a  native  of  Rochester,  Minne- 
sota, and  the  son  of  Ole  and  Lena  (Olson)  Baker. 

Doctor  Baker's  father  and  mother  came  to  America  about  1870  and 
located  near  Rochester,  Minnesota,  where  the  father  operated  a  hardware 
store  for  several  years.     He  is  now  living  retired. 

Axcel  C.  Baker  obtained  his  early  education  at  Rochester,  Minnesota. 
Afterward,  he  attended  the  University  of  Minnesota  and  was  graduated 
from  the  academic  department  in  1807.  lie  made  a  splendid  record  at  the 
University  of  Minnesota  and  one  of  which  he  has  every  reason  to  lie  very 
proud.  After  finishing  the  academic  work  at  the  University  of  Minnesota, 
where  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor    of    Arts.    Dr.    Baker    attended 


■JO  OTTER     1A1I     COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Northwestern  University  Medical  School,  at  Chicago,  and  was  graduated 
from  that  institution  in   1901,  receiving  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  .Medicine. 

After  spending  two  years  in  the  Wesley  hospital,  at  Chicago,  as  an 
intern,  he  came  to  Fergus  Falls  in  1903  and  here  engaged  in  the  practice  oi 
medicine.  During  the  past  twelve  years  his  practice  has  steadily  increased 
and  he  now  enjoys  a  large  and  prosperous  patronage. 

By  Doctor  Baker's  marriage  to  Catherine  Hudson,  the  daughter  of 
Thomas  C.  and  Eliza  Hudson,  there  have  been  horn  four  children,  Norman 
H.,  Katheryn,  Charles  E.  and  Mary. 

Doctor  Baker  is  prominent  in  the  Masonic  circles  of  Fergus  halls. 
l>eing  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Park  Region  Medical  Society,  the  Minnesota  State  Medical  Association  and 
the    American  Medical  Association. 


FRANK  N.  WHITTAKER,  D.D.S. 

One  of  the  best-known  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  and  the  first  college-trained  dentist  to  locate  in  Fergus  Falls,  is 
Dr.  Frank  N.  Whittaker,  a  native  of  Minneapolis,  where  he  was  born  on 
May  16,  1869.  Doctor  Whittaker's  father,  who  is  still  living  at  Llanerch, 
a  suburb  of  Philadelphia,  was  one  of  two  children  born  to  his  parents.  The 
other  was  Charles  Whittaker,  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  who  died  in 
Minneapolis.  Doctor  Whittaker's  mother,  who  before  her  marriage  was 
Helen  Noble,  and  who  was  his  father's  second  wife,  came  from  a  distin- 
guished pioneer  family  of  Minneapolis,  her  parents  having  settled  on  the 
present  site  of  the  Hennepin  county  court  house.  Mrs.  Helen  (Noble) 
Whittaker  was  one  of  three  children  born  to  her  parents.  She  had  two 
brothers.  James  and  John  11..  the  latter  of  whom  was  a  thirty-third-degree 
Mason,  who  died  in  the  city  of  Minneapolis.  Many  years  ago  Doctor 
Whittaker's  father  removed  from  the  state  of  Minnesota  to  Delaware 
county,  Pennsylvania  After  living  in  Minneapolis  for  a  time  he  had 
removed  to  Minnetonka  Fake,  near  Minneapolis,  where  for  a  time  he  owned 
a  farm.  Later  he  owned  a  small  farm  in  Virginia,  where  he  lived  for  a 
few  years  and  then  removed  to  Delaware  county,  Pennsylvania,  settling  at 
Llanerch,  a  suburb  of  Philadelphia,  where  he  now  lives  retired  with  his 
son  Robert,  a  child  by  his  third  marriage.  Doctor  Whittaker's  mother  died 
in  1872  and  his  father  later  was  married  to  a  Miss  Jennings,  who  is  now 
deceased. 

Born  and  reared  in  Minneapolis.  Minnesota,  Frank  X.  Whittaker 
attended  the  public  schools  of  Minneapolis  and  later  spent  two  wars  m  the 
Minneapolis  high  school.  After  the  high  school  curse  lie  entered  the 
department  of  dentistry  at  tin-  University  of  Minnesota  and  was  graduated 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  J I 

in  the  class  of  1893.  After  his  graduation  Doctor  Whittaker  removed  to 
Fergus  Falls  and  for  eight  months  was  employed  in  the  dental  office  of  Dr. 
R.  H.  Phalon.  After  working  for  Doctor  Phalon  for  eight  months  Doctor 
Whittaker  bought  his  office  and  began  the  practice  of  his  profession  on  his 
own  responsibility  on  February  1,  1894.  Altogether  he  has  practiced  den- 
tistry in  Otter  Tail  county,  .Minnesota,  for  a  little  more  than  twenty  years 
and  during  this  period  has  given  his  time  exclusively  to  his  profession,  hav- 
ing built  up  a  large  patronage  in  this  county.  He  is  known  here  not  only 
as  a  skilful  dentist,  but  as  one  of  the  leading  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

In  1898  Doctor  Whittaker  was  married  to  Mrs.  Jessie  Crippen,  a  native 
of  Wisconsin  and  a  daughter  of  Col.  O.  McFarland,  who  immigrated  to 
Otter  Tail  county  in  1X80  and  purchased  a  farm  on  the  shore  of  Ten  Mile 
lake,  where  he  lived  until  his  death.  Doctor  and  Mrs.  Whittaker  have  no 
children. 

The  Whittakers  arc  members  of  the  Episcopal  church  of  Fergus  Falls 
and  Doctor  Whittaker  is  a  vestryman  in  the  church.  He  is  a  Republican 
in  politics,  but  has  never  aspired  to  office.  All  in  all,  it  may  be  said  that 
Dr.  Frank  N.  Whittaker  is  one  of  those  professional  men  and  citizens  whom 
many  communities  delight  to  honor.  He  has  worthily  discharged  his  duties 
as  a  professional  man  and  a  citizen.  Not  only  is  he  well  known  throughout 
Otter  Tail  county  and  especially  Fergus  Falls  and  vicinity,  but  is  popular 
wherever  known. 


JAMES  H.  BELL. 


The  firm  of  Maire  &  Bell  is  well  known  in  the  business  and  commercial 
life  of  Fergus  Falls  and  is  one  of  the  leading  hardware  companies  in  this 
section  of  the  state.  The  secretary  of  the  firm  is  James  H.  Bell,  who  is  a 
native  of  New   York  state. 

James  H.  Bell  was  born  in  the  town  of  Dexter,  Jefferson  county,  New 
York,  January  10,  1854,  and  is  the  son  of  William  and  Betsy  (Seeber)  Bell. 
Mr.  Hell's  father  and  mother  were  born  in  New  York  state.  His  grand- 
father and  his  grandmother  were  natives  of   Ireland. 

James  II.  Bell  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  and  obtained  his  educa- 
tion in  his  native  town.  After  growing  to  manhood  he  taught  school  in 
New  York  state,  but  in  February,  t88i,  came  west  to  Fergus  Falls  and 
purchased  land  in  Buse  township,  where  he  carried  on  farming  until  1894, 
when  he  engaged  in  the  hardware  business  in  Fergus  Falls  in  partnership 
with  Mr.  Maire. 

By  Mr.  Bell's  marriage  i"  Clara  J.  Wiley,  the  daughter  of  Jefferson 
Wiley,  there  have  been  born  two  children,  William  J.  and  Clara  I..  Mr-. 
Bell    died    on    October    10,    1912.     Of   their   two   children,    William    J.    was 


•/2  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Fergus  Falls.  He  attended  the  Princeton 
Theological  Seminary,  at  Princeton,  New  Jersey,  and  is  now  a  missionary 
of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  is  stationed  at  Virginia,  Minnesota.  Rev- 
erend Piell  was  married  to  Helen  Hunt,  of  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  Clara  L. 
Bell  resides  at  home  with  her  father. 


TOHX  P.  HAWK. 


One  of  the  oldest  merchants  in  point  of  continuous  business  activity  in 
the  history  of  Fergus  Falls,  [Minnesota,  is  John  P.  Haave,  who  was  born 
twenty-five  miles  east  of  Trondhjem,  Norway.  January  14.  1S39.  the  son 
of  Peter  and  Solo  (Floren)  Haave.  the  former  of  whom  was  a  farmer  in 
Norway.     Both  parents  died  in  Norway. 

In  1867  John  P.  Haave  and  wife  emigrated  to  America,  and  after 
landing  on  the  Atlantic  seaboard  the  family  came  west,  locating  in  Wana- 
mingo  township,  Goodhue  county,  .Minnesota,  where  John  P.  Haave  farmed 
for  a  year.  During  the  remaining  three  years  111  which  he  lived  in  Goodhue 
county,  he  was  occupied  with  various  kinds  of  work.  In  1871  he  removed 
to  Fergus  Falls.  Minnesota,  where  he  worked  during  the  summer  months 
111  a  saw-mill,  and  in  the  winter  months  in  a  blacksmith  shop.  This  period 
of  his  life  covered  altogether  eight  years. 

In  1884.  in  company  with  Olive  Haave,  Mr.  Haave  purchased  the  gro- 
cery store  of  John  Halbeerg,  and  this  partnership  arrangement  continued 
for  eight  or  nine  months,  when  John  P.  Haave  stated  to  his  partner  that 
there  was  not  enough  in  the  business  for  both  of  them,  that  he  would  with- 
draw his  capital  and  pay  for  what  groceries  his  family  had  used  in  addition 
and  ask  nothing  for  his  services  during  the  period  of  eight  or  nine  months. 
Olive  Haave  declined  to  agree  to  this  arrangement,  but  after  a  few  days' 
deliberation  he  also  offered  to  withdraw  from  the  concern,  which  he  did. 
This  was  in  1X84.  and  since  that  period  John  P.  Haave  has  continued  in 
business  in  Fergus  Falls.  His  first  store  was  located  on  the  present  site 
of  the  office  of  the  Urgblad.  In  [888  Mr.  Haave  moved  to  his  present 
location  under  the  Riverside  flats. 

\,,t  onlj  lias  fohn  P.  Haave  been  successful  in  business,  but  he  has 
also  liven  successful  m  the  political  life  of  the  county.  He  served  as  county 
commissioner  of  <  >tter  Tail  county  from  [896  to  1000.  and  has  held  various 
municipal  and  local  offices,  for  many  years  Mr.  Haave  has  been  a  trus- 
tee of  the  Park  Region  Lutheran  College,  and  is  a  devoted  and  earnest 
member  of  the  Lutheran  church,  to  the  support  of  which  he  is  a  liberal 
contributor. 

Since  coming  t>>   Fergus   Palls.   Minnesota,   Mr.    Haave  has   witnessed 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  73 

many  important  changes,  not  only  in  the  material  development  of  this  city 
and  county,  but  in  the  personnel  of  its  citizens.  Today  he  ranks  as  a  good 
man  and  a  good  citizen,  and  is  well  and  favorably  known  throughout  Otter 
Tail  county. 


HENRY  A.  WINTHER. 


One  of  the  prosperous  commercial  concerns  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minne- 
sota, is  the  John  A.  A.  Winther  &  Son,  dealers  in  lumber  and  building 
material,  of  which  Henry  A.  Winther  is  the  junior  partner. 

Henry  A.  Winther,  a  native  of  Cold  Spring,  Stearns  county,  .Minne- 
sota, was  born  on  January  12,  1875.  He  is  the  son  of  John  A.  A.  and 
Eline  (Hanson)  Winther,  the  former  of  whom  was  born  on  June  11,  1836, 
in  Denmark,  and  who  in  1 86 1 .  when  twenty-live  years  old,  immigrated  to 
America,  landing  in  New  York  city.  Subsequently  he  came  west  to  Minne- 
apolis,  where  he  followed  the  cooper's  trade  for  a  time.  He  then  removed 
to  Nashville,  Tennessee,  during  the  War  of  the  Rebellion  and  was  there 
obliged  tn  employ  Southern  sympathizers  whether  he  desired  or  not.  After 
the  war  he  returned  to  Denmark  on  account  of  the  death  of  his  father  and 
remained  in  his  native  land  for  two  years.  Upon  his  return  to  America  he 
settled  at  Cold  Spring,  Stearns  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  took  charge  of 
the  lumber  business  owned  by  Waite,  Clarke  &  McClure.  After  living 
at  (old  Spring  for  five  years,  in  March,  1880,  Mr.  Winther  came  to  Fergus 
Falls,  Minnesota,  and  the  following  year,  in  company  with  B.  A.  Clarke, 
engaged  in  the  lumber  business.  Subsequently,  however,  he  sold  out  to 
Mr.  Clarke. 

In  1883  John  A.  A.  Winther  opened  a  lumber  yard  at  Elizabeth,  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota.  This  yard  is  still  in  operation.  In  1890  he  pur- 
chased the  lumber  yard  of  Edward  Mc<  iullough,  in  Fergus  Falls,  and  this 
yard  is  also  still  in  operation  and  is  managed  by  Henry  A.  Winther,  the 
junior  partner,  who  became  associated  in  the  business  in  1899. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  A.  A.  Winther  were  the  parents  of  six  children, 
namely:  Henry  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch:  Mary  K.,  who  is  now  Mrs. 
George  W.  Savage  and  who  resides  in  Towa :  August  A.,  who  married  Annie 
llanert:  Bates  C,  who  is  engaged  with  his  brother,  August  A.,  in  the  fruit 
growing  business  at  Lindsay.  California:  Arnold  S,  who  is  in  the  mining 
business  in   Utah;  and   William,  an  electrician  of   Fresno,   California. 

Henry  A.  Winther  was  married  in  kji.)  in  Eva  1\.  Huxmann,  of 
Minneapolis.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Winther  have  one  child,  Henry  A..  Jr.,  born 
mi  September  4.  1915.  Mr.  Winther'-  parents  make  their  home  in  Los 
Angeles,  California,  on  accounl  of  the  severit)  of  the  Minnesota  climate. 
I'lie  California  climate  agrees  with  them  much  better  at  their  time  of  lite 


JOHN    II.  GRASS. 

\s  president  oi  the  Grass  Clothing  <  ompany,  of  Fergus  Kalis,  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota.  John  II.  Grass  is  a  conspicuous  figure  in  the  busi- 
ness life  of  Fergus  Falls  and  Otter  Tail  county.  He  is  the  founder  of  the 
business  which  now  bears  his  name  and  with  which  for  more  than  thirty- 
five  years  he  has  been  connected. 

John  II  Grass,  a  native  of  Walworth  county,  Wisconsin,  where  he 
was  born  on  March  i,  1850,  is  the  son  of  Vnthony  and  Catherine  (  Noblet) 
Grass,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Alsace,  then  a  province  of  France. 
Anthony  Grass's  parents  were  Joseph  and  Barbara  Grass,  who  came  to 
America  when  Anthony  was  twelve  years  old.  They  located  in  Detroit, 
Michigan,  where  the  father  engaged  in  manufacturing  boots  and  shoes. 
Later,  however,  he  sold  out  the  boot  and  shoe  business  and  engaged  in 
farming  in  the  state  of  Michigan.  He  remained  on  the  farm  until  [844, 
when  the  family  removed  to  Wisconsin,  settling  at  Spring  Prairie  in  Wal- 
worth county,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  the  remainder  of  his  life.  Jos- 
eph Grass,  the  paternal  grandfather  of  John  II..  was  one  of  the  progressive 
men  of  Ins  time  as  well  as  a  most  skilful  and  successful  farmer.  Both  lie 
and  his  wife  lived  to  advanced  ages.  Joseph  Grass  died  at  the  aye  of 
eighty-six  and  his  wife  at  the  age  of  eight-one  years.  They  had  four  chil- 
dren, of  whom  Mr.  Grass's  father.  Anthony,  was  the  first  born.  The  other 
children  were  Barbara,  Abbie  and  Rosabelle. 

Anthony  Grass  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Wisconsin,  where  he 
remained  until  1N60.  when  he  removed  to  Racine  county.  Wisconsin,  pur- 
chasing two  hundred  acres  (,f  land  By  his  marriage  to  Catherine  Noblet, 
there  were  horn  nine  children,  of  whom  John  II.  was  the  fourth.  Nichols, 
the  first  horn,  is  deceased.  The  others  were  Abbie,  Catherine,  \nnie.  Jos- 
1  ph,    h  rank".   Julia  and    Edward. 

John  11.  Grass  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  state  of  Wis- 
consin and  at  Rochester  \cademy.  He  also  attended  the  Burlington  high 
school,  but  quit  school  when  eighteen  years  old  to  engage  in  the  mercantile 
business  at  Burlington,  Wisconsin,  where  he  worked  as  a  clerk  for  four 
vears.  \fterward  he  went  to  Elkhorn,  Wisconsin,  and  managed  a  store 
owned  by  his  former  employer,  Joseph  Crane.  There  he  remained  for 
three  years,  when,  in  company  with   B.  C.   Drake,  he  purchased  a  stock  of 

g Is  and  operated  a  -tore  in  partnership  with  Mr.    Drake   for  a  year  and 

li       He  1 1  m  n  -..Id  out   to  his  partner. 

In     1879    Mr.    Grass   came   to    Fergus    Falls,    Minnesota,    and    commenced 

business  with  Osmer  C.  Chase.     Subsequently  Mr.  Chase  sold  out  his  inter- 
est     11    the   mercantile   business   to   a    Mr.    ('.rant    and   in    1 SS  1    the    linn   name 
changed  to  Grass,   Morrison  &  Grain.     This  partnership  arrangement 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  J^, 

continued  until  1890,  when  Mr.  Grass  and  partners  split  up  the  store.  One 
took  the  groceries,  one  took  the  dry  goods  and  Mr.  Grass  took  the  clothing- 
department.  He  conducted  the  business  alone  until  February  15,  1 9 1 5 . 
when  it  was  incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  Grass  Clothing  Company 
The  incorporators  were  J.  H.  Grass.  St.,  and  J.  H.  Grass,  Jr. 

In  [876,  some  three  years  before  coming  to  Minnesota,  John  H.  Grass 
was  married  to  Adella  Silvernail.  of  Waukesha  county,  Wisconsin.  Mrs. 
Grass  is  the  daughter  of  Peter  Silvernail  and  has  borne  her  husband  two 
sons,  Charles  F.  and  John  H.,  Jr.  The  former  married  Christianna  Larson 
and  they  have  two  children.  Harriett  and  Alice.  The}-  reside  in  the  state 
of  .Montana.  John  II.  Grass,  Jr.,  is  associated  with  his  father  in  the  Grass 
(  lothing  ( Company. 

In  addition  to  the  mercantile  business  which  hears  his  name.  John  II. 
Grass  is  also  a  most  successful  farmer.  He  owns  two  splendid  farms  in 
Orwell  township,  to  which  he  gives  considerable  attention.  He  is  especially 
interested  in  breeding  Guernsey  cattle  and  Percheron  horses. 

Mr.  Grass  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and 
the   Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  FJks. 


DAVID  M.  BROWN. 


One  of  the  thriving  industries  of  Fergus  Falls,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  is  the  Fergus  Casket  Works,  of  which  David  M.  Brown  has 
been  secretary  and  executive  officer  since  its  organization  in  [897.  Not 
only  has  he  been  prominent  in  the  industrial  life  of  Otter  Tail  county,  but 
lie  has  likewise  been  prominent  in  the  civic  and  political  life,  having  served 
at  one  time  as  mayor  of  Fergus  Falls  and  as  a  member  of  the  Fergus  Falls 
council. 

David  M.  Brown  is  a  native  of  Vblney,  Oswego  county,  Ww  York, 
where  he  was  born  on  October  '1.  [857.  lie  is  the  son  of  David  L.  and 
Harriet  (Harris)  Brown,  tin-  former  of  whom  during  liis  active  career 
was  a  successful  farmer.  Fie  is  now  living  retired  in  New  York  state. 
Mr.  Brown's  mother  passed  away  in  the  Empire  state  in  1900.  There  were 
six  children   in  the   family,    four  of  whom   are  still   living. 

David  M.  Brown  received  In-  early  education  in  Fulton,  Oswego  coun- 
ty. New  York,  and  at  Mexico  Academy.  While  he  was  still  a  lad  in  his 
teens  and  while  his  education  was  still  incomplete,  he  took  up  salesmanship 
and  worked  during  the  evenings  and  summers  and  on  Saturdays  selling 
fruit  tree-  for  a  large  nursery.  Later  he  taughl  school  during  the  winter 
months    for   several    terms. 

In  [882  Mr.  Brown  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and  with  Leonard  \nu-s.  of 
Oswego,   \'cw    York,  and  Geo.  G.  French,  of  Mexico,  New  York,  together 


j6  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

with  Charles  J.  Wright,  of  Fergus  Falls  (the  firm  name  being  Ames, 
French  &  Company),  three  thousand  acres  of  land  were  acquired,  of  which 
fifteen  hundred  acres  was  farm  land.  The  farm  land  was  located  at 
French,  Carlisle  township,  and  the  timber  land  in  the  township  of  Dora, 
Otter  Tail  count}'.  This  company  was  organized  for  the  specific  purpose 
of  cultivating  the  land  for  profit  and  eventually  selling  it.  The  business 
continued  until  18S9.  when  Mr.  Brown  took  up  life  insurance  work,  having 
become  at  that  time  assistant  manager  of  the  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Com- 
pany,  of  New  York  state.  After  holding  this  position  until  1897  -^r- 
Brown  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  Fergus  Casket  Works,  and  became 
the  secretary  and  manager  of  the  concern,  positions  which  he  still  holds. 
He  is  one  of  the  chief  officers  of  this  concern  and  has  had  much  to  do  with 
its  prosperity  and  growth. 

On  December  12.  1883,  David  M.  Brown  was  married  to  Henrietta 
Bisnett,  a  native  of  Fulton.  Xew  York.  They  have  one  son,  David  L.,  who 
is  the  assistant  manager  of  the  Fergus  Casket  Works. 

Mr.  Brown  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons.  Also  he  is  the  exalted  ruler  of  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United 
Workmen  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 


WALTER  B.  WINDSOR. 

One  of  the  largest  industries  in  Otter  Tail  count}-  is  the  manufacture 
of  flour  and  one  of  the  largest  manufacturers  of  Otter  Tail  count}-  is  Wal- 
ter B.  Windsor,  the  secretary  of  the  Fergus  Flour  Mills  Company,  which 
makes  a  specialty  of  manufacturing  flour  from  the  celebrated  "'Park 
Region"  wheat.  The  Fergus  Flour  Mills  Company  is  a  consolidation  of  the 
Otter  Tail  mill  and  the  Fergus  flour-mill. 

Walter  T>.  Windsor  is  a  native  of  Wheatcheif,  Xew  Jersey,  where  he 
was  born  on  November  21,  1850.  He  is  the  son  oi  William  II.  and  Sarah 
(Battin)  Windsor,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  well-known  business  man,  of 
Xew  York  city,  having  been  engaged  there  for  man}-  years  in  the  lire  insur- 
ance business.  1  luring  all  of  this  time,  William  IT.  Windsor  lived  in  Eliza- 
beth, Xew  Jersey.  In  his  later  years,  he  moved  to  the  western  part  of  Xew 
York  state,  where  he  and  his  wife  lived  until  their  deaths. 

Walter  B.  Windsor  received  his  carl\'  education  at  Canaseraga,  Alle- 
gany county,  Xew  York.  Practically  all  of  his  education  was  received  in 
innate  schools.  After  he  had  grown  to  manhood,  he  learned  the  drug- 
gist's trade  in  I  lornellsvillc.  Xew  York,  but  in  1883  immigrated  to  the 
Dakotas  and  after  taking  up  some  land  made  his  headquarter-  at     Aberdeen, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  77 

South  Dakota,  and  engaged  in  the  fire  insurance  business  on  an  extensive 
scale. 

In  August,  1899,  Mr.  Windsor  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and  in  partner- 
ship with  David  A.  Tennant  purchased  the  Otter  Tail  flour-mill,  which  was 
operated  for  one  year.  In  1900  he  purchased  the  Fergus  flour-mill  and 
consolidated  the  two  mills  into  the  Fergus  Flour  Mills  Company.  In  1904 
they  purchased  a  mill  in  Fargo,  North  Dakota,  and  in  1912  they  purchased 
the  Globe  flour-mill  in  Perham,  Otter  Tail  county.  In  addition  to 'their 
consolidated  mill,  they,  therefore,  own  two  additional  mills.  Compara- 
tively, these  three  mills  have  a  large  capacity  and  the  firm  enjoys  a  large 
local  trade  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  does  a  large  business  in  other  parts  of 
the  country.  From  the  very  beginning,  the  business  has  been  a  prosperous 
one  and  its  success  has  been  due  not  only  to  the  wide  knowledge  which  Mr. 
Windsor  has  of  the  milling  business,  but  to  his  relations  with  his  patrons, 
which  have  always  been  of  a  most  cordial  character.  Although  a  prom- 
inent citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Mr.  Windsor  is  a  man  of  most  modest 
and  unassuming  parts. 

In  October,  1891,  Walter  1'..  Windsor  was  married,  in  Faribault.  Min- 
nesota, to  Sarah  Tennant,  a  native  of  St.  Lawrence  count}-,  Xew  York. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Windsor  have  two  children.  Robert  and  Harold,  who  live  at 
home  with  their  parents. 


HORACE   PICKIT. 


The  only  merchant  now  living  in  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  who  was 
in  business  in  this  city  as  long  ago  as  1873,  is  Horace  Pickit,  who  was  born 
in  Edwards,  St.  Lawrence  county,  Xew  York,  in  1842,  and  who  is  the  son 
of  J.  B.  and  Sarah  (Woodcock)   Pickit. 

The  late  T.  B.  Pickit  operated  a  general  store  in  Edwards  for  a  number 
of  years  and  was  postmaster  for  thirty-five  years.  He  was  also  interested 
in  a  large  ax  and  wagon  manufacturing  company  and  held  many  local 
offices.  In  fact,  he  was  the  leading  citizen  of  the  town.  In  1880  he  and 
his  wife  came  west  .to  Fergus  Falls  and  remained  for  a  time,  when  they 
removed  to  Motley,  Morrison  county,  where  he  and  his  wife  lived  until 
their  deaths. 

Horace  Pickit  received  his  early  education  in  the  district  schools  ami 
at  the  academy  at  Gouverneur  and  Pottsdam,  New  York,  after  which  he 
worked  in  his  father's  store.  When  he  was  twenty-one  years  old  he 
engaged  in  business  for  himself  in  Edwards  until  1872,  when  he  made  a 
pleasure  trip  to  California.  On  August  9,  1873,  Mr.  Pickit  came  to  Fer- 
gus Falls.     His  brother  was  already  here  in  business  and  they  entered  into 


70  OTTER   TA UN  IV.     MINNESOTA. 

partnership  under  the  firm  name  of  Pickit  Brothers,  which  continued  for 
five  years,  when  they  dissolved.  Horace  Pickit  then  operated  the  business 
alone. 

A  few  years  later  Horace  Pickit  built  a  large  brick  building  on  the 
southeast  corner  of  Mill  street  and  Lincoln  avenue,  and  in  this  building 
operated  a  furnishing  goods  store  on  the  .Mill  street  side.  A  Mr.  Moore 
operated  a  dry-goods  store  facing  on  Lincoln  avenue. 

In  [890  Mr.  Pickit  became  the  postmaster  of  Fergus  balls  under  the 
administration  of  President  Cleveland  and  at  the  next  door  mi  Mill  street, 
north,  conducted  a  tailor  ship  and  later  a  furnishing  goods  -tore.  Subse- 
quently, however,  he  sold  out  and  put  in  a  line  of  cigar-,  taking  at  the  -ante 
time  the  agency  for  the  Northern  Express  Company,  which  agency  Mr. 
Pickit  still  has. 

Main  vears  ago  Mr.  Pickit  was  married  to  Celinda  E.  Peck,. by  whom 
two  children  have  been  horn,  both  of  whom  died  in  infancy.  Mr.  Pickil 
i-  an  affable  gentleman  and   is  highly  respected  by   the  citizens  of  this  city. 


|()11X  W.  PETERS!  )N. 


\mong  the  many  residents  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  who  arc  natives 
of  Sweden  and  who  have  been  successful  in  their  adopted  country,  i-  John 
VV.  Peterson,  the  present  superintendent  of  the  electric  lighl  plant  at  Fer- 
gus  Falls. 

John  VV.  Peterson  was  born  in  the  southern  part  of  Sweden  on  July  31, 
[858.  and  is  the  son  of  Peter  and  Hannah  (Nelson)  Peterson,  in  1 S 7 5 
the  family  came  to  America  and.  after  moving  to  Chippewa  county,  Minne- 
sota, settled  near  what  i-  now  the  village  of  Maynard  There  the  father 
homesteaded  a  tract  of  land  which  he  operated  and  where  he  lived  until  his 
death. 

John  VV.  Peterson  received  Ins  early  schooling  in  his  native  land  and 
in  America,  lie  attended  the  public  schools  of  Granite  balls,  Minnesota, 
and  of  Litchfield,  in  Meeker  county.  After  finishing  hi-  education  he  was 
first  employed  in  a  -lore  in  Litchfield  for  one  year  and  then  went  to  Minne- 
apolis, where  he  wa-  able  to  obtain  a  position  with  the  Swan  &  Bush  Elec- 
tric Company.  In  the  meantime  Mr.  Peterson  attended  ni-lu  school,  where 
he  studied  electricity,  in  order  to  better  equip  himself  for  hi-  business. 
\fter  six  month-  he  wa-  employed  by  the  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  Gas  Light 
Company,  and  wa-  associated  with  that  compam  for  four  years.  Mr.  Peter 
1. ii  Hun  operated  the  power  house  for  eighteen  month-,  which  is  located  in 
Fan  Claire.  Wisconsin.  lie  then  came  to  Little  ball-,  where  be  was 
emploved  by  the  Little  Falls   Lower  and  Light  Company  for  five  years. 

In   iSqe,  Mr.    Peterson  came  to  Fergus   Falls  a-  superintendent  of  the 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  ~<  I 

electric  light  plant  of  this  city,  a  position  which  he  has  creditably  filled  dur- 
ing a  period  of  many  years. 

By  Mr.  Peterson's  marriage  to  Ellen  Benson  there  has  been  horn  one 
daughter,  Florence  K..  who  lives  at  home  with  her  parents;  a  son.  William 
Edwin,  died  at  the  age  of  sixteen  months. 

Mr.  Peterson  is  a  member  of  the  Minnesota  Electrical  Association  and 
i-  prominent  in  the  civic  life  of  his  home  town.  He  is  well  known  in 
Fergus  Falls  and  is  highly  respected  by  all  of  the  people  with  whom  he  has 
o  >mc  in  contact. 


WATSON   T.   BEL] 


Among  the  active  business  men  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  who  have 
been  connected  with  the  business  life  of  the  city  for  man}-  years  and  who,  as 
the  proprietor  of  a  popular  grocery,  enjoys  a  large  and  lucrative  patronage, 
is  Watson  T.  Bell.  Mr.  Bell  deserves  to  be  considered  as  one  of  the  pioneers 
of  Fergus  Falls  and  Otter  Tail  county.  He  is  prominent  in  the  fraternal 
circles  of  the  city  and  is  otherwise  well  known  in  this  section  of  the  state. 

Watson  T.  Bell  was  horn  on  August  14,  [853,  at  SugaT  Creek,  in 
Walworth  county,  Wisconsin,  lie  is  the  son  of  William  and  Adeline  (Fair- 
child)  Bell,  the  former  of  whom  came  to  Wisconsin  from  Cattaraugus 
county.  New  York.  William  Bell  was  a  carpenter  by  trade.  He  emigrated 
in  Walworth  county,  Wisconsin,  at  an  early  date  and  there  followed  his 
trade,  and  it  was  there  that  Watson  T.   Bell  grew  to  manhood. 

Having  learned  the  printer's  trade.  Mr.  Bell  finally  moved  to  Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin,  where,  for  some  time,  he  worked  at  his  trade.  Still  later 
he  moved  to  Chicago,  Illinois,  where  he  was  employed  as  a  type  setter  on 
the  Chicago  Tribww  until  [882.  \t  that  time  Mr.  Bell  moved  to  Fergus 
falls,  Minnesota.  Realizing  that  there  was  an  opportunity  for  a  large 
grocery,  he.  in  partnership  with  Oscar  Brown,  opened  a  retail  grocery  in  the 
Wright   block   on    Hi-mark  avenue,   east,   and   was   in   that    location    for  eighl 


or  1 

nne  years,   when   they   moved   to    Lincoln   avenue,    west,   near   the   presenl 

site 

of  the  Golden   Rule  building,  where,  in  addition  to  groceries,  they  car- 

ried 

a  large  line  of  ylass  and  crockery. 

In  [ 002  the  partnership  between  Mr.  Hell  and  Mr.  Brown  was  dissolved. 

Mr. 

Bell   moving   at   that   time   to  his  present    location,    114    Lincoln   avenue, 

wesl 

lie  now    deals  exclusively  in  groceries  and   has  a   large  trade,   which 

has 

come  to  him  not  only  because  he   fully   understands  the  needs  of  his  CUS- 

ton* 

.ts,  hut  because  of  his  honorable  and  uprighl  dealings  with  them. 

Mr.    Bell's    wife,    before    her   marriage,    was    Margaret    Gorman,    who 

has 

home  him  one   son,    Dr    George    f...   now    a    well-known   and   successful 

dent 

ist  of  Fergus  falls.     |  >,■    George  E.   Bell  married   Edith   Vfortensen,  the 

So  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

daughter  of  Nels  J.  Mortensen,  a  retired  druggist  of  Fergus  Falls.     Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Ceorge  E.  Bell  have  one  daughter,  Catherine. 

Watson  T.  Bell  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99.  Ancient 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  .Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 


HON.   ELMER  I.LLSWORTH  ADAMS. 

As  the  editor  of  Otter  Tail  county's  leading  newspaper  for  many  years, 
and  as  a  banker  and  business  man.  Hlmer  Ellsworth  Adams  is  one  of  the 
best-known  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county.  His  life  and  career  are  intimately 
identified  with  almost  every  phase  of  the  development  of  this  great  county. 

Elmer  Ellsworth  Adams,  journalist  and  business  man,  is  a  native  of 
Waterburv,  Vermont,  where  he  was  born  on  December  31,  1861,  a  son  of 
Daniel  K.  and  Ann  (Hale)  Adams,  both  of  whom  also  were  natives  of  the 
state  of  Vermont.  Daniel  K.  Adams,  who  originally  was  an  iron  manu- 
facturer, emigrated  to  Minneapolis  in  1879,  and  engaged  in  contract  build- 
ing. His  death  occurred  in  St.  Paul  in  [912,  he  and  his  wife  having  reared 
a  family  of  four  children,  Dayton,  Elmer  E.,  Wilbur  and  Alice. 

Elmer  E.  Adams  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Morrisville, 
Vermont,  and  at  the  University  of  Minnesota,  being  graduated  from  the 
latter  institution  with  the  class  of  1884,  ami  on  the  17th  of  February,  1884, 
arrived  at  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  as  the  editor  of  tin-  Fergus  Fulls  Daily 
Telegram.  In  March,  1885,  the  Telegram  was  consolidated  with  the  Fergus 
Falls  Journal,  and  Mr.  Adams  became  editor  of  the  consolidated  newspaper, 
continuing  in  that  capacity  until  1912,  when  he  was  succeeded  by  W.  L. 
Robertson. 

In  addition  to  the  presidency  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Journal  Company,  a 
position  which  Mr.  Adams  now  holds,  he  is  also  presidenl  of  the  First 
National  Hank,  president  of  the  Northwestern  Building  Association,  and  of 
tin-  Otter  Tail  Loan  Association,  and  secretary  of  the  Rvd  Liver  Milling 
1  1  impany. 

hi  [890  Elmer  E.  Adams  was  supervisor  of  the  federal  census  for  the 
fifth  Minnesota  district,  am!  in  toon  he  was  supervisor  of  the  census  for 
the  seventh  Minnesota  district,  For  many  years  he  was  a  member  of  the 
hoard  ..I'  regents  of  the  University  of  Minnesota. 
member  of  the  state  Legislature  for  four  terms  a 
lower  house  of  the  Minnesota  Legislature  at  the 
at  at  the  University  of  Minnesota  In  was  a 
fraternity. 

In    [890,    Elmer   Ellsworth    Adams  was  marri< 

Rochester,     Minnesota,    and    to    this    union    have    he 


lie 

also 

has  served  as  a 

ltd 

is    a 

membe 

r   of 

the 

pre 

-cut 

time. 

Whi! 

le    a 

mei 

nher 

of  the 

Chi 

Psi 

Ml     t 

0    Fi 

mm    O 

.wles 

.   at 

en 

horn 

three 

child 

ren, 

SWORTH   AIiAAb 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA.  8l 

Marjorie,  Dorothy  Q.  and  Samuel   P.,  all  of  whom  arc  living  at  home  with 
their  parents. 

Mr.  Adams  is  prominent  as  a  member  of  the  Chippewa  Club,  of  Fergus 
Falls.  He  is  a  gentleman  of  wide  information  as  a  banker  and  a  forceful 
newspaper  editor  and  writer,  being  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  most 
forceful  editorial  writers  in  Minnesota.  His  large  success  in  life  has  come 
as  a  natural  consequence  of  his  natural  force  of  character  and  grace  of  per- 
sonality and   he  deserves  to  rank  as  one  of  the   foremost   citizens  of  Otter 

Tail  county,   it  being  reasonabl) tain   that  history   will   accord   to   him   a 

conspicuous  place  in  the  annals  of  this  section  of  the  state. 


RI(  ;l  \RD   I.  ANGUS. 


Richard  J.  Angus,  a  successful  business  man  of  Fergus  Falls.  Minne- 
sota, who  has  been  engaged  in  the  real-estate,  loan  and  insurance  business  in 
this  city  since  1891,  is  a  well-rounded  man  and  citizen.  He  is  popular 
among  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county.  Rarely  does  anything  occur  in 
Fergus  Falls  in  which  he  does  not  take  a  leading  part. 

Richard  J.  Angus,  who  is  a  native  of  Scotland,  was  born  at  Bathgate 
on  February  [6,  1863.  His  father,  the  late  Alexander  Angus,  was  a  mer- 
chant in  the  old  country.  The  family  came  to  America  in  1880,  and  after 
settling  in  Minnesota  engaged  in  farming. 

Educated  at  the  city  of  Bathgate,  Mr.  Angus  later  entered  the  Univer- 
sity cf  Edinburgh,  where  for  some  years  he  was  a  student.  When  Mr. 
Angus  was  nineteen  years  old.  he  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  with 
Miller  &  McMasters,  of  Fergus  Falls,  and  was  employed  by  this  firm  for  a 
period  of  six  years.  It  was  here  that  he  laid  the  foundation  of  the  success 
which  was  ti>  crown  the  efforts  of  his  later  years.  In  1888  Mr.  Angus  went 
tn  Neligh,  Nebraska,  where  he  became  assistant  manager  of  the  Nebraska 
office  of  the  Globe  Investment  Company,  of  Boston.  Massachusetts.  The 
next  year.  [889,  Mr.  Angus  was  transferred  to  the  Kansas  City  office  as 
cashier  of  the  combined  Nebraska  and  Kansas  office-.  Two  years  later. 
in   [891,  he  returned  to  Fergus  Falls  and,  having  already  obtained  .1  good 

Start  in  life,  boughl  OUl  the  real-estate  business  of  F.  \V.  Bumham,  who  had 
succeeded  to  the  business  of  .Miller  &  McMasters.  This  business  has  been 
successfully  earned  mi  for  a  period  of  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century,  and  it 
ha-  given  .Mr.  Angus  an  opportunity  t'>  be  of  real  service  in  the  agricul- 
tural and  commercial  life  of  Otter  Tail  county.  ^mong  his  various  inter- 
ests he  owns  farms  jn  this  county  and  mi  the  White  Earth  reservation,  and 
city  property,  among  which  is  a  third  interest  in  the  Manhattan  building, 
where  his  office  is  located. 
,(,bi 


82  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

.Mr.  Angus  lias  served  several  terms  as  alderman  of  the  fourth  ward 
on  the  city  council  in  Fergus  Falls.  The  gin  id  work  of  Richard  J.  Angus 
floes  not  appear  in  a  brief  statement  of  facts  concerning  his  life's  career, 
llis  ways  of  doing  good  are  so  varied  and  extend  to  so  many  unexpected 
quarters  that  they  cannot  well  be  set  forth  in  this  place,  lie  is,  however, 
one  of  the  "live  wires"  of  Fergus  Falls  and  prominent  in  many  phases  of 
its  life.  Mr.  Angus  is  a  member  of  several  fraternal  and  secret  orders, 
including,  among  others,  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He 
is  also  treasurer  of  the  Federated  church..  No  interest  is  beneath  his  notice 
and  no  interest  exists  in  this  thriving  city  either  too  large  or  too  small  to 
gain  a  part  of  his  attention,  lie  is  fund  of  the  people  of  Fergus  Falls  and 
the  people  are  fond  of  him  and  cherish  the  work  he  has  done  and  is  doing. 


\DIX   NELSON 


Adin  Nelson,  a  well-known  citizen  of  Fergus  Falls.  Minnesota,  and 
the  principal  butter-maker  for  the  Fergus  Co-operative  Creamery  Associa- 
tion, is  a  native  of  East  Union,  Carver  county.  Minnesota,  where  he  was 
horn  on  July  20,  1876.  He  is  the  son  of  Nels  and  Inga  (Anderson)  Nel- 
son, who  had  a  family  of  nine  children.  The  following  children  are  -til! 
living:  Jonah  M..  a  resident  of  Minneapolis ;  Nels  G.,  a  resident  of  Carver 
village;  Mrs.  Christine  Svvanson,  who  lives  in  Carver;  Mrs.  Lena  Scott,  of 
Ionian.  Scott  county,  Minnesota:  Leonard,  who  lives  at  Bemidji ;  and 
Emma,  who  married   llenn    Hotting,  and  lives  at   Bemidji. 

Mr.  Nelson's  father  came  to  America  in  1869  and  his  mother  three 
years  later.  They  settled  in  East  Union,  Carver  county,  Minnesota,  where 
Nels  operated  a  flour-mill  and  where  he  was  the  head  m.iller  for  five  years. 
He  then  purchased  a  farm  and  was  engaged  in  Farming  the  remainder  of 
his  life. 

Adin  Nelson  was  reared  on  the  farm  and  received  his  education  in 
Easl  Union,  Carver  county,  Minnesota.  \fter  completing  his  education  he 
managed  his  father's  farm  for  three  years  after  his  father's  death,  and 
then  found  employment  in  the  creamery  for  a  couple  of  years.  After  he  had 
obtained  a  general  knowledge  of  making  butter,  he  attended  a  dairy-farm 
school  and,  after  completing  his  studies  there,  he  returned  to  Fast  Union 
and  became  butter-maker  for  the  Easl  Union  creamers.  Altogether,  Mr. 
Nelson  was  employed  by  the  Easl   Union  creamery  for  seven  years. 

In  1007  Adin  Nelson  came  to  Fergus  Falls.  Minnesota,  and  has  since 
operated  the  Co-operative  creamery  a1  this  place.  He  is  a  member  o1  the 
Butter-Maker's  Association,  both  Mate  and  national,  and  Vasa  Orden  of 
Fergus   Falls. 

I'.\    Ins  marriage  to    Anna  L.    Arneson,  a  native  of   Easl   I'niou.  Carver 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  83 

county,  Adin  Nelson  has  four  children,  Margaret,  Doris,  Wilma  and 
Hernia.  The  Nelson  family  are  all  members  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran 
church.  They  are  regular  attendants  at  church  services  and  contribute  lib- 
erally to  the  support  of  the  church  in  every  way. 


HERBERT  E.  WEBBER. 

Herbert  E.  Webber,  the  well-known  manager  of  the  E.  J.  Webber 
Company,  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  whose  family  history  is  recounted  in 
the  sketch  of  his  deceased  father,  was  born  on  April  21,  1884.  It  may  be 
said  in  this  connection,  however,  that  his  father,  who  passed  away  in  IQ05, 
was  one  of  the  most  progressive  citizens  in  the  history  of  Fergus  Falls. 

Herbert  E.  Webber  obtained  his  elementary  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Fergus  Falls,  and  after  finishing  the  high  school  course  he 
attended  Northwestern  University,  at  Chicago,  and  was  a  student  there  in 
the  law  department.  Mr.  Webber  expected  to  continue  his  course  in  law 
until  graduation,  but  his  father's  untimely  death,  in  1005,  changed  his  plans 
and  he  returned  home  to  take  up  his  father's  work. 

.Mr.  Webber  has  charge  of  all  of  his  father's  business  and  is  capably 
and  successfully  installed  as  its  manager.  He  is  president  of  the  Fergus 
<  laskel  Works,  a  position  which  his  father  held  at  the  time  of  his  death, 
and  has  many  other  business  responsibilities. 

Herbert  E.  Webber  was  married  on  February  3,  191 5,  to  Rose  Frank- 
oviz,  a  native  of  Fergus  Falls.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Webber  are  popular  in  the 
social  life  of  Fergus  Falls  and  entertain  frequently  at  their  hospitable  and 
comfortable  home  in  this  city.  Mr.  Webber  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 


CHRISTIAN  O.  UTNE. 


Among  the  residents  of  Fergus  halls.  Minnesota,  who  have  been  suc- 
cessful in  its  business  and  commercial  life,  is  Christian  O.  Utne,  the  present 
secretary  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Woolen  Mills  Company,  who  is  a  native  of 
Norway. 

Christian  O.  Utne  was  horn  on  March  23,  1882,  and  is  the  son  of 
Oliver  C.  and  Ellen  Torine  <  Ryan  1  Utne.  The  Utne  family,  consisting  of 
the  father  and  mother  and  five  children,  came  to  .America  in  [886  \  iter 
arriving  on  the  Atlantic  seaboard,  they  came  West  to  Dalton,  ( )tter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  where  the  father  purchased  a  farm  and  on  which  was 
standing  a  small  frame  house.  Later  on  he  built  a  larger  house  There 
were  ten  children  in  the  Utne  Family:  Mattie.  Amanda.  Emma,  who  is 
deceased;  Christian,  who  married   Edith  Suniu,  a  native  of    Whhv  and  the 


84  OTTER      1      H      COl    M'V.     MINNESOTA. 

daughter  of  Andrew  and  Mar)  Sunju,  and  has  two  children,  Ellen  Marie 
and  Dorothy  Isabel;  Sarah;  Andrew  O.  is  a  professor  in  the  Park  Region 
College;  Theodore,  who  is  principal  of  the  high  school  at  Norwood;  form, 
who  lives  on  the  old  farm:  Emma,  who  is  a  teacher  by  profession;  and 
1  >ora,  who  lives  at  home. 

Christian  O.  Utne  received  his  early  education  in  Dane  Prairie.  Later 
he  attended  the  Northwestern  College  at  Fergus  Falls  and  later  Red  Wing 
Seminary  and  Moorehead  State  Normal  School.  After  completing  his 
studies,  he  taught  school  in  different  places  for  seven  years. 

In  1910  Mr.  Utne  became  associated  with  the  management  of  the  Fer- 
gus Falls  "Woolen  Mill  Company,  which  position  he  now  holds.  He  is  a 
successful  business  man  and  a  valuable  citizen,  one  who  takes  a  commendable 
interest  in  public  enterprises  and  worthy  public  movements. 


MARTIN  T.  NELSON. 

Of  the  well-known  business  firms  in  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  there 
may  be  mentioned  the  firm  of  Nelson  &•  Thoreson.  who  operate  two  distinct 
lines  of  business,  the  Fergus  Fuel  Company,  which  deals  in  coal,  lime, 
plaster  and  cement,  and  the  Marble  and  Granite  Works. 

Martin  T.  Nelson,  the  senior  member  of  the  firm  of  Nelson  &  Thore- 
son. was  born  on  November  15,  1873,  and  is  the  son  of  Tollef  and  Marit 
(Larson)  Nelson,  the  former  of  whom  was  born  in  1837  and  who,  in  1856, 
with  his  brother,  sailed  for  America.  Tollef  was  then  but  nineteen  years 
old.  With  his  brother,  he  landed  at  Quebec.  Canada,  and  not  having  enough 
money  to  reach  their  destination  they  borrow-ed  some  and  by  boat  finally 
reached  the  state  of  Michigan,  after  which  they  worked  their  way  several 
hundred  miles,  finally  reaching  Big  Canoe,  Iowa,  where  their  uncle  lived. 
They  remained  with  him  for  a  time  and  then  moved  to  Waseca  county, 
Minnesota,  where  they  worked  a  farm  on  the  shares  for  a  time.  Afterward 
they  came  to  Freeborn  comity  and  also  worked  at  farming  on  the  shares. 
Finally,  they  purchased  a  yoke  of  oxen  and  drove  to  Tumuli  township,  in 
Otter   rail  county,  taking  up  a  homestead  near  the  village  of  Halt. ml     There 

Tollef    Nelson   farmed   until   his  death. 

Tollef  and  Marit  (Larson)  Xelson  were  the  parents  of  twelve  chil- 
dren, four  of  whom  died  in  infancy:  Carrie,  who  is  now  Mrs.  T  0 
Udbye,  of  Fergus  Falls;  Nels  T.  who  is  a  lawyer  and  editor;  [nger,  who 
married  F.  C.  Svensrud,  and  lives  on  a  part  of  the  old  homestead;  Lars, 
who  lives  on  the  homestead  in  Tumuli  township:  Martin  T.,  who  is  the  sub- 
jecl  of  this  sketch:  Anton,  who  is  .1  resident  of  Canada;  Thore  L.  who  is  a 
barber  in  Fergus  Falls;  and  Eline,  who  married  Emil  Brusven. 

Martin  T.    Nelson   was  reared  on  the  home    farm,  and  after  completing 


OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA.  85 

his  education  taught  school  for  two  years  in  Norman  county  and  two  years 
in  Otter  Tail  county.  Afterward  he  engaged  in  the  coal,  lime,  plaster  and 
cenu-nt  business  and.  in  1908,  went  into  the  marble  and  granite  business. 
The  title  of  the  firm  was  originally  Partridge  &  Nelson.  This  partnership 
arrangement  continued  for  one  year,  and  afterward  Mr.  Nelson  was  alone 
until  191 2,  when  he  took  his  present  partner  into  the  business. 

By  his  marriage  to  Gena  Molden,  the  daughter  of  Olie  Molden,  Martin 
T.  Nelson  has  one  son,  Thomas  O.,  who  was  born  ott  September  27,  1907. 

The  firm  of  Nelson  &  Thoreson  has  been  unusually  successful  in  busi- 
ness and  has  succeeded  in  building  up  a  large  trade  and  a  valuable  patronage 
in  this  community.  Much  of  this  success  is  due  to  the  splendid  ability  and 
genial  personality  of  the  senior  member  of  the  firm.  Martin  T.  Nelson. 


LOWELL  I.   LANGNESS. 

Lowell  I.  Langness,  a  well-known  merchant  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Min- 
nesota, who  has  been  engaged  in  business  at  Clitherall  longer  than  any  other 
man  in  the  history  of  the  town,  was  born  at  Rodness,  Smaalennes,  Amt, 
Norway.  August  7.  1864,  and  is  the  son  of  Iver  A.  and  Amelia  (Anderson) 
Langness.  Mr.  Langness'  father  was  born  in  1829  and  his  mother  in  1826. 
They  were  married  in  Norway,  and  after  their  marriage  Iver  A.  Langness 
came  to  America  and  located  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  in  1868.  Two 
years  later  the  family  came  to  America,  and  in  1874  they  settled  in  Leaf 
Mountain  township.  Otter  Tail  county.  Here  the  father  took  a  homestead 
of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  He  cleared  the  land  and  improved  it  in 
many  ways  and  lived  on  this  farm  until  his  death,  in  1901.  His  wife  died 
in  1905.  They  were  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  and 
were  among  the  organizers  of  the  Zoar  congregation.  They  were  active  in 
religious  work  until  the  time  of  their  deaths.  They  were  the  parents  of 
six  children,  of  whom  August  and  Carl  are  deceased.  The  living  children 
are:  Julius,  Lowell  !..  Alava  and  Anna. 

Lowell  I.  Langness  was  educated  in  Leaf  Mountain  township  and  in 
Nidaros  township.  1  [e  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  lived  on  the  farm  until  he 
was  twenty-two  years  old.  when  he  engaged  in  threshing  in  this  count) 
.After  having  been  engaged  in  the  threshing  business  for  three  years  Mr. 
Langness  attended  the  St.  Cloud  Normal  School  and  the  Curtis  Business 
College  al  Minneapolis.  He  came  to  Clitherall  in  the  fall  of  i8gt  and 
engaged  in  the  grain  business  as  a  buyer  for  the  Farmers  Elevator  Com- 
pany. Later  he  built  an  elevator,  hut  sold  out  about  1901  and  moved  to 
North  Dakota,  where  he  took  a  claim  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acre-,  \fter 
proving  up  on  the  claim  he  returned  to  Clitherall,  and  in  the  fall  of  [905 
engaged  in  the  general  mercantile  business.      Mr.   Langness  owns   hi-  own 


86  OTTER     1  \ll      COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

building.  He  has  built  up  a  prosperous  business  and  enjoys  a  large  patron- 
age from  the  farmers  of  this  community. 

On  October  28,  1896,  Lowell  T.  Langness  was  married  to  Minnie 
Nyberg,  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  She  was  born  in  Tintah,  Wilkin 
county,  Minnesota,  in  1875.  and  is  the  daughter  of  Charles  and  Caroline 
Nyberg,  the  former  of  whom  lives  in  Fergus  Falls,  the  latter  being  deceased. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lowell  I.  Langness  have  no  children. 

Mr.  Langness  is  a  member  of  tin-  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  at 
Clitherall.  He  has  been  active  in  the  Farmers  Alliance  and  was  a  delegate 
to  the  national  convention  of  Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  at  Toledo, 
Ohio.  Mr.  Langness  is  independent  in  politics,  but  this  does  not  mean 
that  he  takes  no  part  in  politics.  On  the  contrary,  he  has  always  been  rather 
active.  Mr.  Langness  has  served  as  clerk  of  the  village  and  has  also  served 
on  the  council.  lie  was  township  clerk  for  a  number  of  years.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Langness  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  take  an  active 
interest  in  religious  affairs. 

A  brother  of  Lowell  1.  T^tngness.  Julius  1.  Langness,  who  resides  in 
Nidaros  township,  was  born  in  Norway,  November  t.  1858.  He  was  edu- 
cated in  Norway  and  in  1870  came  to  Goodhue  county.  Minnesota.  Four 
years  later  he  settled  in  Otter  Tail  count}',  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  edu- 
cated principally  in  the  schools  of  this  county.  He  is  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion and  in  1885  purchased  seventy  acres  of  land,  to  which  he  lias  since 
added  until  he  now  owns  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  33.  He 
also  has  eighty  acre  in  section  4,  of  Leaf  Mountain  township. 

Julius  I.  Langness  was  married  in  1885  to  Lelah  Doty,  who  was  born 
in  1864  in  Minnesota,  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Gideon  and  Lucinda 
Doty.  They  now  live  at  Spicer,  Minnesota.  Eleven  children  have  been 
born  to  Mr.  and.  Mrs.  Julius  1.  Langness.  as  follow:  Merrill.  Minnie. 
George,  Cleveland.  Jennie.  Mice,  Vernon,  Maud.  Lawrence.  Lloyd  and  Ray- 
mond. 

Julius  I.  Langness  is  a  general  farmer  and  stockman.  He  has  never 
aspired  to  office. 


OLE  J.  FOSSEN. 

The  proprietor  of  the  popular  Roller  Feed  Mills  on  South  Mill  street, 
of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  Ole  J.  Fossen,  was  horn  at  Throndhjem,  Nor- 
way, and  is  the  son  of  lens  O.  and  Christena  Fossen.  who  came  to  America 
in  1865.  After  landing  on  the  Atlantic  seaboard,  the  family  came  west  to 
Minnesota  and  settled  in  Goodhue  county,  where  they  rented  a  farm  and 
remained  until  [870,  a  period  of  live  years.  In  1870  the  Fossen  family 
removed  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  settled  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  where 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  8/ 

they  homesteaded  a  tract  of  land.  This  farm  was  located  in  section  6. 
There  the  family  erected  a  house  and  continued  to  live  until  about  1900, 
when  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jens  1  >.  Fossen  removed  to  Fergus  Falls.  After  remov- 
ing- to  this  city,  Jens  O.  Fossen  retired  from  active  life. 

Ole  J.  Fossen  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Goodlme  county  and  in  Dane  Prairie  township  of  Otter  Tail  county.  He 
attended  the  old  school  known  as  district  No.  28.  In  1884  Mr.  Fossen  left 
the  home  farm  and  came  into  the  city,  working  for  the  Fergus  Flour  Mill 
Company  for  ten  years.  In  1894  be  purchased  an  interest  in  the  Beardsley 
&  Langley  mill,  and  the  firm  became  known  as  Beardsley  &  Fossen.  It  was 
operated  under  this  name  for  a  period  of  five  years,  when  Mr.  Fossen  pur- 
chased Mr.  Beardsley's  interest  in  the  mill.  Under  the  management  of  Mr. 
Fossen  the  mill  has  been  verv  successful  and  has  done  a  large  business  in 
the  grinding  of  feed  and  the  sale  of  flour  and  feed. 

By  his  marriage  to  Olive  Olson,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fossen  have  had  three 
children,  namely:  George  is  a  civil  engineer  and  resides  at  St.  Paul,  Minne- 
sota ;  Theodore  is  a  bookkeeper  employed  by  the  First  National  Bank,  of 
Fergus  Falls;  Flenry  is  a  graduate  of  the  Fergus  Falls  high  school.  Mrs. 
Fossen  is  a  native  of  Norway.  Aside  from  his  purely  private  business  inter- 
ests. Mr.  Fossen  is  prominent  in  the  fraternal  circles  of  the  city.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Sons  of  Norway  and  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Work- 
men. 


OLAF  J.  SCHEI. 

Prosperous  as  a  merchant  in  the  commercial  life  of  Fergus  Falls,  Min- 
nesota, Olaf  J.  Schei,  who  is  engaged  in  the  retail  sale  of  clothing  and 
furnishing  goods,  is  a  native  of  Kenvon  township,  Goodhue  county.  Minne- 
sota, where  he  was  born  in  1868. 

.Mr.  Schei  is  the  son  of  Johanes  P.  and  Lena  (RosvohH  Schei.  the 
former  of  whom  was  born  in  Yter  Pen,  and  the  latter  born  in  Yerdolm. 
Norway.  Mr.  Schei's  parent-  came  to  America  via  Quebec,  Canada,  in 
[867,  alter  a  voyage  lasting  six  weeks  on  the  Atlantic  ocean.  The  voyage- 
was  made  in  a  sailing  vessel.  After  landing  at  Quebec,  Mr.  Schei's  parents 
came  direct  to  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  settling  near  the  village  of 
kenvon.  Both  father  and  mother  worked  out  on  the  neighboring  farms  the 
first  year,  and  during  the  second  year  they  broke  ground.  In  the  winter 
he  cut  cord  wood  and  broke  ground  in  the  summer.  In  1870  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Johanes  P.  Schei  moved  to  ( )tter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and,  after  locat- 
ing in  Tordenskjold  township,  the]  homesteaded  land  and  still  live  on  this 
farm.      The)    have  reared  a    family  of  ten  children. 

Olaf   I    Schei  received  bis  elementary  education  in  Tordenskjold  town- 


88  OTTER  viv,    MINNES01  \. 

ship  and  was  reared  on  the  home  farm.  In  [89]  he  settled  in  Fergus  Palls, 
entering  the  emplo)  at  thai  time  of  J.  II.  Grass,  the  well-known  clothier. 
There  he  learned  tin-  clothing  nd  after  being  associated  with  Mr. 

Grass  for  seven  and  one-half  years,  in  [899,  engaged  in  the  clothing  busi- 
ness "ii  his  own  responsibility.  Mr.  Schei  has  been  remarkably  successful, 
owing  principally  to  his  pleasing  personality  and  to  his  grasp  of  the  clothing 
business. 

B\  his  marriage  to  Signe  Vinje,  a  native  of  Kongsvinger,  Norway, 
Olaf  J.  Schei  has  four  children,  Helen  T.,  Russell  J.,  Vernon  O.  and  Har- 
old W. 

Mr.  Schei  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  Norway,  the  Modern  Woodmen 
of  America  and  the  Benevolent  and   Protective  Order  of   I  Iks 


ALBERT  LARSON. 


Kuril  in  Sweden  on   March  4.    1853,   Allien   Larson,  a  successful   mer- 
chant of  Clitherall,  Otter  Tail  county,   Minnesota,  1-  the  son  of   Lars  and 

Anna  i  Erickson)  Asleson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden.  They  were 
married  in  their  native  land  and  immigrated  to  Filmore  county.  Minnesota, 
in  [868  In  [872  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lars  Asleson  moved  to  Leaf  Mountain 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  took  a  homestead  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acre-.     Subsequently,  they  moved  to  clitherall.   where  Lars 

Asleson  -pent  his  last  year-.  He  died  in  [903  at  the  age  of  eighty-four 
years.     His  wifi  iO]   at  the  age  of  seventy-three      They  were  the 

parent-  of  eleven  children.  Betsey,  Albert,  Jennie  John,  Maria,  Anne,  (.'ani- 
line, Matilda.  Lewis,  \inelia  and  Ellen.  Of  these  children.  Anne.  Matilda, 
Lewis,    \inelia  and  Ellen  arc  deceased. 

Albert  Larson  was  reared  on  a  farm  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools  of  Leaf  Mountain  township.  When  Mr.  Larson 
enough,  he  began  working  on  his  father's  farm.  He  later  pur- 
chased a  farm  in  Leaf  Mountain  township  from  Charles  J.  Wright.  He 
added  to  this  farm  until  he  owned  three  hundred  and  fort)  acres  of  land. 
situated  in  sections  15  and  [6.  Mr.  Larson  now  has  one  hundred  and  eighty 
acre-  of  that  farm.  In  August,  hioN.  Mr.  Larson  moved  to  Clitherall  and 
purchased  the  -tore  which  he  now  occupies.  He  is  engaged  in  the  general 
mercantile  business  and  also  owns  stock  in  the  Clitherall  drain  Associa- 
tion, and  in  the  Clitherall  Co-operative  Creamery  Company. 

On  December  11,  [880,    Albert  Larson  was  married  to  Lena  II. 
who  was  born,  in   Norway  on    August    15.    [864,  and  who  is  the  daughter 
of  Halvor  and  Ragena  1  Martinson)   Halverson,  both  of  whom  were  natives 
of    Norway.      Mr.    Larson's    father   remained   in    Norway,   but    her   mother 
came  to  Goodhue  county,   Minnesota,  and  after  living  for  a   few    years  in 


OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA.  SO, 

Faribault  and  Red  Wing-  came  to  Otter. Tail  county  in  1873  and  settled  in 
Leaf  Mountain  township,  where  she  died  on  February  4.  iqoj,  at  the  age 
of  eighty-five.  Her  husband  had  died  many  years  previously  in  Norway. 
They  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children,  of  whom  seven  are  living- 
Rebecca,  Alary,  Robert.  John,  (lie.  Sever  and  Lena. 

Mr,  and  Mrs.  Albert  Larson  have  thirteen  children,  Lloyd  Arthur, 
John  Alfred,  Ole  Rudolph,  Rachel  Amanda,  Alma  Augusta,  Henry  Marvin, 
Mabel  Josephine,  Selma  Matilda,  Ida  Amelia.  Clifford  Clarence,  Edna  Grace, 
Gladys  Lillian  and  Lena  Lenora,  all  of  whom  are  living. 

Although  Air.  Larson  is  independent  in  politics,  he  has  always  been 
active  in  local  affairs.  He  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  council  since  he 
came  to  Clitherall  and  also  as  clerk  of  the  village.  Mr.  and  Airs.  Albert 
Larson  and  family  are  members  of  the  United  Lutheran  church. 


JOHN  H.  LOKEN. 


One  of  the  successful  merchants  of  Clitherall,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  is  John  H.  Loken,  who  is  a  native  of  Norway,  where  he  was 
born  on  July  30,   1S68. 

John  H.  Loken  is  the  son  of  Hagen  J.  and  Gura  (Helseth)  Loken, 
both  of  whom  were  born  in  Norway.  Air.  Loken's  father  was  born  on  Octo- 
ber 13,  1833,  and  bis  mother  on  June  6,  1830.  After  their  marriage  in 
Norway,  they  immigrated  to  America  and  settled  in  Wisconsin  in  1870.  , 
On  July  to,  1871,  they  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  taking  a  homestead 
of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  8,  of  Nidaros  township.  Hagen 
J.  Loken  improved  bis  farm  in  many  ways.  He  erected  good  buildings 
on  the  farm  and  lived  upon  this  old  homestead  until  March  16,  1909.  His 
wife  died  on  December  5.  1905.  They  were  members  of  the  L'nited 
Lutheran  church.  They  had  a  family  of  five  children,  of  whom  Gunder, 
the  youngest,  died  in  infancy.  The  living  children  are  Johanna,  John  H., 
Josephine  and  Jens. 

John  H.  Loken  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  educated  in  the 
public  schools  of  Nidaros  township.  For  a  number  of  years  he  was  engaged 
in  farming.  When  be  was  twenty-one  years  old,  in  1880.  Mr.  Loken  pur- 
chased his  Father's  farm,  [n  [909  he  moved  to  Clitherall  and  engaged  in 
the  hardware  and  furniture  business.  Since  thai  time  he  has  built  up  a 
large  and  prosperous  patronage  in  Clitherall  and  vicinity.  Mr.  Loken  owns 
his  own  place  of  business  as  well  as  his  residence  in  Clitherall.  He  owns 
stock  in  the  Clitherall  drain  Association  and  also  in  the  Co-operative 
Creamerv  Association  and  the  banners'  Elevator  Company  at  Yining.  Min- 
nesota. 

In    [803   John    11.    Loken    was   married   to   Johanna    Johnson,    who    was 


<)0  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

born  in  Sweden.  April  21,  [873,  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Andrew  and 
Frederika  Johnson.  They  came  from  Sweden  to  America  in  1889  and 
settled  in  Leaf  .Mountain  township,  where  Mrs.  Loken's  father  died  in 
1904,  at  the  age  of  about  seventy-three  years.  I  lis  widow  is  still  living  and 
1-  now  seventy-eight  years  old. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  H.  Loken  have  four  children:  Mabel,  born  on 
July  [3,  [897,  who  was  educated  at  the  Park  Region  Luther  College,  of 
Fergus  Falls;  Henry,  October  31,  1000:  Gordon,  April  8,  1005:  and  Law- 
rence. August  28,   1007. 

Mr.  Loken  ha-  served  as  president  of  the  village  of  Chtherall  for  two 
years  and  is  now  a  member  of  the  Clitherall  council.  lie  was  clerk  of  the 
school  board  of  district  No.  53,  for  twelve  years  ami  served  as  supervisor 
of  the  township  for  three  years.  Altogether.  John  H.  Loken  is  one  of  the 
most  prominent  citizens  of  Clitherall  township  and  one  of  its  must  highly 
respected  citi/ens  and  business  men. 


WDUl'.M    GUSTAFSON. 


Horn  in  Sweden  on  January  X.  1860,  Andrew  Gustafson,  a  well-known 
lumber  dealer  of  Clitherall,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  is  the  son  of 
Gustav  Person  and  Louisa  (Ryberg)  Gustafson,  both  of  whom  were  horn 
in  Sweden  in  1832.  They  were  married  in  Sweden  and  there  Mr.  Gustaf- 
son's  father  died  in  iqii.  His  mother  is  still  living  in  her  native  land  and 
is  now  eighty-three  years  old.  The  seven  children  horn  to  Gustav  Person 
Gustafson  and  wife  are:  Carl,  Andrew,  Aunett,  Peter,  Louisa.  Caroline 
and  Anne,  all  of  whom  are  living.  Of  these  children.  Louisa  is  the  wife  of 
Peter  Ericksen,  of  Garfield,  Douglas  county,  Minnesota.  With  the  excep- 
tion of  Andrew  and  Louisa,  the  remainder  of  the  family  still  live  in  Sweden. 
\ndrew  Gustafson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
land,  lie  came  to  America  in  [882  and  settled  in  Douglas  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  lived  until  1902,  when  he  settled  .11  Clitherall.  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  and  engaged  in  the  lumber  business.  Here  Mr.  Gustaf- 
son has  built  up  a  most  prosperous  and  growing  business  in  lumber.  Prior 
in  coming  to  Clitherall,  he  was  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  at  Garfield, 
:ars.  Mr.  Gustafson  is  a  stockholder  in  the 
tnd  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Chtherall  Co- 
He  is  now  president  of  the  Clitherall  council 
l'  the  seho.il  board  since  he  came  to  Clitherall, 
four  wars.  IK-  was  also  a  member  of  the 
1  he  resided  in  Douglas  county. 
on  was  married  to  Louisa  Angus,  who  was 
is  the  daughter  of   Robert  and   Elsie  Angus. 


in   1 )'  mglas  count}' 

for  ten 

Garfield   <  Ireamery 

Compam 

operative  <  Teamen 

(  ompam 

and  has  served  ;is  i 

1  member 

with  the  exceptii  m 

of  the  la 

school  board  of  G; 

trfield,  wli 

In    [892    \ndt 

ew   Gusta 

horn  in    Minnesota 

.   and    wh( 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  QI 

-Mrs.  Gustafson's  father  is  deceased,  but  her  mother  is  living  in  Garfield, 
Minnesota.  Mr.  and  Airs.  Gu'stafson  have  four  children.  William  S.,  Amy 
C,  Roger  A.  and  Anna  C. 

Air.  and  Air.-..  Andrew  Gustafson  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
church  at  Clitherall.  They  are  prominent,  not  only  in  religious  work,  but 
take  an  active  interest  in  all  public  matters. 


ADS  IT  C.  HATCH. 


One  of  the  most  prominent  business  men  and  citizens  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  Alinnesota,  and,  in  point  of  years,  the  oldest  merchant  in  Battle 
Lake,  Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  where  he  was 
born  on  July  12,  1855. 

Adsit  C.  Hatch  is  the  son  of  Lorenzo  and  Clara  E.  ( Adsit  J  Hatch, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  New  York  state,  the  former  having  been 
born  on  March  17,  1822,  and  the  latter  on  September  29,  1821.  Mr.  Hatch's 
paternal  grandparents  were  Wells  and  Alary  (Rexford)  Hatch,  who  were 
natives  of  Connecticut  and  New  York  state,  respectively.  They  immi- 
grated from  New  York  state  to  Virginia,  where  they  both  died.  Mr.  Hatch's 
grandfather  was  killed  during  the  Civil  War.  He  was  a  soldier  in  the  First 
Virginia  Cavalry.  His  death  occurred  in  1862,  when  he  was  seventy-four 
years  old.  Timothy  Hatch,  who  was  Adsit  C.  Hatch's  great-grand- 
father, was  the  son  of  Jethro  Hatch,  a  major  in  the  Revolutionary  War. 
Adsit  C.  Hatch  is  in  possession  of  a  sword  which  Jethro  Hatch  carried 
during  the  Revolutionary  War.  Majnr  Jethro  Hatch  participated  in  the 
battle  of  Ticonderoga.  Timothy  Hatch,  the  son  of  Jethro  Hatch,  enlisted 
in  the  Revolutionary  army  at  the  age  of  seventeen  and  took  part  in  the 
battle  of  Saratoga.  He  was  a  pensioner  at  the  time  of  his  death  in  i<Sst> 
at  the  age  of  ninety-six   years.      The   Hatch    family    is   of    English   descent. 

Mr.  Hatch's  maternal  grandparents  were  Stephen  and  Elizabeth  1  I  Deri 
Adsit,  natives  of  Ww  York  state.  They  immigrated  to  Dane  county,  Wis- 
consin, and  there  they  both  died. 

Mr.  Hatch's  father  moved  to  Virginia  when  he  was  eighteen  years  old. 
For  several  years  he  was  superintendent  of  public  works  in  the  Districl  of 
Columbia.  In  [852  his  parents  located  in  Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  and 
there  took  up  a  farm.  Lorenzo  Hatch  died  in  Dane  county  in  lune,  [911. 
His  wile  had  died  in  [861.  They  had  fo„r  children,  Susan,  Man.  Clara 
ami  \dsit.  Lorenzo  I  latch  was  a  Democrat  111  politics,  a  member  of  the 
Legislature  and  deputy  provosl  marshal  (hiring  the  (  ivil  War.  lie  was  a 
member  of  the  Presbyterian  church. 

\dsit  ( '.  Hatch  was  reared  in  Dane  county.  Wisconsin,  on  a  farm  and 
educated    in    the    public    schools.       He    completed     his     education     at      Albion 


Q2  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

Academy,  the  Wisconsin  Stale  University  and  was  graduated  from  a  busi- 
ness college  at  Madison.  Until  he  was  twenty-one  years  old.  Mr.  Hatch 
lived  on  the  farm.  Shortly  after  his  twenty-first  birthday  he  went  to  Texas 
where  he  lived  for  two  years.  He  then  returned  to  Wisconsin  and  lived 
for  two  vears  and  then  established  himself  in  business  at  Evansville.  .Mr. 
Hatch  came  to  Battle  Lake  in  1881  and  has  been  continuously  in  business 
since  that  time.  He  has  the  longest  business  career  in  this  town  of  any 
man  new  in  business.  Mr.  Hatch  owns  the  grain  elevator  at  Battle  Lake, 
farm  lands  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  other  important  industrial  and  financial 
interests. 

On  March  9,  1890,  Adsit  C.  Hatch  was  married  to  Louisa  Sahol,  of 
Battle  Lake.  Minnesota.  To  them  have  been  born  eleven  children,  all  of 
whom  are  living,  namely:  Susie.  Agnes,  Charles,  llattie.  Edith,  Carrie,  Alice. 
Elizabeth.  Dorothy,  Hester  and  Lorenzo. 

Few  men  have  taken  a  more  active  interest  in  the  work  of  the  Minne- 
sota Anti-saloon  League  than  Adsit  C.  Hatch.  He  is  an  implacable  foe  of 
the  liquor  traffic  and  an  ardent  believer  and  advocate  of  temperance.  Mr. 
Hatch  is  independent  in  politics  and  has  never  aspired  to  office.  The 
Hatch  family  are  all  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  take  an  active 
interest  in  religious  affairs. 


MARTIN   ROSYOLD. 


Martin  Rosvold.  who  is  a  well-known  and  highly-respected  farmer  oi 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  who  has  made  a  success  of  his  chosen 
vocation,  was  born  at  Trondhjem,  Norway,  March  5,  1858,  and  is  tin  son  of 
Peter  and  Annie  (Volen")  Rosvold. 

Mr.  Rosvold's  parents  were  also  born  at  Trondhjem  and  grew  up  there 
and  were  married.  The  father  came  to  America  in  r.867,  leaving  his  family 
in  Norway.  He  lived  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  for  three  years  and. 
in  [869,  his  wife  and  five  of  the  six  children  came  to  join  him.  In  1870 
the  whole  family  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  settled  in  Tordenskjcld 
township  near  the  Lutheran  church,  where  they  homesteaded  one  hundred 
and  sixtv  acres  of  land.  Later,  however,  they  -old  this  farm  and  purchased 
.me  hundred  and  sixt)  acres  in  Dane  Prairie  township.  This  land  was 
mainly  covered  with  timber.  Mr.  Rosvold  cleared  the  land  and.  from  year 
to  year,  erected  substantial  outbuildings,  including  a  house,  barn  and  granary. 
\bout  fifteen  years  ago,  he  retired  to  a  small  forty  acre  tract  of  land  in 
rorden  kjold  town-hip  and  died  there  two  years  later.  Ills  wife  had  .lied 
in  [896.  The)  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  reared  a  family 
1  children,  seven  dying  early  in  life.  The  names  of  the  children  in 
fhe   order  of   their  birth    were:    Martin,    the   subjed    of   this   sketch:    Andor. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  93 

who  lives  in  Portland,  Oregon ;  Karen,  who  is  the  widow  of  Sam  Kloostad 
and  lives  in  Duluth,  Minnesota;  Anna,  who  lives  with  her  brother,  Martin; 
Andreas,  who  is  a  farmer  in  North  Dakota;  Olaf,  who  made  his  home  prin- 
cipally with  his  brother,  Martin,  died  in  Otter  Tail  county;  Ole,  who  died 
at  the  age  of  three  years;  the  eighth  child  died  in  infancy;  Anna  Margaret, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  twelve  years ;  John,  who  died  in  childhood ;  and  two 
who  died  early  in  life. 

Martin  Rosvold  received  a  meager  educational  training  in  district  No. 
43,  of  Dane  Prairie  township,  and  was  reared  on  the  farm.  When  he  was 
twenty-four  years  old.  he  moved  to  Port  Ransom,  North  Dakota,  where  he 
took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  one  acres  of  land  and  pre-empted 
another  one  hundred  and  sixty.  He  cultivated  practically  all  of  this  land, 
except  titty  acres  which  were  devoted  to  pasture,  and  engaged  in  general 
farming  until  1900,  when  he  returned  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  purchased 
his  father's  farm,  where  he  has  lived  ever  since.  Mr.  Rosvold  has  erected 
new  buildings,  including  a  house,  barn,  granary  and  garage.  He  is  engaged 
in  diversified  farming. 

When  the  Rosvold  family  came  to  America,  they  spent  from  seven  to 
nine  weeks  on  the  sailing  ship,  transportation  facilities  being  very  poor  at 
that  time.  The}-  were  compelled  to  change  many  times  from  the  cars  to 
a  ship  and  hack  again  to  the  cars  on  their  way  from  Quebec  to  Minnesota 
and  it  was  a  long,  hard  trip.  On  moving  from  Goodhue  county,  Mr.  Ros- 
vold  and  his  father's  family  spent  twenty-two  days  in  all  on  the  trip.  Mr. 
Rosvold's  parents  and  the  six  children  rode  in  a  covered  wagon.  The  roads 
were  terrible  and  it  rained  most  of  the  time.  The  cattle  were  driven  through 
and  some  member  of  the  family  was  compelled  to  drive  them.  On  arriving 
in  Otter  Tail  county,  the  family  spent  some  time  in  a  mere  shack  with 
straw  thatch  for  shelter.  After  breaking  three  acres  of  the  land,  the  family 
had  luit  two  dollars.  Leaving  one  dollar  with  his  wife,  Peter  Rosvold 
started  for  Goodhue  county  with  an  ox  team,  where  he  knew  he  could  obtain 
work,  there  being  no  work  in  this  vicinity.  The  nearesl  postoffice  at  that 
time  was  Clitherall.  Peter  Rosvold  started  for  Goodhue  county  in  Novem- 
ber and,  after  his  return,  built  a  small  log  house.  The  next  year  he  began 
to  clear  the  land.  During  this  period,  he  had  hut  one  cow  and  the  family 
was  often  compelled  to  live  on  dry  bread  and  black  prairie  tea.  Peter  Ros- 
vold, however,  lived  to  see  better  days  and  his  old  age  was  spent  in  comfort. 
I  [e  died  at  the  age  of  seventy-five. 

Martin  Rosvold  was  married  on  July  28,  1885.  to  (  Hena  Eggen,  a  native 
of  Norway,  who  was  also  horn  near  Trondhjem  and  who  is  the  daughter 
of  Olaf  Eggen.  The  Eggen  family  came  to  America  anil  settled  in  Dakota. 
Mrs.   Rosvold's  mother  died   in    Fargo  and   her    father  afterward    settled   in 


94  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Ransom  county.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  .Martin  Rosvold  have  been  the  parents  of 
fen  children:  Karen,  who  died  early  in  life;  Paul  Oscar,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  two  years;  Astrid,  who  married  Albert  Hoversten,  of  Waseca,  Min- 
nesota, both  of  whom  were  educated  in  the  University  of  Minnesota;  Alfred, 
who  helps  on  the  home  farm,  is  a  graduate  of  the  agricultural  department 
of  the  University  of  Minnesota;  Nora,  who  was  educated  in  the  Fergus 
Falls  high  school,  teaches  in  the  public  schools  and  lives  at  home;  Annie, 
who  is  a  student  in  the  University  of  Minnesota;  Olaf,  who  lives  at  home; 
Martha  Olena,  who  died  in  infancy;  .Agnes  and  Margaret,  both  of  whom  live 
at  home. 

Mr.  Rosvold  has  always  been  independent  in  politics.  He  supports 
measures  and  men  rather  than  parties  and  party  emblems.  He  served  many 
years  as  a  school  director  and  has  always  been  keenly  interested  in  educa- 
tion, as  the  exceptional  opportunities  which  he  has  given  to  his  children  so 
well  prove.  The  Rosvold  family  are  members  of  the  Swan  Lake  Lutheran 
church. 


EDWARD  L.  AASNES. 

Born  on  June  10.  1835,  m  Norway,  Edward  L.  Aasnes,  a  prosperous 
farmer  of  Dane  Prairie  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  a  son 
of  Lars  and  Ellen  Knutson. 

Mr.  Aasnes's  parents  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Norway.  His  father 
was  a  glass-blower  by  trade,  and  was  employed  in  a  glass  factory  in  his 
native  land.  Mr.  Aasnes  is  one  of  nine  children  born  to  his  parents: 
Andrew,  the  eldest,  was  also  a  glass-blower  by  trade,  and  died  in  Norway; 
<  )le,  who  was  a  turner  by  trade,  also  died  in  Norway;  Cornelius,  who  was  a 
retired  farmer,  and  who  came  to  St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Min- 
nesota, in  1867.  died  111  June,  1915,  at  Fergus  Falls;  Lawrence,  living  111 
Norway;  Rasmina  lives  in  Norway;  Anna,  living  in  Norway  with  her  hus- 
band; AiUlf.  living  in  North  Dakota;  John,  who  died  at  the  age  of  four 
years;  Edward  I...  of  Dane  Prairie  township. 

Edward  L.  Aasnes  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
land,  and  worked  at  various  occupations  until  r866,  when  he  emigrated  to 
,-a.  \tter  living  in  the  latter  state  for  one  year, 
iy,  Minnesota,  and  settled  in  St.  Olaf  township 
with  whom  he  lived  for  three  years.  In  1870 
ty-eighl  acres  of  land  in  Dane  Prairie  township. 
At  ibis  time  the  Indians  still  roamed  over  the 
around  to  this  section  to  hunt.  However,  they 
truly  pioneer  conditions  Mr.  Aasnes  continued 
nd   and   erected   substantial   buildings    from   time 


America, 

settling  first  111   h.< 

he  came 

to  (  liter  Tail  com 

with  his 

brother.  Cornelius, 

Mr.  Aasi 

les  hi  »mesteaded  sb 

a u<l  here 

built  a  log  hou-e. 

prairies  ; 

md  came   fi  ir  miles 

were  ver 

y    friendly.      Undei 

i"  impro 

\e   and    clear   his    ]; 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  95 

to  time.  He  prospered  as  a  fanner  and  has  been  able  to  add  forty  acres 
more  to  his  original  holdings,  and  now  owns  one  hundred  and  eighty  acres. 

In  [880  Edward  L.  Aasnes  was  married  to  Aletta  Olson,  a  native  of 
Norway,  born  in  1845,  at  ^I|>ss.  Mrs.  Aasnes  is  a  daughter  of  Ole  and 
.Martha  (  Larson  1  Olson,  both  of  whom  died  in  Norway.  Mrs.  Aasnes  came 
to  America  in  1S71,  and  has  a  brother,  Otto,  and  sister  living  in  Chicago. 
Her  sister,  Lena,  is  the  wife  of  Jens  Olson. 

Edward  L.  Aasnes  and  wife  are  the  parents  of  two  children,  Oscar, 
who  lives  at  home  and  operates  the  home  farm,  and  Emma  Matilda,  who 
died  September  12,  1886,  at  the  age  of  six  months. 

Upon  coming  to  America  Mr.  Aasnes  identified  himself  with  the  Repub- 
lican party,  and  served  for  thirty  years  as  a  supervisor  in  Dane  Prairie 
township.  Mr.  Aasnes  and  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  in 
which  they  have  always  taken  an  active  interest. 


OLE  CHRISTIAN  NELSON. 

Prominent  in  the  business  life  of  P.attle  Lake,  Minnesota,  is  Ole  Chris- 
tian Nelson,  who  has  been  continuously  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business 
at  Battle  Lake  since  the  early  eighties  and  who  is  now  doing  business  in 
Battle  Lake  under  the  firm  name  of  O.  (  '.  Nelson  &  Company. 

Born  on  February  17,  [857,  in  Norway,  Ole  Christian  Nelson  is  the 
son  of  Nels  and  Helena  (Johnson)  Nelson,  also  natives  of  Norway,  who 
were  born  in  [827  and  [825,  respectively.  Mr.  Nelson's  father  was  a 
farmer  by  occupation,  and  died  in  1899.  On  September  15,  1901,  Mrs. 
Helena  Nelson  came  to  Battle  Lake.  Minnesota,  and  died  here  on  October 
16,  1901.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  of  whom  two,  both  named 
Martenns.  are  deceased.  The  living  children  are,  Ole  Christian,  Josephena 
and  Hans. 

Ole  Christian  Nelson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway 
and  was  confirmed  in  the  Lutheran  church  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years.  He 
worked  in  the  lumber-mills  and  on  the  railroads  of  Norway  until  the  spring 
of  t88o,  when  he  came  to  America  and  settled  at  Stillwater,  in  Washington 
county,  Minnesota,  where  he  was  employed  by  Isaac  Staples  until  [881, 
when  he  moved  to  Fargo,  North  Dakota.  On  July  o.  1 SN 1 ,  Mr.  Nelson 
moved  to  Battle  Lake,  Minnesota,  and  for  a  time,  stopped  with  Han-  Gil- 
bertson.  He  got  employment  here  on  the  railroad  and  worked  until  Octo- 
ber 8,  [88l,  when  he  returned  to  Washington  county,  Minnesota,  to  work 
for  Mr.  Staples.  In  March.  iKK_>.  Air.  Nelson  came  hack  to  Battle  I  .ako 
ami  has  resided  here  ever  since.  In  June,  [882,  he  bought  a  one-half  inter- 
est in  the  Rustof  &  Dol  meat  market,  and  two  years  later,  purchased  the 
other  one-half  interest   and   operated    the  business    for   a   period   of   twelve 


96  >'l|i:;    TAIL    iniNTV.     MINNESOTA. 

years.  In  the  meantime  he  had  erected  several  stores.  He  first  embarked 
in  the  grocery  business  and  then  branched  out  in  the  clothing  business  and 
finally  in  the  general  mercantile  business.  His  store  was  burned  in  1906 
and  rebuilt  in  1907.  He  has  one  store,  twenty-five  by  eighty  feet,  and  just 
north  of  that  has  erected  another  building,  forty  by  ninety  feet.  In  addi- 
tion to  his  private  business  interests.  Mr.  Nelson  owns  stock  in  the  flour- 
mill  and  is  one  of  the  directors  of  the  company. 

<  in  February  26,  1895,  Ole  C.  Nelson  was  married  to  Matilda  Nickel- 
son,  whu  was  born  at  Baldwin,  St.  Croix  county,  Wisconsin,  January  31. 
1876,  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  O.  M.  and  Serine  (Olsdatter)  Nickelson, 
natives  of  Norway,  where  they  were  born  on  September  30,  1844,  and  1845, 
respectively.  Mrs.  Nelson's  parents  moved  to  Wisconsin  during  the  sixties, 
but  later  returned  to  Norway.  They  immigrated  to  Battle  Creek.  Wiscon- 
sin, in  1885,  and  settled  on  a  farm.  In  iqi  i  they  sold  their  farm  and  moved 
to  Battle  Lake,  where  Mrs.  Nelson's  mother  died  on  October  4.  1913.  Mrs. 
Nelson  was  the  eldest  in  a  family  of  seven  children,  the  others  being,  Gusta, 
Margaret,  Eliza,  Oscar,  Josephine  and  Mabel.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ole  Christian 
Nelson  have  been  the  parents  .if  six  children.  Orville.  Helmer  S..  Cameron 
(deceased),  Helen.  Robert  and  Carl. 

Mr.  Nelson  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  Battle  Lake  town  council. 
He  and  his  wife  and  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  take 
an  active  interest  in  religious  affairs. 


REV.  DITLEF  G.  RISTAD. 

Rev.  Ditlef  <  r.  Ristad,  president  of  Park  Region  Luther  College  at 
Fergus  Falls,  has  won  for  himself  a  conspicuous  position  in  the  educational 
life  uf  Otter  Tail  county  and  of  the  -tate  of  Minnesota.  Educated  in  the 
schools  nf  his  native  land  and  in  the  best  colleges  and  universities  of  this 
country,  he  i-  a  man  of  striking  personality  and  b\  reason  of  In-  tolerant 
political,  social  and  religious  views  enjoys  the  confidence  of  a  large  circle  of 
friends  in  this  section  of  Minnesota,  lie  is  a  rr 
of  the  people,  in  the  broadest  sense  of  the  word  a 
city  improvement  committee  of  Fergus  Falls,  has 
beautification  of  that  splendid  city. 

Born  in  the  province  of  Namdalen,  Norway,  the  Rev.  Ditlef  G,  Ristad 
is  the  -"ii  of  George  ami  Johanna  1  Bergitte)  Ristad,  the  former  of  whom, 
a  farmer  by  occupation,  also  had  charge  of  die  government  forests,  lie 
died  in  hi-  native  land  in  [904.  lli-  beloved  wife,  mother  of  the  subject  of 
this  sketch,  i-  -till  living.  The  Ristad  family  is  a  historic  one  in  Norway 
mil  has  an  unbroken  history  of  four  hundred  year-  in  one  locality.  \  part 
"i    the  original   house  of  1",^-.    which   ha-  been   clapbdarded   two  or  three 


iter 

i" 

and 

ail   e< 

lucati  >r 

as 

the 

pres 

idem 

of 

the 

d  1 

unci 

1  to 

do    w 

ith 

the 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  97 

timeSj  and  where  Ditlef  G.  Ristad  was  born,  is  still  standing  and  is  now  four 
hundred  years  old.  The  first  boards  put  on  over  the  logs  were  fastened  by 
means  of  wooden  pegs,  this  being  long  before  nails  were  in  use.  The  last 
boarding  was  in  1812,  but  these  boards  were  put  on  with  nails. 

Ditlef  G.  Ristad  attended  the  public  schools  of  Norway  and  subse- 
quently took  a  three-years  course  at  the  State  Normal  School,  after  which 
he  taught  in  the  high  school  for  a  time  and  served  as  a  private  tutor  for 
three  years.  He  served  three  years  in  the  army  and  on  September  1,  1887, 
left  his  native  land  for  America.  Upon  landing  he  immediately  proceeded 
to  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  and  for  some  time  turned  his  hands  to  anything  he 
could  find  to  do.  He  worked  in  the  streets  and  in  the  stone  quarries  and 
was  planning  to  go  to  Xew  Zealand,  where  he  had  relatives  who  were  inter- 
ested in  mining  projects.  About  that  time  he  received  a  letter  from  a  cousin 
of  his  mother's,  who  had  heard  of  his  being  in  America.  This  cousin  gave 
him  a  position  in  his  general  store  at  Mindora,  Wisconsin,  where  he  remained 
until  1889,  in  the  fall  of  which  year  he  entered  the  Lutheran  Theological 
Seminary  at  St.  Paul,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  summer  of  1892. 
He  then  accepted  a  call  from  the  church  at  Koshkonong,  Dane  county,  Wis- 
consin (a  church  that  was  dedicated  in  1844  and  had  the  first  ordained  pastor 
from  Norway),  where  he  served  as  pastor  until  1900,  in  the  meantime 
( 1896-97)  taking  a  post-graduate  course  in  the  University  of  Chicago. 
During  the  year  1894  and  again  in  1904  the  Rev.  Mr.  Ristad  traveled  exten- 
sively in  Europe.  In  1900  he  was  elected  principal  of  the  Albion  Academy 
at  Albion,  Wisconsin,  and  remained  there  until  1906,  when  he  accepted  a 
call  from  the  Park  Region  Luther  College  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  and 
has  served  continuously  as  president  ever  since.  He  is  an  efficient  instructor 
and  a  man  of  splendid  executive  attainment,  who  by  his  own  personal  force 
has  been  instrumental  in  building  up  the  college  of  which  he  is  the  honored 
president. 

By  Ins  marriage  to  Sara  Moltzan  Johnson,  a  native  of  Milwaukee.  Wis- 
consin, Rev.  Mr.  Ristad  has  had  two  sons.  George  Rolf  and  Robert  Nicholas. 

The  Rev.  Ditlef  G.  Ristad  is  what  might  be  called  a  "number  one" 
man  and  citizen,  one  who  has  worthily  discharged  his  duties  in  all  the  rela- 
tions of  life  and  who  has  meritoriousl)  attained  a  position  of  honor  and 
trust  in  the  community  of  his  residence.  For  years  he  has  been  a  valued 
contributor  to  the  leading  Norwegian  newspapers  and  magazines,  both  in 
this  country  and  in  Norway  and  has  displayed  a  keen  interest  in  the 
"P.ygdelag"  (provincial  societies)  movement.  Mr.  Ristad  occupies  a  very 
high  position  in  the  councils  of  his  communion  in  this  country  and  served  as 
a  member  of  the  committee  which  prepared  the  "Lutheran  Hymnary,"  the 
(?b) 


C)8  OTTER     I  Ml      COl    XIV,    MINNESOTA. 

official  hymn-book  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  in  America,  and  was 
one  of  the  editors  of  the  "Lutheran  Hymnary,  Jr.,"  a  bilingual  hymn-book 
for  young  people.  He  also  has  translated  a  number  of  the  best  English 
hymns  into  the  Norwegian  tongue  and  has  translated  the  standard  Nor- 
wegian hymns  into  English. 

JENS   P.  JENSEN. 

Jens  P.  Jensen,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Dane  Prairie  township,  is  a 
native  of  Tordenskjold  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he 
was  born  on  March  2,  1871.  Mr.  Jensen  is  the  son  of  Peter  and  .Maren 
Christine  (Jensen)  Jensen,  who  were  born  in  Denmark  and  who  came  to 
America  before  their  marriage,  the  father  about  1867  and  the  mother  about 
two  years  later. 

Peter  Jensen  was  eighteen  weeks  on  the  water  in  coming  to  America. 
Cholera  broke  out  on  the  ship  in  which  he  made  the  voyage  to  America  and 
about  one-half  of  the  people  on  the  ship  died  and  were  buried  at  sea.  The 
ship  was  quarantined  in  the  New  York  harbor  for  many  months  before  the 
survivors  were  permitted  to  land.  After  coming  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Peter 
Jensen  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  and  was  then  mar- 
ried to  Christine  Jensen  and  settled  on  the  farm,  living  there  until  ion;. 
when  he  sold  out  and  moved  to  Los  Angeles,  California,  which  has  been  his 
home  since,  with  the  exception  of  three  years  spent  on  a  farm  near  Los 
Angeles.  Peter  Jensen  was  compelled  to  clear  his  land  and  cut  off  the  tim- 
ber, before  he  could  raise  a  crop  on  his  homestead  farm  in  this  county. 

The  first  white  men  who  came  to  this  country  through  Tordenskjold 
were  Peter  Jensen,  his  brother,  Christopher,  Jens  and  Hans  Jacobson.  Peter 
Jensen  built  a  house  immediately  after  coming  to  this  county  and  a  part 
of  this  house  is  still  standing.  He  also  built  a  log  barn,  but  in  later  years 
before  leaving  the  county  erected  a  frame  barn.  He  was  a  school  director 
for  many  years  and  also  held  ether  important  township  offices,  lie  was  a 
Democrat  in  politics  and  one  of  the  organizers  >>i  the  Sverdrup  Mutual  Fire 
Insurance  Company.  Roth  he  and  his  wife  are  devout  members  of  the 
Lutheran  church  and  he  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Tordenskjold  town- 
ship church.  They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children,  of  whom  Anna  mar- 
ried John  M.  Clark  and  lives  in  Los  Angeles,  California;  Jens  P.  is  tin- 
subject  of  this  sketch;  Hans  is  a  farmer  of  Dane  Prairie  township;  Minm 
is  the  general  manager  of  the  J.  I.  Case  Threshing  Machine  Company  of 
Minneapolis,  Minnesota;  Andrew  is  a  farmer  in  Orphena,  Idaho;  Mary. 
who  married  Gust  Sunday,  resides  at  Ocean  Beach,  California:  Alexander 
is  a   farmer  in  California:   Andrea,  who  was  the  twin  brother  of  Andrew, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  99 

died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years  in  1892;  and  George  Franklin  died  at  the 
age  of  nine  months. 

Jens  P.  Jensen  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Tordenskjold 
township  and  for  many  years  attended  school  district  No.  95.  He  was 
reared  on  the  farm,  and  having  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  followed  this 
trade  for  some  years,  working  in  both  the  East  and  the  West.  After  his 
marriage  in  1906,  Mr.  Jensen  engaged  in  farming.  Previously  he  had  pur- 
chased eighty  acres  of  land  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  and  after  his  marriage 
settled  on  this  farm.  Shortly  afterward  he  erected  a  modern  house  and  barn 
and  other  substantial  outbuildings.  Mr.  Jensen  is  interested  in  the  local 
creamery  and  in  the  telephone  company. 

On  May  26,  1906,  Jens  P.  Jensen  was  married  to  Hannah  Christiansen, 
a  native  of  Dane  Prairie  township  and  the  daughter  of  Peter  and  Mary 
Christiansen,  who  were  old  settlers  from  Denmark.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jens  P. 
Jensen  have  four  children,  Pearl  Marie,  George  Afton,  Kermit  James  and 
Harriet  Elizabeth  Marian. 

Although  a  Socialist  in  politics,  Mr.  Jensen  has  never  aspired  to  office. 
He  is  known  in  this  township  as  a  successful  farmer  and  an  enterprising 
citizen. 


HANS  P.  TENSEN. 


Born  on  his  father's  farm  in  Tordenskjold  township,  Otter  Tail  county. 
September  26,  1872,  Hans  P.  Jensen  was  educated  in  district  No.  95,  of 
Tordenskjold  township.  Mr.  Jensen  first  attended  school  in  a  store  build- 
ing and  later  in  a  small  log  school  house.  He  was  reared  on  the  home  farm, 
and  when  he  had  grown  to  young  manhood  removed  to  Wilkin  county, 
where,  for  a  number  of  years,  he  managed  a  farm  near  Foxhome  which 
was  owned  by  his  father. 

After  remaining  near  Foxhome  from  1892  until  1900,  Mr.  Jensen 
returned  to  Dane  Prairie  township,  settling  with  his  brother,  Jens,  on  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  13.  Here  he  built  a  house  and 
for  the  next  six  years  lived  as  a  bachelor.  During  the  fall  he  was  engaged 
in  threshing  and  in  the  winter  time  was  engaged  in  the  operation  of  a  saw- 
mill. 

On  April  6,  1904,  Thomas  P.  Jensen  was  married  and,  although  he  is 
still  engaged  in  threshing,  he  operates  the  farm.  Mr.  Jensen's  wife,  before 
her  marriage,  was  Anna  Christina  Tollefson,  a  native  of  Sweden  and  the 
daughter  of  Carl  A.  and  Britta  (Ash)  Tollefson,  who  are  old  settlers  in 
Otter  Tail  county.  Mrs.  Jensen's  grandfather,  Andrew  Tollefson,  home- 
steaded  land  in  Dane  Prairie  township  about  1868.  He  died  here  in  1907. 
Mrs.  Jensen's  parents  are  still  living. 


IOO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;    MINNESOTA. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hans  P.  Jensen  have  been  the  parents  of  four  children, 
Blanche,  Frances,  Henry  Arnold,  who  died  at  the  age  of  nineteen  months, 
and  Margaret  Amanda. 

Hans  P.  Jensen  has  always  been  independent  in  politics.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  For  many  years  he  has 
served  as  supervisor  of  Dane  Prairie  township.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jensen  are 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  They  are  regular  attendants  at  church 
services  and  are  liberal  supporters  of  the  church. 


OTTO  E.  SCHACHTSCHNEIDER. 

Although  a  comparatively  young  man,  Otto  E.  Schachtschneider,  who 
was  born  in  the  northern  part  of  Germany,  October  6,  1884,  has  experienced 
many  of  the  hardships  of  pioneer  life  and  knows  what  it  is  to  perform  hard 
labor. 

Mr.  Schachtschneider  is  the  son  of  Robert  and  Bertha  (Perleberg) 
Schachtschneider.  The  former  was  the  son  of  Johan  and  Fredericka 
(Schesserj  Schachtschneider,  who  was  born  in  the  northern  part  of  Ger- 
many. Johan  Schachtschneider  was  a  laborer  and  died  in  his  native  land  at 
the  age  of  forty-eight.  He  was  the  father  of  fourteen  children,  of  whom 
five  came  to  America.  The  grandmother  also  came  to  America  and  died 
at  the  home  of  Mr.  Schachtschneider's  father  in  1910.  Of  the  five  children 
who  came  to  America,  Herman  is  a  farmer  of  Dane  Prairie  township; 
August  is  a  laborer  and  lives  at  Canton,  Ohio;  Otto  is  a  farmer  and  lives 
near  Underwood,  in  Sverdruf  township;  Bertha  married  Max  Miller;  and 
Robert  is  the  father  of  Otto  E.  Schachtschneider.  The  maternal  grand- 
parents of  Otto  E.  Schachtschneider  were  August  and  Fredericka  Perle- 
berg,  who  came  to  America  from  Germany  about  1895  and,  three  years 
later,  immigrated  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota.  They  died  in  Tor- 
denskjold  township,  after  having  reared  a  family  of  twelve  children,  all  of 
whom  came  to  America. 

Mr.  Schachtschneider's  father  was  born  in  the  northern  part  of  Ger- 
many and  his  mother  in  the  same  part  of  the  same  country.  They  grew 
to  maturity  and  were  married  in  their  native  land.  Like  his  father,  Robert 
Schachtschneider  was  a  laborer  in  his  native  land.  In  1885  the  family  came 
to  America  and  settled  at  Cleveland,  Ohio.  There  he  became  a  member  of 
the  Lumberman's  Longshoremen  Association  and  was  engaged  in  loading 
boats  until  1897.  Tiring  of  city  life  and  desiring  a  better  opportunity  for 
his  children,  he  came  to  Minnesota,  settling  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  Otter 
Tail  county,  where  he  purchased  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  thirty-six  acres 
of  limber  land  in  the  southeast  quarter  of  section  23.  Although  many 
people  may  believe  that  pioneering  was  a  thing  of  the  past  in  1897.  never- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  IOI 

theless,  a  part  of  Dane  Prairie  township  was  an  unbroken  wilderness  in 
those  years.  Robert  Schachtschneider  and  his  family  experienced  all  of  the 
trials  of  pioneer  life.  They  first  built  a  small  house  which  is  a  part  of 
their  present,  though  much  enlarged,  home.  As  the  farm  was  cleared  a 
new  barn  was  erected  and  finally,  by  industry  and  co-operation  on  the  part 
of  the  whole  family,  the  farm  was  sufficiently  cleared  to  support  the  family 
and  yield  a  profit  besides.  Both  parents  are  still  living  on  the  farm.  Robert 
Schachtschneider  is  an  ardent  Republican.  He  and  his  wife  had  four  chil- 
dren, of  whom  Herman  died  in  infancy;  Otto  E.  is  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Charles  lives  on  a  part  of  the  home  place;  and  Anna  married  Charles 
Drews  and  lives  in  section  7,  of  Dane  Prairie  township. 

Otto  E.  Schachtschneider  was  educated  in  the  parochial  schools  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  and  was  still  a  mere  lad  when  his  parents  moved  to  Minne- 
sota. He  experienced  the  hardships  and  inconveniences  attendant  upon 
clearing  a  large  farm  and  became  accustomed  to  hard  work.  His  father 
growing  old  in  1908,  Mr.  Schachtschneider  began  renting  the  place  and 
has  continued  so  ever  since.  He  is  a  general  farmer  and  raises  very  fine 
crops. 

In  1910  Otto  E.  Schachtschneider  was  married  to  Bertha  Boeder,  who 
was  born  in  Dane  Prairie  township.  They  have  five  children,  Elmer,  Arnold, 
Anna,  John  and  Arthur. 

No  family  deserves  more  credit  for  what  it  has  accomplished  in  the 
face  of  adverse  circumstances  than  the  Schachtschneiders,  and  no  young 
man  in  this  township  is  more  highly  respected  than  Otto  Schachtschneider, 
the  subject  of  this  sketch. 


THOMAS  LARSON. 


The  late  Thomas  Larson,  who  was  a  well-known  citizen  of  Dane  Prairie 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  who  was  prominent  in  the 
civic  and  political  life  of  his  community  during  his  life  time,  was  torn  at 
Chicago,  Illinois,  August  18,  1857. 

Mr.  Larson  was  the  son  of  Peter  and  Christine  Larson,  who  were 
natives  of  Norway  and  who  grew  to  manhood  and  womanhood  in  that 
country.  Peter  Larson  was  thrice  married.  After  coming  to  America  he 
was  married  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  to  Christine  Larson.  Shortly  after  his 
marriage,  he  moved  to  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  lived  for  a 
Eew  years.  In  1872  he  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  homesteading  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  the  southern  part  of  Dane  Prairie  township, 
which  at  that  time  was  a  wilderness.  During  the  next  few  years,  he  improved 
the  farm  and  erected  modern  buildings,  living  on  the  farm  until  his  death 
in   [905      His  widow  is  still  living  and  makes  her  home  with  her  son.  Chris- 


102  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

tian.  They  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  of  whom  Louis  is  a  farmer 
in  one  of  the  western  states;  John  lives  one  and  one-half  miles  east  of  the 
Thomas  Larson  farm;  Thomas  F.  was  the  third  child;  Carrie,  who  married 
Jens  Peterson,  is  deceased;  Christian  lives  on  his  father's  homestead  farm; 
Anna,  who  is  a  resident  of  Fergus  Falls,  has  been  twice  married,  the  first 
time  to  Christian  Dahl  and  the  second  time  to  Sorren  Larson;  Henrietta, 
who  is  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  John  McGrath,  who  is  also  deceased; 
Martin  is  a  farmer  in  Tumuli  township;  Ludwig  is  a  dentist  at  Finley.  North 
Dakota;  and  Emma,  who  married  Andrew  Eollingmoe,  lives  in  Fergus 
Falls. 

Thomas  Larson  was  e  cated  in  the  common  schools  of  Fergus  Falls 
and  in  the  high  school.  H  was  reared  on  the  farm  and  in  1892  purchased 
about  two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  immediately 
thereafter  erecting  a  new  barn  and  a  new  house.  lie  lived  upon  the  farm 
until  his  death  and  was  always  engaged  in  general  farming.  Some  years 
before  Mr.  Larson's  marriage,  he  operated  a  threshing  machine  and  a  well- 
drilling  outfit,  and  drilled  many  wells  in  Otter  Tail  county,  but  at  the  time 
of  his  marriage  he  sold  his  threshing  machine  and  well-drilling  outfit. 

On  March  26,  1892,  Thomas  Larson  was  married  to  Mary  Thompson, 
a  native  of  near  Trondhjem,  Norway,  where  she  was  born  on  December  25, 
[862.  Mrs.  Larson  is  the  daughter  of  Bernt  and  Inger  (Guldseth)  Thomp- 
son, who  came  to  America  in  a  sailing  vessel  in  1864.  After  living  in  Hud- 
son county  for  two  years,  they  moved  to  St.  Olaf  township.  Otter  Tail 
county,  in  1866.  After  living  there  for  one  year,  they  moved  to  Dane 
Prairie  township,  and  homesteaded  a  quarter  section  of  land  in  section  21. 
There  they  lived  for  some  years  and  then  sold  out  to  their  son,  Nels  B., 
purchasing  one  hundred  acres  of  land  across  the  lake,  where  Mrs.  Larson's 
father  died  on  August  16,  1002.  The  mother  lived  with  her  daughter, 
Mrs.  Larson,  until  her  death  on  July  3,  TQ.04.  They  were  the  parents  of 
twelve  children,  six  of  whom  are  living.  Mrs.  Larson's  father  was  a  man 
of  retiring  disposition.  When  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  he  traveled 
from  Hudson  county  to  St.  Paul  by  rail  and  then  up  the  Mississippi  by  boat 
to  St.  Cloud.  From  St.  Cloud,  he  traveled  by  ox  team  to  Otter  Tail  county. 
spending  two  weeks  on  the  way.     He  was  an  ardent  Republican. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Thomas  Larson  were  the  parents  of  two  children.  1  .  .r.i, 
born  on  March  3,  1894,  who  was  graduated  from  the  Park  Region  Luther 
College  in  iqii  and,  after  attending  tin-  St.  ('loud  normal,  has  been  engaged 
in  teaching;  and  Bernhard,  January  6,  1807.  who  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools.  The  father  of  these  children,  the  late  Thomas  Larson,  died  on 
March  15.  1908. 

Mr.    Larson   was   an  ardent    Republican  and   served   in   many  positions 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  IO^ 

of  trust  and  responsibility.  He  tilled  the  office  of  township  clerk  for  fifteen 
years  and  was  also  a  member  of  the  school  board  from  the  time  he  was 
twenty-one  years  old  until  his  death.  He  could  always  be  found  at  Repub- 
lican conventions  and  was  extremely  popular  in  politics.  Had  he  lived,  he 
would  have  been  a  candidate  for  the  Legislature.  Mr.  Larson  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Swan  Lake  Lutheran  church  and  his  widow  is  an  active  worker 
in  this  church  today. 


LOUIS  CORNELIUS  OLSON. 

Louis  Cornelius  Olson,  a  member  of  the  an  of  Olson  Brothers,  who 
operate  a  retail  business  in  clothing  and  men's  furnishings  at  Battle  Lake, 
Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Clitherall  township,  wl  ere  he  was  born  on  March 
22,  1883,  on  a  farm. 

Mr.  Olson  is  the  son  of  Christian  and  Louise  (Hanson)  Olson,  who 
were  natives  of  Eidsvold,  Norway.  Mr.  Olson's  parents  came  to  America 
separately  about  i860  and.  after  arriving  in  America,  settled  in  Goodhue 
county,  Minnesota,  where  they  were  married.  One  year  later  they  immi- 
grated to  (  )tter  Tail  county,  homesteading  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of 
land  in  Clitherall  township,  at  a  time  and  place  where  the  nearest  railroad 
station  was  at  St.  <  loud,  sixty  miles  away.  The  Olson  homestead  farm 
was  originally  wild  land. 

Christian  Olson  built  a  dugout  souk-  forty  rods  away  from  the  present 
house,  and  after  two  years  replaced  this  dugout  with  a  log  house.  From 
time  to  time,  additional  acres  of  the  farm  were  put  under  cultivation  and 
'Mr.  Olson  came  eventually  to  own  two  hundred  and  forty  acres,  some  of 
which  was  covered  with  timber.  Eventually,  the  log  house  was  replaced 
with  a  commodious  frame  house,  in  which  the  family  lived  until  the  spring 
of  1007.  when  they  sold,  the  farm  and  moved  to  Battle  Lake,  where  they 
have  since  lived  retired.  Christian  Olson  is  seventy-one  years  old  and  his 
good  wife,  who  is  also  still  living,  is  only  three  years  his  junior,  lie  has 
been  prominent  in  the  political  and  civic  life  of  this  county  and,  until  recently, 
voted  the  Republican  ticket,  but  is  now  identified  with  the  Prohibition  party. 
He  and  his  wife  arc  members  of  the  Free  Lutheran  church. 

Of  the  nine  children  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Christian  Olson,  the  eldest 
died  in  infancy;  Marvin  1\..  who  is  the  manager  of  the  Dwight  Farm  and 
Land  Company  and  the  Farmers'  Elevator  Company,  resides  at  Dwight, 
North  Dakota:  Henry  is  the  postmaster  at  Battle  Lake  and  the  partner  of 
his  brother  in  the  clothing  and  furnishing  business:  Thorvald  and  Hans 
both  died  at  the  age  of  eighl  years;  Louis  Cornelius  is  the  subject  of  this 
sketch;  Thea  is  the  wife  of  Charles  Peterson,  a  farmer  of  near  McCluskey, 
North  Dakota;   Mary,  who  is  unmarried  and  at  home,  is  employed  as  assist- 


104  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

ant  postmaster;  Hattie,  who  taught  for  some  years  at  Wadena  and  later  at 
Battle  Lake  and  lives  at  home. 

Louis  Cornelius  Olson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Clitherall 
township  and  at  the  Park  Region  Luther  College.  He  lived  on  the  farm 
until  1910,  managing  the  farm  after  his  father  had  retired.  In  1910  Mr. 
Olson  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Meade  county, 
South  Dakota,  and  there  he  lived  for  eighteen  months,  when  he  returned 
to  Battle  Lake  and  became  assistant  postmaster  under  his  brother,  Henry. 
After  serving  one  year  as  assistant  postmaster,  Mr.  Olson  engaged  in  part- 
nership with  his  brother.  They  purchased  the  H.  L.  Wagner  clothing  and 
furnishing  business  on  Lake  street  and  this  business  is  now  managed  by 
Louis  C.  Olson. 

On  September  21,  1907,  Louis  C.  <  >lson  was  married  to  Emma  Peter- 
son, a  native  of  Sweden  and  the  daughter  of  Peter  Nelson.  Mrs.  Olson 
came  to  America  to  join  her  brothers,  who  were  already  in  this  country. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Olson  have  no  children. 

Louis  C.  Olson  is  independent  in  politics.  He  and  his  wife  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Free  Lutheran  church. 


TOSTEX  JACOBSON. 

Tosten  Jacobson,  an  enterprising  fanner  of  Dane  Prairie  township. 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  was  born  on  the  farm  where  he  now  lives  in 
Dane  Prairie  township.  November  I,  1876.  Mr.  Jacobson  is  the  son  of 
Hans  and  Mallena   1  Torstenson)   Jacobson. 

Mr.  Jacobson's  paternal  grandparents  were  Hans  and  Mary  Jacobson, 
who  were  natives  of  Denmark  and  who  spent  their  entire  lives  in  that  conn- 
try.  The  grandfather  was  a  soldier  in  the  army  and  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion. They  were  the  parent-  of  three  sons,  of  whom  Hans,  the  father  of 
Tosten,  was  the  eldest.  The  other  two  children  were  Sakereas,  who  died  in 
Montana,  where  he  was  a  fanner;  and  Jens,  who  was  a  tailor  in  Minne- 
apolis and  died  there.  The  paternal  grandfather  was  twice  married  and 
had  two  daughters  by  his  second  marriage,  who  died  in  Denmark.  Mr. 
Jacobson's  maternal  grandparents  were  Torsten  rorstenson  and  Mallena 
Knutson,  natives  of  Norway,  who  immigrated  to  America  about  l868, 
settling  in  Tordenskjold  township,  where  the  maternal  grandfather  home- 
steaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  and  where  both  he  and  his 
wife  died.  They  had  two  sons  and  four  daughters.  Of  these,  Martha  died 
at  the  age  of  eighteen  years  in  Norway:  Brita,  who  married  Uberl  Joseph- 
son,  died  in  Tordenskjold  township:  Mallena  is  the  mother  of  Mr.  Jacobson; 
Kari.  who  married  Samuel  Moklo,  lives  near  Battle  Lake;  Martha,  the 
widow   of    Jacob   Thompson,    lives   near   Underwood:    Tosten.    who   lives   in 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  IO5 

Tordenskjold  township,  is  referred  to  elsewhere  in  this  volume;  Knut  died 
unmarried  in  Otter  Tail  county. 

Mr.  Jacobson's  father  was  born  on  June  20,  1840,  at  Guslau,  Denmark, 
and  his  mother  born  on  June  12,  1852,  near  Christiana,  Norway.  She  was 
brought  to  America  by  her  parents  when  sixteen  years  old.  Her  husband 
came  to  America  when  he  was  thirty  years  old,  being  accompanied  to  this 
country  by  his  brother,  Jens.  They  came  to  this  country  in  a  sailing  vessel 
and  spent  three  weeks  in  making  the  voyage.  After  stopping  about  one 
month  in  southern  Minnesota,  they  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  intended 
to  take  up  a  homestead.  After  arriving  in  this  county,  they  purchased  a 
team  of  oxen  and  a  wagon.  Jens  homesteaded  a  tract  of  land  in  Tordensk- 
jold township.  Mr.  Jacobson's  father,  Hans  Jacobson,  homesteaded  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  12,  of  Dane  Prairie  township.  After- 
ward he  erected  a  log  house  on  Jens'  homestead  farm  and  then  erected  a 
log  house  about  ten  rods  east  of  his  present  house. 

The  brothers  worked  together  clearing  and  breaking  the  land.  Later 
each  was  able  to  buy  a  team.  Hans  Jacobson  kept  on  with  his  improvements 
and  lived  in  the  original  house  until  his  death  in  1887.  His  widow  is  still 
living.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Tordenskjold  township  Lutheran  church 
as  was  also  her  husband,  who  was  the  founder  of  the  church.  Hans  and 
Mallena  (Torstenson)  Jacobson  were  the  parents  of  six  children.  Mary. 
who  married  Ole  Eggen  and  lives  in  Orwell  township;  Tosten,  the  subject 
of  this  sketch;  Jacob,  who  lives  at  home;  Martin,  who  is  a  farmer  in  Orwell 
township  and  married  Mary  Sunberg;  Hannah,  who  lives  at  home;  and 
Jens,  who  died  at  the  age  of  two  years.  Mrs.  Hans  Jacobson  had  one  child 
by  a  former  marriage,  Jensena,  who  i-  now  the  wife  of  Alfred  Samison,  of 
Montana. 

Tosten  Jacobson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  <  >tter  Tail  county 
and  was  reared  on  a  farm  in  this  county.  In  partnership  with  his  brother, 
Jacob,  he  took  over  the  management  of  the  home  farm  and  ha<  since 
operated  it.  They  are  engaged  in  general  farming  and  stock  raising  and 
have  been  very  successful.  Under  the  able  management  of  the  two  brothers, 
the  farm  has  been  kept  in  a  very  high  state  of  cultivation.  The  buildings 
are  all  well  painted  and  thoroughly  modern.  Tosten  Jacobson  is  a  member 
of  the  Lutheran  church.  Formerly,  he  was  a  member  of  the  Modern  \\  ood- 
men  of  America. 

Mrs.  Hans  Jacobson,  the  mother  of  Tosten  Jacobson.  has  lived  on  the 
present  farm  for  forty-seven  years.  When  the  family  first  came  to  '  >tter 
Tail  county.  Indians  were  plentiful  in  this  vicinity,  but  were  always  friendly. 
Mr.  Tacobson  himself  remembers  the  Indians  very  well  and  especially  when 
they  came  to  watch  him  plowing  as  a  boy.     In  tin'-;  vicinity  the  Indian-  were 


[06  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

honorable  and  upright  in  their  relations  with  the  white  settlers  and  were 
never  known  to  steal.  Mr.  Jacobson  himself  furnished  bread  to  one  Indian 
during  a  period  of  about  ten  years. 


HANS  P.  BERG. 


Of  the  citizens  of  Vining  engaged  in  business,  Hans  P.  Berg  is  one 
of  the  best  known.  A  man  who  has  taken  an  active  interest  in  the  develop- 
ment of  the  county  and  the  promotion  and  advancement  of  the  town  of 
his  residence,  he  is  among  those  men  who  for  their  part  in  community 
affairs  are  given  a  conspicuous  rank  in  the  roll  of  citizenship  of  Otter  Tail 
county. 

Hans  P.  -Berg  was  burn  in  Trondhjem,  Norway,  July  13,  1849,  the 
son  of  Haldor  Haldorson  and  Guriana  Ivorson,  who  were  born  at  the  same 
place,  the  father  in  the  year  1822  and  the  mother  in  the  year  1819.  Haldor 
Haldorson  was  a  shoemaker  in  his  native  land,  a  trade  which  he  followed 
for  some  time  and  then  engaged  in  the  business  of  a  contractor  and  builder 
until  his  death  in  the  1894.  he  and  his  wife  being  drowned  in  a  flood  which 
overswept  their  small  farm  in  tiiat  year.  To  Haldor  Haldorson  and  Guriana 
[vorson  were  born  two  children:  Hans  P.,  the  subject  of  tins  sketch,  and 
Gunirius  H.,  who  was  a  merchant  at  Surrey,  North  Dakota,  where  he  died 
during  the  winter  of  1915,  his  remains  being  brought  to  Vining,  Minne- 
sota, "ii  February  22,  for  interment. 

Hans  P.  Berg  was  educated  in  a  public  school  which  moved  from  farm 
to  farm,  in  Norway,  stopping  for  two  days  in  each  week  where  students 
were  brought  together.  After  his  school  days  Hans  P.  Berg  worked  for  a 
time  on  a  farm,  and  in  1871  went  to  the  city  of  I  rondhjem,  where  lie  learned 
the  trade  of  a  horse-shoer  and  blacksmith,  later  following  his  trade  for 
sewn  years  with  the  cavalry  of  Norway,  and  then  after  a  short  time  he 
came  to  America,  in  1881,  and  located  at  the  city  of  Minneapolis,  Minnesota, 
where  for  the  next  two  months  he  was  employed  at  a  saw-mill.  Later  Hans 
P  Berk  went  to  Underwood  where  he  took  a  position  with  the  Kellogg 
(  hair  Company,  where  he  remained  for  one  and  one-half  years  and  then 
came  to  the  town  of  Vining  and  established  a.  blacksmith  shop  which  he 
conducted  for  about  five  years.  He  then  went  to  the  Pacific  coasl  ami  located 
in  British  Columbia  and  then  in  the  state  of  Washington,  later  returning  to 
(  i;ter  Tail  county  and  settling  on  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  which  he  had  home- 
teaded  in  the  year  [883.  Mr.  Berk  lived  on  his  farm  for  about  two  years 
and  then  became  a  wheat  buyer  for  tin-  fanner-'  Elevator  Company,  a  busi- 
ness which  lie  followed  for  sixteen  years.  In  [895  I  Ian-  P.  Berg  entered 
into  partnership  with  the  linn  of  Nyhus  &  Berg,  a  business  in  which  Mr. 
vas  interested  for  eleven  years  when  he  disposed  of  his  holdings  and 


OTTER    TAIL    Oil'XTV.    MINNESOTA.  IO~ 

returned  to  the  business  of  buying  wheat  until  the  year  1911,  when  he 
established  a  store  for  the  sale  of  flour,  feed  and  grain,  together  with  farm 
implements,  a  business  in  which  he  is  now  successfully  engaged.  Hans  P. 
Berg  has  erected  a  splendid  building  fur  his  business  and  among  other 
improvements  has  built  a  modern  home,  where  he  lives. 

Not  only  in  business  pursuits  but  in  public  life,  has  Hans  P.  Berg  been 
an  important  element  of  the  citizenship  of  Yining  and  of  (  >tter  Tail  county. 
Mr.  Berg  has  served  well  as  a  member  of  the  village  council  and  at  the 
present  time  is  the  occupant  of  the  important  office  of  assessor.  In  politics 
.Mr.  Berg  is  an  ardent  Republican.  Hans  P.  Berg  is  a  member  of  the  United 
Lutheran  church  and  he  is  affiliated  with  the  society  of  the  Sons  of  Norway. 

During  the  year  1873  Hans  P.  Berg  was  married  to  Marit  Anderson, 
who  was  born  in  Norway,  in  which  country  she  and  Mr.  Berg  were  mar- 
ried and  a  year  after  the  marriage  she  came  to  America  to  join  her  husband 
who  had  preceded  her.  and  about  five  years  later  she  died.  Hans  P.  and 
Marit  Berg  were  the  parents  of  one  daughter,  who  married  Ole  Anderson, 
an  insurance  man. 

Hans  1'.  Berg  was  married,  secondly,  during  the  year  1905,  to  Martha 
Berg,  who  was  the  daughter  of  Olaus  Berg  and  wife.  Olaus  Berg  was  a 
farmer  who  lived  near  Battle  Lake.  He  died  about  the  year  1898.  To  the 
second  marriage  of  Hans  P.  Berg  no  children  were  born. 

Hans  P.  Berg  is  one  of  the  men  of  Otter  Tail  county  who  have  done 
much  for  the  progress  and  advancement  of  living  conditions  and  for  the 
promotion  of  business  prosperity  in  the  locality,  and  is  a  man  who,  with 
his  wife,  are  esteemed  and  highly  respected  residents  of  the  town  of  Vining. 


HENRY  OLSON. 


Henry  Olson,  who  has  served  as  postmaster  at  Battle  Lake.  Minnesota, 
for  the  past  fifteen  years  and  who  is  vice-president  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Battle  Lake  and  is  now  engaged  in  partnership  with  his  brother 
in  the  mercantile  business  at  Battle  Lake,  is  a  native  of  Clitherall  township. 
I  )tter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  was  born  on  August  iq,  1873.  Mr. 
Olson  was  born  three  and  one-half  miles  south  of  Battle  Lake. 

Mic  parents  of  Henry  Olson  ate  Christian  Olson  and  Louise  (II 
Olson,    who    were    born    at    Eidsvold.    Norway.      They    came    separately    to 
America  before  their  marriage,  his  father  in    [867  and  his  mother  in   [868, 

and   settled   in   (i lhue   count  v.    Minnesota,    where   they   were   married.      In 

1870  they  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  homesteaded  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  of  land  in  Clitherall  township.  The  land  was  prairie  and  the 
nearest  railroad  was  at  St  <  'loud,  sixty  miles  away.  Christian  Olson  built 
a  dugout  about    forty  rods   from  the  present  house  and  began   to  cultivate 


108  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

the  prairie.  After  two  years  he  built  a  log  house.  He  prospered  and,  in 
tune,  came  to  own  two  hundred  and  forty  acres,  including  some  timber 
land.  Finally,  he  built  a  frame  house,  where  he  lived  until  the  spring  of 
1907,  when  he  sold  the  farm  and  retired  to  a  home  in  Battle  Lake,  where 
he  and  his  wife  are  now  living,  the  former  at  the  age  of  seventy-one  and 
the  latter  three  years  his  junior.  Christian  Olson  has  filled  many  township 
and  local  offices.  Formerly  he  was  identified  with  the  Republican  party, 
but  lately  has  been  voting  the  Prohibition  ticket.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are 
members  of  the  Free  Lutheran  church. 

Christian  and  Louise  (Hanson)  Olson  were  the  parents  of  nine  chil- 
dren, the  firstborn  died  in  infancy;  Marvin  R.,  who  lives  at  Dwight,  North 
Dakota,  is  manager  of  the  Dwight  Farm  and  Land  Company  and  manager 
of  the  Farmers'  Flevator  Company;  Henry  is  the  subject  of  this  sketch; 
Thorvald  died  at  the  age  of  eight  years;  Hans  also  died  at  the  age  of  eight; 
Louis  Cornelius  is  referred  to  elsewhere  in  this  volume;  Thea  married 
Charles  Peterson,  a  farmer  living  near  McCluskey,  North  Dakota:  Mary, 
who  is  unmarried,  is  the  assistant  postmaster  at  Battle  Lake  and  lives  at 
home  with  her  parents;  Hattie  is  a  teacher  and  lives  at  home.  She  taught 
for  some  years  in  the  Battle  Lake  schools  and  later  in  'Wadena,  but  on 
account  of  ill  health  had  to  lay  down  the  work. 

Henrv  <  llson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Clitherall  township 
and  at  Battle  Lake.  He  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  began  life  as  a  clerk 
for  <  )rris  Albertson  ai  Battle  Lake  in  1891.  After  working  for  Mr.  Albert- 
son  for  three  years,  he  was  employed  for  three  years  as  a  traveling  sales- 
man for  a  wholesale  fruit  company.  In  1897.  in  partnership  with  Christ 
Leithe,  Mr.  Olson,  under  the  firm  name  of  Olson  &  Leithe,  engaged  in  the 
mercantile  business  in  the  building  now  occupied  by  P.  J.  Elseth.  After 
being  engaged  in  business  for  three  years,  Mr.  Olson  was  appointed  post- 
mister  on  March  21,  1901,  and  has  served  continuously  as  postmaster  ever 
since. 

Mr.  Olson  confined  his  activities  to  the  postoffke  until  October  1,  1913, 
when  he  went  into  partnership  with  his  brother,  Louis  C,  and  purchased 
the  II.  L  Wagner  clothing  and  furnishing  store,  which  has  since  been 
operated  under  the  firm  name  of  Olson  Brothers.  Mr.  Olson  owns  the 
building  in  which  the  store  is  housed  and  lives  over  the  store.  He  is  vice- 
president  of  the  hirst  National  I 'auk  of  Battle  Lake  and  has  served  in  this 
capacity  since  its  organization  in  the  early  pari  of   1007. 

In  August,  1896.  Henry  Olson  was  married  to  Lizzie  Olson,  the  daugh- 
ter of  Hans  Olson  Ekeberg,  an  old  settler  of  Henning,  Minnesota.  Mis. 
Olson  was  born  near  Faribault,  Minnesota,  and  died  on  April  15,  1900, 
leaving  two  children,  Ilarlev  Luman,  horn  on  September  8.  1898,  and  Ethel 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  IO9 

Lizzie  Isola,  April  i,  1900.  Mr.  Olson  was  married,  secondly,  on  June  18, 
1901,  to  Julia  Herness,  a  native  of  Eagle  Lake  township  and  the  daughter 
of  Lars  Herness,  an  old  settler  of  Otter  Tail  county,  who  came  here  in  1868. 
To  the  second  marriage,  there  have  been  born  two  children,  Ruth  Henrietta, 
born  on  October  7,  1908,  and  Reuben  Joseph,  May  25,  1910. 

Mr.  Olson  has  served  a  year  as  a  member  of  the  village  council.  He 
and  his  wife  and  the  members  of  the  Olson  family  belong  to  the  United 
Lutheran  church  and  are  active  in  the  work  of  the  church.  Henry  Olson 
is  a  good  man  and  a  good  citizen.  He  has  been  conscientious  in  the  per- 
formance of  every  public  duty  and  has  prospered  in  his  own  private  affairs. 


CHRISTIAN  E.  BERG. 


Among  the  men  of  success  in  business  pursuits  at  Vining,  Otter  Tail 
county,  is  Christian  E.  Berg,  who  as  a  merchant  of  hardware  and  furniture 
has  brought  to  the  community  its  only  convenience  in  this  line,  and  who 
as  a  citizen  in  private  life  and  as  the  occupant  of  public  office  has  taken  no 
minor  part  in  the  advancement  and  progress  of  the  various  activities  of  the 
locality. 

(  hristian  E.  Berg  was  born  in  Norway  twenty  miles  north  of  the  city 
of  Trondhjem,  the  son  of  Olaus  and  Rebecca  I 'erg.  who  were  born  at 
Trondhjem,  and  later  were  married  in  the  same  locality,  Olaus  Berg  was 
a  farmer  who  owned  extensive  land  interests  in  Norway  where  he  lived 
until  about  the  year  1889  when,  with  his  wife,  he  came  to  America  and 
settled  in  Everts  township,  northeast  of  Battle  Lake,  in  Otter  Tail  county, 
where  he  died.  His  wife.  Rebecca  Berg,  moved  to  the  town  of  Vining, 
where  she  died  some  time  later.  Olaus  and  Rebecca  Berg  were  members 
and  active  workers  in  the  United  Lutheran  church.  To  the  marriage  of 
Olaus  and  Rebecca  Berg  were  burn  the  following  children:  Christian  E., 
the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Martha,  who  married  Hans  P.  Berg,  a  merchant 
of  Vining,  Minnesota:  and  Kari,  who  married  Martin  ECnutson  and  lives 
northeast  of  Battle  Lake. 

(  hristian  E.  Berg  was  educated  in  the  public  school  in  Norway,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  and  then  studied  for  two  years  in  a  college  of  his 
native  land.  In  1887  he  came  to  America  and  located  at  Battle  Lake. 
Minnesota,  where  he  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Everts 
township  and  there  lived  for  about  twenty  years,  after  which  he  came  to 
the  town  of  Vining  and  was  employed  in  a  hardware  store  until  the  year 
1906.  when  he  established  himself  in  the  hardware  and  furniture  business, 
in  which  he  has  since  been  engaged,  being  the  only  merchant  of  the  town 
carrying  a  like  stock. 

•  'hristian   E.  Berg  is  also  interested  as  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers' 


IIO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Elevator  Company,  at  Vining,  and  also  interested  in  a  similar  industry  at 
Cattle  Lake.  Air.  Berg  has  served  his  community  in  the  office  of  justice  of 
the  peace,  as  treasurer  of  the  school  district,  and  tot  ten  years  was  school 
director,  also  being  for  seventeen  years  supervisor  of  the  township  of 
Everts,     in  politics  Air.    Berg  is  an  ardent    Republican. 

Christian  E.  Berg  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 
an  organization  which  honored  him  by  his  election  to  the  office  of  consul. 
Air.  Berg  is  also  affiliated  with  the  Sous  of  Norway,  for  which  organization 
he  served  some  years  as  secretary.     Christian  E.   Berg  never  married. 

Christian  E.  Uerg  is  one  of  the  highly  respected  and  honored  men  of 
Utter  Tail  count}"  and  a  man  who  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  leaders  in 
business  affairs  and  in  general  matters  of  the  county. 


THOMAS  A.  RANSTAD. 


Thomas  A.  Ranstad,  a  prosperous  automobile  dealer  of  Battle  Lake, 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  who  was  formerly  engaged  in  railroad  work, 
but  who  has  lately  been  engaged  in  various  lines  of  the  mercantile  business, 
is  a  native  of  Flekkefjord,  Norway,  where  he  was  born  on  August  10,  1858. 

Mr.  Ranstad  is  the  son  of  Aslak  and  Karen  (Tonette)  Ranstad.  Mr. 
Ranstad's  parents  never  came  to  .America.  His  father  was  a  farmer  and 
landowner  in  his  native  land  and  both  bis  father  and  mother  died  in  Nor- 
way. They  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  reared  a  family  of 
three  children,  Andreas,  who  was  a  farmer,  is  deceased;  Mallena,  who  died 
when  seven  years  of  age;  and  Thomas  A.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  who 
was  the  only  one  of  the   family  who  ever  came  to  America. 

Educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway  and  reared  on  the  farm. 
Thomas  A.  Ranstad  was  employed  on  the  farm  until  he  had  reached  his 
majority,  when  he  came  to  America.  Upon  reaching  this  country  in  1879, 
Mr.  Ranstad  located  at  Willmar,  Minnesota,  where  he  divided  his  energy 
and  activities  between  the  farm  and  railroad  work.  For  two  years  he  was 
foreman  of  the  yards  of  the  Great  Northern  railroad  at  Breckenridge  and 
had  the  honor  to  lav  the  first  rail  from  the  Aberdeen  branch  of  the  Great 
Northern  railroad  at  Breckenridge  in  [886.  During  [886  and  a  part  of 
[887,  Mr.  Ranstad  spent  six  months  in  Norwaj  on  a  pleasure  trip,  but  upon 
his  return  to  America  resumed  his  position  as  foreman  of  the  (beat  Northern 
yards  at  Breckenridge.  Subsequently,  he  became  roadmaster  of  the  Aber- 
deen branch  of  the  Greal  Northern  and.  in  the  spring  of  18S8.  left  the  rail- 
road work  and  for  a  time  lived  at  Rutland.  North  Dakota,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  the  retail  sale  of  flour,  feed.  fuel.  etc.  'The  next  year,  he  engaged 
in  the  hardware  and  machinery  business  and  continued  in  tin'-;  business  until 
[896,  when  be  came  to  Battle  lake  and  engaged  in  the  same  line  of  business 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  Ill 

on  Lake  street.  ['\\<>  years  later,  in  [898,  Mr.  Ranstad  took  .;  partner  into 
the  firm,  which  became  that  of  Ranstad  &  I  Ian-en  This  partnership  lasted 
eight  years  and  a  large  and  prosperous  business  was  built  up.  In  1912  Mr. 
Ranstad  sold  out  the  hardware  business  but  still  retains  his  interest  in  the 
implement  business.  In  1912  he  became  the  agent  in  this  section  for  the 
Ford  automobiles  and  is  engaged  in  this  business  in  partnership  with  J.  I!. 
Thompson.     The    firm    handles    about    seventy-five    automobiles    each    year. 

In  1S89  Thomas  A.  Ranstad  was  married  to  Gurine  Olson,  a  native 
of  Wisconsin,  and  to  them  have  been  born  three  children.  Albert,  Carl  and 
.Millard.  Albert  is  employed  in  a  wholesale  hardware  store  at  St.  Paul. 
Carl  is  a  barber  at  Battle  Lake.  .Millard  is  employed  by  the  International 
Harvester  Company  at  St.  (loud.  The  mother  of  these  children  died  in 
1897.  and  alwut  1901  Mr.  Ranstad  was  married  to  Hilda  Lundberg.  To 
this  second  union  have  been  horn  four  children.  Harold.  Lloyd,  Helen  and 
Beatrice. 

In  [912  Mr.  Ranstad  and  Mr.  Thompson  built  a  new  garage  out  of 
concrete.  It  is  a  substantial  building,  forty  by  one  hundred  and  forty  feet. 
Mr.  Ranstad  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Otter  Tail  county  sanitarium, 
lie  ha-  been  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  since  its  organization.  This 
sanitarium  is  located  on  Otter  Tail  lake. 

Mr.  Ranstad  has  served  a  year  as  mayor  of  Rattle  Lake  and  two  years 
as  a  member  of  the  school  board.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  village  coun- 
cil. In  politics,  Mr.  Ranstad  is  a  Republican.  Fraternally,  he  is  a  member 
of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 


OSCAR  F.  LARSON. 


Oscar  I  .  Larson,  farmer,  of  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  was 
born  on  June  29,  1857.  in  Sweden,  and  is  a  son  of  Lars  and  Anna  Ander- 
son, lie  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  his  native  country,  and  assisted  his 
father  on  the  farm  until  1883,  when  he  came  to  America,  settling  at  Wilkes- 
barre,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  worked  in  the  coal  mines.  In  1885  he  came 
to  Otter  Tail  county,  remaining  one  year,  and  for  the  next  five  years  was 
employed  in  various  pursuits  in  different  state-.  In  [890  he  bought  his 
presenl  farm,  consisting  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  in  Carlisle  town 
ship,  where  he  has  ^ince  lived.  Mr.  Larson  has  put  all  the  improvements 
on  his  place,  where  he  has  followed  general  farming  and  -tock  raising, 
including  eight  or  nine  good  cow-.  In  politic-.  Mr.  Larson  i-  an  independ- 
ent voter.  He  is  a  member  of  the  United  Lutheran  church.  In  .addition 
to  buildings  and  other  valuable  improvements,  Mr.  Larson  ha-  planted  a 
line  grove  and  a  g 1  orchard  near  his  house. 

Lars    \mlcr-on.    father  of  ( War   F.,   was  born  in    [809,  in   Sweden,  as 


112  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

was  also  his  wife,  Anna  Anderson.  They  were  farmers  and  spent  their 
entire  life  in  their  native  country. 

(  (scar  F.  Larson  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1890,  with  Christina  John- 
son, a  native  of  Norway,  by  whom  he  has  had  two  children:  Alma  L., 
who  became  the  wife  of  'William  A.  Gardiner,  and  has  one  child.  Harold: 
Roy,  the  second  child,  is  at  home  with  his  parents. 

Mr.  Larson  is  a  splendid  example  of  the  thrifty  and  industrious  citi- 
zen, and  his  career  has  been  characterized  by  a  marked  degree  of   success. 


REV.  GEORGE  J.  RAUCH. 

Born  in  Metre  Grove,  Oak  township,  Stearns  county,  Minnesota.  Sep- 
tember 10.  [881,  Rev,  George  J.  Ranch,  pastor  of  the  church  of  Our  Lady 
of  Victory,  of  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  is  the  son  of  Michael  and  Ann 
Dorothy  (Weber)    Ranch. 

Michael  Rauch  was  a  native  of  Bavaria,  Germany,  and  his  wife  also  a 
native  of  the  German  Empire,  having  been  born  near  Mainz.  Michael 
Rauch  was  but  three  years  old  when  he  came  to  America  with  his  parents  in 
1857.  After  landing  in  America,  they  came  to  Minnesota,  locating  at  St. 
Joseph,  in  Stearns  count}',  where  they  remained  for  one  year  and  then  moved 
to  Meire  Grove,  in  the  same  county,  and  it  was  in  Stearns  county  that 
Michael  Rauch  was  reared  to  manhood.  Father  Rauch's  mother,  wdio 
before  her  marriage  was  \nn  Dorothy  'Weber,  came  to  America  in  1867 
with  her  parents,  who  settled  at  Meire  Grove. 

Michael  Rauch  grew  to  manhood  in  Stearns  county  anil,  after  attain- 
ing maturity,  took  up  farming  as  a  business.  Later  he  became  a  contractor 
and  builder  and  about  [883,  moved  to  Melrose.  Minnesota,  and  in  iqio 
moved  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  where  he  is  still  living.  It  was  at 
Melrose  that  Father  Rauch  grew  to  manhood  and  obtained  his  early  schooling. 

In  1804  George  J.  Rauch  entered  St.  John's  <  'ollege,  where  he  received 
a  classical  education.  !  [e  was  a  student  in  St.  John's  Seminary  for  five  years 
and  at  St.  John's  College  tor  six  years,  altogether  a  period  of  eleven  years. 
Ordained  to  (be  h(  h  priesthood  at  Melrose,  bather  Rauch  became  assistant 
pastor  of  the  church  at  Si.  Boniface  and  paster  of  St.  Patrick's  church. 

In  1008  be  was  transferred  to  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  has  enjoyed  a 
wider  opportunity  for  Christian  work.  Before  long  he  realized  the  need  for 
the  erection  of  a  new  church  and.  having  gone  about  it  systematically,  was 
able,  in  mi  |,  to  complete  a  mosl  desirable  edifice  of  brick,  which  has  a  seat- 
ing capacity  of  from  four  to  live  hundred  people,  and  at  the  same  time 
erected  .1  commodious  and  comfortable  parish  house. 

Rev.   George  J.    Rauch   has  performed   a   splendid   work   in  the  parish 


OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA.  II3 

of  Our  Lady  of  Victory  and  is  gradually  growing  in  influence  and  favor. 
His  fine  personality  and  his  kindly  Christian  bearing  have  endeared  him  to 
the  hearts  of  all  who  live  in  his  parish  as  well  as  to  the  community  at  large 
and  he  enjoys  the  profound  respect  of  all. 


CHARLES  A.  LUND. 


Charles  A.  Lund  by  his  administrative  ability  and  his  powers  as  a  busi- 
ness man,  has  lent  new  dignity  and  prestige  to  a  family  whose  name  has 
been  honorably  linked  with  the  history  of  Otter  Tail  county  for  a  period  of 
over  thirty  years.  As  a  son  of  one  of  the  most  successful  agriculturists  of 
the  section  of  Minnesota  in  which  he  lives,  he  has  stood  as  an  exponent  of 
that  strong  and  noble  manhood  which  characterized  so  admirably  the  life 
of  his  father.  His  career  has  been  one  of  consecutive  industry  and  his 
success  has  nut  been  an  accident,  but  a  logical  result.  As  cashier  of  the 
bank  at  Vining,  he  has  served  with  a  devotion  to  duty  which  has  been  both 
profitable  and  pleasing  to  the  public  at  large.  Charles  A.  Lund  is  a  son 
of  Andrew  Lund,  whose  life  was  remarkable  for  its  great  achievement  and 
unqualified  success. 

Andrew  T.  Lund  was  born  near  Namsos.  Norway,  on  the  22nd  of 
August,  1848.  He  was  the  son  of  Torger  Balzerson,  a  native  of  Alstahaug, 
Helegeland,  Norway,  and  Boletta  Margaretta  Anderson,  a  native  of  Fosnes, 
Norway.  Torger  Balzerson  followed  the  occupation  of  a  sailor  and  a  pilot 
most  of  his  life.  After  a  life  of  activity  and  success  he  retired  to  his  farm 
at  Lund,  where  he  spent  his  last  days  with  his  children.  His  death  occurred 
in  1864.  Both  parents  were  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  Of 
the  family  reared  by  the  parents  of  Andrew  Lund;  Annie,  the  wife  of 
Alexander  Gjisness,  came  to  America  with  her  brother,  Andrew,  and  died 
in  1912,  in  Wisconsin;  Peter  lived  at  Lund,  Norway,  on  the  farm  left  by  his 
father  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  March,  191 5;  Martha,  the  widow 
of  Peter  Eide,  still  lives  in  Norway,  but  has  a  son  Peter  residing  in  Folden 
township,  and  a  son  Anton  who  is  living  in  Canada;  Maren,  the  widow  of 
Andrew  Thorstep,  lives  in  Helegeland,  Norway;  Thea.  the  widow  of  Ben- 
jamin Hanson  Lund,  resides  in  Lund,  Norway;  Ellen,  who  married  Helge 
Gundtedt,  a  teacher,  died  early  in  life,  leaving  a  son  Magne  who  is  at  the 
present  time  residing  in  Vining;  Andrew  is  the  father  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  and  Edward  T.  is  a  resident  of  Vining.  The  third  child.  Olava, 
married  Eric  Menzen  and  after  his  death  became  the  wife  of  Peter  Arnsson. 
She  is  buried  in  Norway. 

As  a  boy  Andrew  Lund  chose  a  life  on  the  sea,  and  at  the  age  of  seven- 
teen decided  to  cross  the  Atlantic  ocean.  After  landing  in  America  he  went 
(8b) 


114  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

to  Hudson,  Wisconsin,  where  he  was  occupied  in  the  winter  in  the  lumber 
business  and  in  the  spring  he  obtained  employment  on  the  St.  Croix  river. 
For  ten  years  he  worked  on  the  boat  line  and  during-  that  time  gained  many 
valuable  experiences  and  made  many  acquaintances  He  formed  a  very 
interesting  acquaintance  with  Senator  .Moses  E.   Clapp. 

in  the  spring  of  1868,  Andrew  T.  Lund  married  Annie  Amundson,  at 
Hudson.  In  the  spring  of  [879,  lie  and  his  wife  came  by  rail  to  Perham, 
Minnesota,  and  from  there  to  Xidaros  township  the}'  went  by  a  team  of 
oxen.  After  settling  in  Nidaros  township  they  began  the  task  of  home- 
steading  eighty  acres  of  land,  which  was  located  in  section  2.  The  farm, 
which  was  a  wilderness,  was  gradually  transformed  into  a  cultivated  tract 
of  land  under  the  management  of  Mr.  Lund.  After  a  short  period  of 
residence  on  the  farm  the  community  life  in  that  section  was  brightened 
by  the  fact  that  the  Northern  Pacific  railroad  would  cut  through  that  town- 
ship. In  1881,  the  building  of  the  road  was  completed  and  the  village  of 
Lund  sprung  up  (which  was  later  changed  to  Vining),  a  place  named  in 
honor  of  the  family  of  which  Charles  Lund  is  a  member.  To  the  village 
since  that  time,  have  been  drawn  other  lines  of  enterprise  until  now  in  its 
attractiveness  it  remains  a  worthy  monument  to  him  whose  name  it   honors. 

During  his  early  days  on  the  farm  Andrew  Lund  was  not  wholly 
occupied  with  its  duties,  he  found  time  to  enter  other  fields  of  work  and 
on  account  of  his  ability  was  readily  chosen  as  a  leader.  He  became  agent 
for  the  Andrews  &  Gage  Grain  Elevator  Company,  and  as  his  business  grew 
to  large  proportions,  Mr.  Lund  was  soon  able  to  lease  the  elevator,  and  when 
his  success  was  assured  he  bought  out  the  entire  plant.  Aside  from  this 
line  of  work  Mr.  Lund  was  also  engaged  in  the  general  mercantile  business. 
in  partnership  with  Ole  T.  Xyhus.  For  twenty  years  Mr.  Lund  held  the 
appointment  of  postmaster  and  executed  the  duties  of  that  office  in  an  effi- 
cient manner.  M  he  continued  to  succeed  in  various  lines  of  business  enter- 
prise. Mr.  Lund  from  time  to  time  added  to  his  land  possession-,  until  at  the 
time  of  his  death  he  was  owner  and  manager  of  two  thousand  acres  of 
land,  and  was  known  throughout  that  section  of  Minnesota  as  one  of  the 
largest  landowners  in  Otter  Tail  county. 

In  1004  Mr.  Lund  organized  and  placed  on  a  linn  basis  the  Hank  of 
Vining,  with  he  and  hi-  sons  as  stockholders.  In  [908  the  hank  was  incor- 
porated as  Lunds'  State  Bank,  with  Mr.  Lund  as  president,  an  office  he  held 
until  December  16,  [908,  when  his  death  occurred.  The  hank  had  a  capital 
stock  of  ten  thousand  dollars  and  a  very  handsome  surplus  at  the  time  of 
the  death  of  its  president.  In  the  affairs  of  education  Andrew  Lund  always 
expressed  a  deep  interest,  ami  was  often  called  upon  to  assist  in  school 
affairs      lie  served  as  trustee  of  Concordia  College,  at  Moorhead,  and  also 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  115 

was  trustee  of  St.  Luke's  hospital,  at  Fergus  Falls,  an  institution  he  helped 
to  organize.  As  a  Republican  he  was  honored  with  positions  of  high  stand- 
ing and  at  the  time  of  his  death  had  held  every  township  office.  He  was  at 
one  time  a  candidate  for  the  Republican  nomination  to  Congress  and  in 
the  convention  held  the  balance  of  power,  which  his  withdrawal  threw  to 
the  forces  of  Frank  M.  Eddy.  As  a  candidate  for  the  state  Senate  Mr. 
Lund  gave  another  exciting  race  and  during  his  life  gave  evidence  of  a 
deep  enthusiasm  for  Republican  party  and  its  cause. 

Andrew  Lund  was  able  to  enter  many  fields  of  endeavor  and  carry 
out  successfully  every  undertaking.  He  was  devout  in  religious  affairs  and 
through  his  efforts  the  United  Lutheran  church  at  Vining  was  erected  and 
placed  on  a  firm  foundation.  As  a  member  of  the  church  he  did  everything 
in  his  power  for  its  welfare.  He  donated  the  ground  for  its  location  and 
even  solicited  funds  for  the  erection  of  the  present  building.  Mr.  Lund 
was  president  of  the  Sons  of  Norway.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 

Andrew  T.  and  Annie  (Amundson)  Lund  were  the  parents  of  the  fol- 
lowing children :  Thea  became  the  wife  of  Rev.  J.  C.  Herre  and  is  living  in 
New  York  city;  Melvin  resides  in  Vining.  as  a  farmer  and  a  lumberman; 
Charles  is  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Oscar  is  a  merchant  in  Vining;  Harry 
A.  manages  the  homestead  farm;  Andrew  T.  is  president  of  the  bank  and 
is  in  the  real-estate  business;  Fmil  A.  resides  at  Vining;  Gundrun  married 
Thoe  Thoen,  of  Thoen  Brothers  clothing  store  at  Minneapolis,  and  Boletta, 
who  married  William  Huntington,  a  merchant,  lives  in  Paynesville,  Minne- 
sota.     Mrs.  Andrew  Lund  passed  away  on  the  3rd  of  July,   1904. 

Charles  A.  Lund  was  born  in  Hudson.  Wisconsin,  on  the  14th  of 
October,  1878.  His  early  education  was  received  in  the  public  schools  of 
Vining  and  after  completing  the  common-school  course,  he  attended  school 
at  Concordia  College,  from  which  institution  he  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1896.  His  education  was  completed  in  the  St.  Paul  College  of  Law.  from 
which  he  received  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  1904.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar 
but  after  a  short  time  returned  to  Vining  where  he  helped  his  father  organ- 
ize the  bank  of  which  institution  he  has  been  cashier  since  its  organization. 
The  business  of  the  bank  lias  steadily  increased  and  in  1913  a  new  brick 
building  was  erected,  containing  vaults  modeled  after  those  in  the  National 
Bank  of  Fergus  Falls.  The  bank'  at  the  present  time  has  over  one  hundred 
depositors.  Mr.  Lund  is  executor  of  his  father's  estate,  though  a  large  part 
of  it  was  divided  previous  to  his  death. 

The  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  near  the  village  of  Vining  occupies  a 
great  deal  of  the  attention  of  (  harles  Lund.  He  is  a  breeder  of  Shorthorn 
cattle  of  which  he  has   forty-six  head.     His  aim  is  to  rear  onlv  purebred 


Il6  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

stock.  In  19 1 2  Mr.  Lund  erected  a  modern  house  and  barn  and  has  two 
silos  on  the  place.     The  barn  was  destroyed  by  a  cyclone. 

Following  the  example  of  his  father,  Charles  Lund  has  remained  loyal 
to  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party.  He  is  president  of  the  village  of 
Vining.     He  is  a  member  of  the  United  Lutheran  church. 

On  the  30th  of  June,  1908,  Charles  A.  Lund  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Matilda  Westberg,  a  resident  of  Fergus  Falls,  and  the  daughter  of  August 
Westberg,  a  member  of  one  of  the  oldest  families  in  Otter  Tail  county. 
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  A.  Lund  the  following  children  have  been  born : 
Corrinne  Elizabeth,  who  was  born  on  October  18.  1909,  and  Wesley  Carlton. 
April  28,  1912,  and  died  on  June  30,  1914. 

Mr.  Lund  has  been  chairman  of  the  school  board,  succeeding  has  father 
in  1909.  He  has  the  honor  of  having  built  the  first  consolidated  school  in 
Otter  Tail  county,  which  is  a  step  in  advance  of  the  educational  system  in 
this  section.  For  a  distance  of  two  miles  around  the  school  site  children 
are  brought  each  day  to  the  up-to-date  building,  where  the  influence  is 
more  lasting  and  the  conditions  more  healthful  than  those  found  in  the  old- 
time  district  school  of  the  rural  community. 


CHRIS  EYTEN. 


In  1880  Mr.  Evjen  left  his  native  home  in  Norway  for  the  more 
attractive  advantages  of  the  United  States,  and  here  he  has  acquired  the 
reputation  of  being  one  of  the  most  prosperous  and  successful  merchants. 
At  Carlisle,  Minnesota,  where  he  carries  a  modern  stock  of  merchandise. 
his  reputation  for  straightforward  dealing  is  not  only  well  known  in  that 
vicinity,  but  has  reached  far  beyond  the  limits  of  the  community. 

Chris  Rvjen,  merchant,  of  Carlisle,  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  born  on  February  3,  1861,  at  Trondhjem,  Norway,  and  is  a  son  of 
Nels  and  Evjen  (Tngeburg")  Evjen.  His  education  was  obtained  at  the 
public  schools  of  Norway,  and  after  finishing  his  studies,  he  assisted  his 
father  on  the  farm  for  a  time,  leaving  Trondhjem.  Norway,  for  America 
on  April  14,  1880,  arriving  in  this  country  on  May  17.  He  first  worked  in 
Olmstead  county,  at  Rochester,  and  on  April  1.  t88i,  came  to  Carlisle  and 
was  emploved  on  a  farm  at  this  place  for  a  few  years.  In  1887  Mr.  Evjen 
began  farming  for  himself  on  a  rented  farm.  In  1800  he  bought  the  store 
which  he  now  owns  and  operates,  carrying  on  a  general  merchandise  busi- 
ness. On  March  [8,  [891,  Mr.  Evjen  was  appointed  postmaster  of  Carlisle, 
and  in  1005  was  made  agenl  for  the  Greal  Northern  railroad.  He  has 
been  a  large  Inner  of  -rain  from  the  lime  of  locating  at  Carlisle.  Politi- 
cally, he  has  always  been  an  independent  voter  in  both  local  and  state 
politics.     He  has  taken  an  active  interest  in  matters  of  local  interest,  serving 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  II7 

as  clerk  of  Carlisle  township  for  twenty-eight  years,  and  for  the  same  length 
of  time  served  as  constable. 

Nels  and  Evjen  (Ingeburg)  Evjen,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  were  born  in  Norway,  where  they  followed  farming  for  a  living. 
The  children  born  to  this  marriage  were:  Louisa,  Andrew,  Regina,  Rage- 
hild,  Chris,  Christian  and  John. 

Chris  Evjen  was  united  in  marriage,  May  27,  1887,  with  Johannah 
M.  Hexum,  daughter  of  Martin  Hexum,  to  which  union  the  following 
children  have  been  born:  Ida,  Carl.  Minnie,  Alta,  Otto  (deceased),  Otto 
II,  Elmer  (deceased),  Elmer  II  and  Mary. 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Evjen  hold  the  respect  and  admiration  of  a  large 
number  of  friends  and  acquaintances  at  Carlisle  and  the  surrounding  terri- 
tory, where  their  success  has  been  earned.  Mrs.  Evjen  has  been  school 
clerk  of  this  district  for  fourteen  years.  Mr.  Evjen  is  a  member  of  the 
Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  and  is  also  a  member  of  Lodge  No.  59, 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  at  Fergus  Falls.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Evjen  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 


OLE  T.  NYHUS. 


One  of  the  pioneers  among  the  merchants  of  Otter  Tail  county  is  Ole 
T.  Nyhus,  who,  in  the  early  days  of  the  town  of  Vining,  established  a  gen- 
eral merchandise  store  and  took  an  important  part  in  the  building  up  of 
business  interests  and  the  general  welfare  of  the  locality.  Mr.  Nyhus  has 
been  a  successful  storekeeper  through  a  period  of  many  years  and  a  man 
whose  citizenship  has  been  of  permanent  good  to  the  county  and  one  who 
today  is  prominent  in  the  public  affairs  of  the  town  and  vicinity. 

Ole  T.  Nyhus  was  born  at  Rengerike,  Norway,  on  August  22,  1859, 
the  son  of  Truls  and  Christi  (Knutsen)  Nyhus,  both  of  whom  were  born 
in  Norway,  where  the  mother  lived  until  her  death,  in  1885,  after  which 
the  father,  Truis  Nyhus,  in  [886,-came  u>  America  ami  joined  a  son.  Sivert, 
of  Henning  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  In  his  native  land  Truls  Nyhus 
was  a  small  fanner,  who  cultivated  well  his  limited  acreage.  To  Truls  and 
Christi  Nyhus  were  bom  the  following  children:  Knnt.  who  is  a  retired 
farmer  of  Henning  township;  OK-  T.,  tin  subject  of  this  sketch;  Sivert, 
who  lives  on  a  farm  in  Henning  township;  Even,  who  died  in  Norway,  in 
[885;  Inga,  who  married  Knut  Nyhus,  and  who  lives  near  Bemidji,  Minne- 
sota, and   Hans,  who  is  a   farmer  of  Leaf  Lake  township. 

ollowing  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Nor- 
way, worked  at  general  farm  duties  until  1881,  when  he  came  to  America 
ami  settled  at  Faribault,  Minnesota,  reaching  that  place  <>n  June  r6,  (88l 
During   the    spring   "f    [882    Mr.    Nyhus    came    to    Otter    Tail    county   and 


Il8  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

worked  on  the  farms  in  this  community  for  the  next  rive  years.  In  1887  he 
established  a  general  merchandise  store  in  Vining,  on  a  site  next  to  that 
which  he  now  occupies.  When  he  organized  his  business,  Ole  T.  Nyhus 
built  for  his  storeroom  a  rude  wooden  structure  which  served  until  the  year 
[898,  and  then  he  erected  a  brick-veneered  building,  in  size  twenty-six  by 
seventy-two  feet,  where  he  now  conducts  his  business  with  a  stock  valued 
at   from  ten  to  twelve  thousand  dollars. 

Ole  T.  Nyhus  established  his  business  in  partnership  with  Knut  Uggen, 
who,  in  the  year  1887,  sold  his  interest  to  A.  T.  Lund,  who  continued  in 
the  conduct  of  the  store  with  Ole  T.  Nyhus  until  the  year  1908,  when  Mr. 
Lund  died  and  his  son,  Oscar  Lund,  succeeded  his  father,  in  a  firm  under 
the  name  of  Nyhus  &  Lund.  This  company  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  the  entire 
county,  its  senior  member,  Mr.  Nyhus.  being  the  oldest  merchant  in  the 
town  of  Vining,  Minnesota.  The  firm  of  Nyhus  &  Lund  is  not  only  a 
thorough  success,  with  its  thriving  merchandise  business,  but  the  enterpris- 
ing proprietors  have  enlarged  the  scope  of  their  business  dealings  an.!  have 
added  a  real-estate  department  which  is  consummating  some  of  the  large 
deals  in  real  estate  of  the  locality.  In  addition  to  their  regular  stock,  this 
firm  has  acquired  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  in  Folden 
township. 

In  politics,  Ole  T.  Nyhus  is  a  Republican  and  as  a  member  of  this 
party  lie  has  been  elected  to  and  served  well  on  the  town  council,  and  also 
has  been  the  occupant  of  the  office  of  president  of  the  village  board.  Mr. 
Nyhus  is  a  leading  member  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  at  Vining 
and  he  is  affiliated  with  the  organization  of  the  Sons  of  Norway.  In  private 
life  Ole  T.  Nyhus  has  filled  his  place  competently  and  graciously  and  he  is 
recognized  as  one  of  the  strong  elements  in  the  active  life  of  Vining,  and  of 
Otter  Tail  county.     Ole  T.  Nyhus  has  never  married. 


ANTON  B.  TRANA. 


Without  the  opportunity  for  educational  advantages,  and  denied  special 
training  for  business.  Anton  I'..  Trana  was  able  to  apply  the  determined  and 
persevering  nature  of  the  native  Norwegian  and  rise  to  a  prominent  place 
in  the  public  life  of  his  community  and  to  win  the  respect  and  esteem  of  his 
fellow  citizens  and  associates.  The  life  of  \ntoti  I!.  Trana  is  representative 
of  a  type  which  has  done  much  for  Otter  Tail  county,  and  he  is  a  man 
whom  the  residents  delight  in  honoring. 

\nton  B.  Trana  was  born  near  Stenkjer,  Norway,  on  October  28, 
1874,  the  son  of  Rasmus  and  Johanna  Trana.  both  natives  of  Norway,  in 
which  land  they  lived  and  were  married.  In  [882  they  came  to  America 
.Mid  settled  in   Leaf  Mountain  township.   Otter  Tail  county,   where,  in   1883, 


OTTER    TAN.    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  IK) 

Rasmus  Trana,  took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  The 
land  was  covered  with  timber,  which  Rasmus  Trana  proceeded  to  clear, 
during  which  time  he  and  his  family  lived  in  a  "cellar,"  later  building  a 
substantial  house,  a  place  where  he  lived  until  his  death,  in  1893.  Johanna 
Trana  survived  her  husband  anil  lives  at  Henning,  she  now  being  seventy- 
seven  years  of  age  Rasmus  Trana  was  of  a  quiet  and  retiring  disposition, 
lie  was  a  member  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  a  congregation  with 
which  his  widow  now  worships.  To  Rasmus  and  Johanna  Trana  were  born 
the  following  children:  John  R.,  who  is  a  farmer  near  Plaza,  North 
Dakota:  Martin,  who  conducts  a  feed-mill  at  Almora.  Minnesota:  Johan.  a 
United  States  mail  rural  deliveryman  at  Henning,  Minnesota:  Albert,  who 
is  the  proprietor  of  a  restaurant  at  Almora:  Mary,  who  married  Iver  E. 
Johnson,  and  lives  at  Norman,  Washington;  Anton  B..  the  subject  of  this 
sketch:  Richard,  who  died  at  Missoula,  Montana,  in  1903;  and  Gina.  who 
married  O.  M.  Trana.  and  lives  at  Colfax,  North  Dakota. 

Anton  P..  Trana  received  hut  little  education  as  a  result  of  poor  edu- 
cational facilities  in  the  vicinity  of  his  childhood  home,  and  therefore  Mr. 
Trana  is  largely  a  self-taught  man.  During  his  life  Anton  P..  Trana  has 
engaged  in  various  lines  of  endeavor,  among  which  was  a  position  as  grain 
buyer  for  the  Andrews  Grain  Company,  of  .Minneapolis,  while  he  lived  at 
Vining,  Minnesota,  from  [905  to  [915,  when  he  was  made  the  agent  of  the 
Dower  Lumber  Company,  at  Vining,  a  line  of  work  in  which  he  is  yet  engaged. 
In  igoj  Anton  B.  Trana  established  a  confectioner)1  store  at  Vining,  a 
business  which  he  conducted  until  July.  [915,  when  he  disposed  of  his 
interest  in  this  husiness.  During  the  administration  of  President  Roosevelt, 
.Mr.  Trana  was  honored  by  his  appointment  to  the  office  of  postmaster  at 
Vining,  an  office  which  he  served  with  dignity  and  with  efficiency  for  eight 
years.     In  political  affiliation,  Anton  B.  Trana  is  a  Republican. 

(  )n  May  5,  11)03.  Anton  B.  Trana  was  married  to  Julia  Johnson,  who 
was  born  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  the  daughter  of  John  S.  Johnson 
and  wife,  who  were  early  settlers  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Mrs.  Julia  (John- 
son) Trana  died  on  January  29,  1012.  To  this  union  no  children  were 
born.  (In  June  10.  [914,  Mr.  Trana  was  married,  secondly,  to  Lydia  Pet- 
erson, who  was  born  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  the  daughter  of  Nels 
Peterson  and  wife.  Nels  Peterson  being  one  of  the  earliest  settlers  of  the 
community.  To  the  marriage  of  Anton  and  Lydia  (Peterson)  Trana  was 
born  one  sou,    Howard,  who  was  horn  on  June   13.   1015. 

\nton  B.  Trana  is  among  the  men  who  have  done  greal  things  for 
(liter  Tail  county  and  for  the  town  of  Vining,  a  man  who  has  the  con- 
fidence of  all  and  one  who.  with  his  wife,  occupies  a  conspicuous  place  in  the 
various  walks  0f  life  in  the  locality. 


120  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA. 

FR  \NK   FJESTAD. 

Among  the  prominent  citizens  of  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  and  one  of  its  most  successful  farmers,  is  Frank  Fjestad,  who 
was  horn  in  Norway,  November  12,  1847,  and  who  is  the  son  of  Erek 
Haug  and   Tore   P.    Field. 

Mr.  Fjestad's  parents  were  farmers  in  Norway  and  reared  a  family  of 
twelve  children.  They  spent  all  of  their  lives  in  their  native  land.  Frank 
Fjestad  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Norway  and  in  Jnne,  1867, 
came  to  America.  From  June  to  December,  1867,  Mr.  Fjestad  lived  in 
La  Crosse,  Wisconsin,  and  from  La  Crosse  he  emigrated  to  the  state  of 
Texas,  where  he  remained  a  year  and  one-half,  working  for  a  gardener. 
He  returned  to  La  Crosse  and  then  moved  to  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota, 
hut  remained  there  scarcely  a  week.  when,  in  1869,  he  moved  to  Carlisle 
township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  homesteading  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres,  the  farm  upon  which  he  now  lives.  The  land  was  a  barren 
waste  at  that  time  and  there  was  not  even  a  tree  standing  on  the  entire 
farm. 

Mr.  Fjestad  lias  erected  all  of  the  buildings  and  has  made  all  of  the 
improvements  upon  the  land,  as  well  as  planted  all  of  the  trees.  He  has 
done  most  of  the  improving  with  his  own  hands.  When  Mr.  Fjestad 
started  in  life  he  had  only  fifty  dollars,  one  cow  and  a  pair  of  steers.  Today 
he  owns  nine  hundred  and  ninety  acres  of  land,  all  of  which  is  well  improved. 
besides  many  thousand  dollars'  worth  of  personal  property.  Shortly  after 
he  settled  on  his  claim,  he  started  freighting  for  the  government  and  the 
first  year  hauled  freight  from  St.  Cloud  to  the  forts.  Later  he  hauled 
freight  from  Benson  and  was  employed  in  this  business  altogether  during  a 
period  of  three  years. 

Later,  Mr.  Fjestad  hauled  flour  from  Fergus  Falls  to  all  surrounding 
points,  including  Morehead.  Subsequently,  however,  lie  engaged  in  farm- 
ing, and  his  life  in  these  early  days  was  a  hard  struggle,  as  his  farm  was 
far  from  a  railroad.  Ii  was  thirty-five  miles  to  the  postoffice  and  sixt) 
miles  to  mill.  Nevertheless,  Mr.  Fjestad  prospered  from  year  to  year  and. 
as  the  years  wore  on.  gradually  accumulated  more  and  more  land  and 
added    t0    his    pi  iSS< 

In  1872  frank  Fjestad  was  married  to  Taaline  1'.  Spaberg,  who  was 
horn  on  May  5,  i'v'"5-  in  Norway,  To  them  have  been  horn  ten  children: 
Edward  l;..  who  was  horn  on  November  t8,  1  Ny .; :  Peter  F.,  ("let.  .her  22. 
[875;  Clara  I'.,  deceased,  December  t6,  1X77:  Theodore  1"..  January  5. 
in-.,,  died  in  infancy;  Thea  F.,  October  t8,  r88r ;  Ellen  F.,  deceased. 
October  8,  r 883 ;  Theodore  Ufred,  December  20,  [886;  fnga  Marie.  May 
17.   iSNm:  Lena.  May  26,   [893;  and  Oscar  Ferdinand,    December  5,    [895. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  121 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fjestad  and  all  of  the  members  of  their  family  are 
identified  with  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  in  Carlisle  township.  Mr. 
Fjestad  is  a  Republican  in  politics.  He  has  served  as  township  trustee  and 
has  been  treasurer  of  the  township  since  its  organization.  For  many  years 
he  was  a  school  director  and  is  now  treasurer  of  the  school  board.  He  is 
also  treasurer  of  the  Farmers  Elevator  Company  at  Carlisle. 

There  is  no  better-known  citizen  in  Carlisle  township  and,  in  fact,  in 
the  adjoining  townships  than  Frank  Fjestad.  No  man  has  taken  a  more 
prominent  part  in  public  affairs  than  he  and  no  man  is  more  capable  natur- 
ally of  aspirin"'  to  the  position  of  leadership  than  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 


HANS  O.  LARSON. 


Hans  (  ).  Larson,  who  is  conducting  a  successful  mercantile  business  at 
Battle  Lake.  Minnesota,  where  he  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  O.  C.  Nelson 
&  Company,  is  a  native  of  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  born  there  on 
September  g,   1869. 

Mr.  Larson  is  a  son  of  Ole  and  Catharine  (Hansen)  Larson,  natives 
of  Norway,  the  former  of  whom  was  born  on  January  13,  1841,  and  the 
latter  on  November  12,  1840.  Ole  Larson  and  family  emigrated  to  America 
in  1867,  settling-  first  in  Goodhue  county.  Minnesota,  and  in  1870  they 
removed  to  Otter  Tail  county,  taking  a  homestead  in  Clitherall  township. 
They  also  owned  forty  acres  of  land  in  Sverdrup  township.  They  were  the 
parents  of  three  children,  Hans  O.,  Lauris  and  Minnie,  the  last  named  being 
the  wife  of  Alfred  Okeson,  of  North  Dakota.  Ole  Larson  and  all  his  fam- 
ily are  devout  members  of  the  Free  Lutheran   church. 

f  Tans  O.  Larson  was  reared  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and 
received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  home  township.  He  lived 
on  his  father's'  homestead  farm  until  he  reached  the  age  of  eighteen  years, 
when  he  was  employed  as  a  clerk  by  Mr.  Ubertsen,  of  Rattle  Lake,  with 
whom  he  remained  for  sewn  years.  Lie  then  entered  the  employ  of  O.  C. 
Nelson,  and  after  eight  years  of  service  became  a  member  of  the  firm, 
which  was  organized   in   1007. 

Hans  O.  Larson  was  first  married,  in  [892,  to  Bertha  Andersen,  who 
was  born  in  Norway  in  1872,  the  daughter  of  Alfred  \.ndersen.  \fter  her 
mothers'  death,  in  Norway,  Bertha  Andersen  came  with  her  father  to  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota,  in  1X711.  and  located  in  Tordenskjold  township. 
Alfred  \ndersen  now  lives  in  North  Dakota.  Hans  O  Larson  and  his 
first  wife  were  the  parents  of  two  children.  Oliver  Alexander  and  I  eonard 
Morgan.  The  mother  of  these  children  died  in  1S00.  and  on  September  6, 
inii.  Mr.  I  arson  was  married  to  Martha  Sett,  who  was  born  in  Clitherall 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,   Minnesota,  a  daughter  of    Vndrew   and    Anne 


122  OTTER     TAIL    C'olXTY.     MINNESOTA. 

(Julius)  Scott,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Denmark,  who  emigrated 
to  America  and  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Mrs.  Martha  Larson's  mother 
died  in  1914,  while  her  father  still  lives  on  his  farm  in  Clitherall  township. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Larson  and  family  are  members  of  the  Free  Lutheran 
church,  and  take  an  active  interest  in  the  affairs  of  the  church.  Mr.  1 -ar- 
son has  served  three  years  as  a  member  of  the  town  council  at  Battle  Lake. 
He  is  a  Republican,  and  takes  considerable  interest  in  local  and  national 
political  affairs. 


JOHN  KILL. 


The  gentleman  whose  name  appears  above,  although  a  native  of  Wis- 
consin, is  of  Norwegian  lineage,  and  it  is  with  a  certain  degree  of  pleasure 
and  satisfaction  that  a  briefly  outlined  biographical  -ketch  is  here  presented 
for  perusal,  and  also  as  a  matter  of  future  reference  for  the  progeny  which 
he  leaves  behind. 

John  Kjer.  farmer,  of  Fergus  Falls,  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  wa.s  horn  on   August   28,    [864,   in    Portage  county,   Wiscons 

on  of  Goren  and  Martha  Kjer.  His  education  was  obtained  at  the 
hools  of  his  native  county,  a.fter  which  he  was  employed  with  his 
father  on  the  farm  until  twenty-one  years  of  age.  when  he  began  farming 
for  himself  on  the  place  which  he  still  owns  in  Carlisle  township,  where  he 
re  ided  until  [896,  when  he  moved  to  South  Dakota  and  took  up  a  home- 
stead of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  in  which  venture  he  was  fairly  suc- 
cessful. In  1909  Mr.  Kjer  sold  his  farm  in  South  Dakota  and  moved  back 
to  his  home  in  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail  count}',  which  he  has  improved 
with  substantial  buildings,  and  where  he  carries  on  general  farming  and 
stock  raising.  Politically,  he  has  always  given  his  supporl  to  the  Republi 
can  1  tarty,  but  has  never  -ought  public  office. 

Goren  and  Martha  Kjer,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this  -ketch,  were 
both  born  in  Norway,  where  Mr.  Kjer  as  a  young  man  was  a  day  laborer. 
coming  later  to  America  and  settling  in  Portage  county,  Wisconsin,  where 
he  took  up  a  homestead.  During  the  summer  before  the  Great  Northern 
railroad  was  built  through  Fergus  Falls,  be  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and 
bought  two  bundled  acres  in  Carlisle  town-hip.  to  which  he  afterward 
added  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  more,  where  be  -pent  the  remainder 
of  his  life  in  agricultural  pursuits.  Mr.  and  Mrs,  Kjer  were  the  parents  of 
nine  children.  Politically,  Goren  Kjer  was  a  Republican,  and  in  religion, 
he  belonged  to  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 

fohn  Kjer  was  united  in  marriage,  in  [898,  with  Mary  Arlandson.  by 
whom  he  has  bad  three  children:  Edward,  Tohn  and  Myrtle 


OTTER     t'AII.    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  12} 

Mr.  Kjer  is  a  man  of  upright  character,  and  his  splendid  farm,  which 
he  keeps  to  a  high  standard,  is  one  of  the  attractive  places  of  Carlisle  town- 
ship. 


NICOLAI  O.  FIELD. 


Xicolai  O.  Field,  a  well-known  citizen  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota, 
who  is  engaged  in  the  postal  service  at  Olympia,  Washington,  is  a  native  of 
Carlisle,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  was  born  on  October  22, 
1874. 

Mr.  Field  is  the  son  of  Ole  N.  and  Anne  (Thorpe)  Field,  and  the 
grandson  of  Nels  Fjeld,  as  the  name  was  spelled  in  Norway.  Ole  X. 
Field  emigrated  to  America  in  [868  and  immediately  thereafter  came  west 
to  Fillmore  county,  from  which  place,  in  1870,  he  moved  to  Carlisle,  Otter 
Tail  county.  Here  he  took  a  homestead  and  lived  until  his  death.  There 
were  three  children  in  the  family,  two  of  whom  are  living:  Peter  O.,  of 
Frazee,  Minnesota,  a  well-known  citizen,  merchant  and  mayor  of  the  city; 
and  Nicolai  <»..  who  is  clerk  in  the  postofhee  in  Olympia,  Washington. 

The  father  of  Peter  O.  and  Xicolai  O.  Field  died  in  1888,  and  Xicolai 
worked  at  anything  he  could  turn  his  hand  to  until  1903,  when  he  moved 
to  Olympia,  Washington,  where  he  is  now  engaged  as  a  clerk  in  the  post- 
office.     tie  began  in  the  postal  service  in  1906. 

By  his  marriage  to  Anna  Holman,  the  daughter  of  Mrs.  M.  Benson, 
of  Verndale,  .Minnesota,  Xicolai  O.  Field  has  one  daughter. 

Mr.  Field  is  a  member  of  the  Elks,  the  Foresters  of  America  and 
Woodmen  of  the  World.     He  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  church. 


HENRY  COLBJORXSEN. 

Henry  Colbjornsen.  well-known  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  of  St.  Olaf 
township.  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was  born  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  on 
November  8.  1868,  the  son  of  Colbjorn  and  Jennie  (Holverson)  Colbjorn 
sen,  who  were  natives  of  Norway,  where  they  lived  until  the  year  1864.  they 
at  that  time  emigrating  to  America  and  after  landing  at  New  York  City 
they  went  immediately  to  the  city  of  Chicago,  where  they  lived  for  aboul 
five  years  and  then  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  in  the  year  1X70.  locating 
on  a  farm  which  Colbjorn  Colbjornsen  secured  in  Clitherall  town-hip. 
Through  pioneer  days,  with  hardships  and  trials,  this  pioneer  citizen  and 
farmer  succeeded  in  those  things  which  he  attempted.  lie  sold  his  farm  in 
IQ13  and  moved  to  North  Dakota.  In  the  family  of  Colbjorn  and  Jennie 
Colbjornsen  were  ten  children. 


I_'4  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Henry  Colbjornsen  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of 
CHtherall  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  after  which  he  worked  on  the  farm 
of  his  father  until  the  year  1891,  when  he  purchased  his  present  farm  of 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
where  he  is  successfully  and  extensively  engaged  in  general  agricultural 
pursuits.  In  addition  to  his  farm  duties,  Henry  Colbjornsen  is  engaged  in 
the  operation  of  a  threshing  machine  throughout  the  township  and  vicinity. 

In  1890  Henry  Colbjornsen  was  married  to  Lena  Harness,  and  to  this 
marriage  have  been  born  two  children,  Louisa  and  Effie. 

Politically,  Mr.  Colbjornsen  is  affiliated  with  the  Republican  party,  and 
while  he  has  not  taken  any  especial  part  in  the  political  or  official  life  of  the 
community,  he  is  a  citizen  who  is  valued  for  his  part  and  his  efforts  in  the 
ranks  of  private  citizenship  and  for  his  interest  in  the  promotion  of  the 
general  welfare  of  the  community  where  he  lives. 


S.  A.  SWANSON. 


One  of  the  leading  druggists  of  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  and 
one  of  its  best-known  citizens,  is  S.  A.  Swanson,  a  native  of  Fergus  Falls, 
where  he  was  born  on  July  19,  1873. 

S.  A.  Swanson  is  the  son  of  John  and  Selma  (Jensen)  Swanson,  who 
were  natives  of  the  province  of  Swalland,  Sweden,  and  who  came  to 
America  in  1870.  Subsequently,  John  Swanson.  arrived  at  Benson,  Minne- 
sota, which  was  then  the  terminal  of  the  Great  Northern  railway,  and  from 
there  walked  to  Fergus  Falls,  which  was  at  that  time  a  straggling  village, 
containing  only  a  few  people  who  lived  in  log  shanties.  Upon  arriving  in 
Fergus  Falls,  John  Swanson  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of 
land  in  Western  township,  which  he  cleared  and  upon  which  he  erected 
buildings.  Very  soon  after  coming  to  the  county  Mr.  Swanson  was  mar- 
ried and  lived  on  the  homestead  farm  for  eight  or  nine  years,  after  which 
he  moved  to  Amor  township  and  obtained  possession  of  three  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  of  land,  which  lie  proceeded  to  clear  and  improve.  After  living 
upon  the  farm  until  [914  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  and  retired,  but  -till 
owns  the  Amor  township  land,  lie  was  a  general  farmer  and  stockman 
during  Ins  active  career  and  served  in  many  township  offices,  lie  is  a  stanch 
can.  John  Swanson  :i\<<\  wife  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church 
,vas  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Amor  congregation, 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  fohn  Swanson  are  the  parents  of  six  children,  three 
son-  and  three  daughters,  of  whom  S.  A.  is  the  eldest;  Carl  is  a  painter  and 
paper-hanger  of  Fergus  balls:  Oscar  i-  station  agent  at  Detroit.  Minnesota: 
Lvdia,    who   married    Will    Ekman,    lives   on    the    farm    in    Amor    township; 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I  25 

Huldali  is  a  stenographer  in  the  court  house  at  Fergus  Falls;  and  Olga  is  a 
stenographer  in  the  county  auditor's  office  at  Fergus  Falls. 

Educated  in  the  puhlic  schools  of  Amor  township  and  in  the  academy 
at  Minneapolis,  S.  A.  Swanson  came  to  Battle  Lake,  Minnesota,  in  1891 
and  was  employed  by  Dr.  M.  S.  Jones  in  his  drug  store  for  four  or  five 
years.  Afterward  he  attended  the  Minneopolis  Institute  of  Pharmacy  and 
was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1900.  Upon  completing  his  pharmaceutical 
education,  he  worked  for  Doctor  Jones  until  1914,  when  he  purchased  the 
drug  store,  which  is  the  only  drug  store  in  Battle  Lake.  Naturally,  Mr. 
Swanson  has  a  large  and  growing  patronage  and  business.  The  stock  would 
invoice  at  the  present  time  at  about  forty-five  hundred  dollars. 

In  1904  S.  A.  Swanson  was  married  to  Huldah  Lindquist,  a  native  of 
Vasa,  which  is  situated  near  Red  Wing,  Minnesota.  Mrs.  Swanson  is  the 
daughter  of  N.  I'.  Lindquist.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Swanson  has  been  born 
one  son,   Robert,  who  was  born  on  December  5,  1906. 

S.  A.  Swanson  has  long  been  prominent  in  the  fraternal  circles  of  this 
county.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the 
Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the  United  Order  of  Workmen.  Mr. 
Swanson  votes  the  Republican  ticket,  but  has  never  taken  a  special  part  in 
politics. 


ALBERT  G.  WHITSON. 


Yumbered  among  those  who  have  stood  representative  of  marked  pro- 
gressiveness  and  civic  loyalty  in  Fergus  balls  and  who  have  contributed  a 
large  share  to  the  industrial  and  civic  advancement  of  the  community  is 
Albert  Whitson,  who  is  one  of  the  prominent  business  men  in  that  section 
of  Minnesota  in  which  he  lives.  In  his  chosen  field  of  endeavor  he  has 
accomplished  most  valuable  results  through  his  earnest  and  well-directed 
business  policies.  A  man  of  recognized  ability  and  judgment,  he  is  regarded 
as  an  authority  on  questions  of  civic  importance,  and  as  a  consequence  of 
his  admirable  traits  of  character  has  reached  a  position  of  distinction  in  his 
chosen  field  of  industry. 

Albert  G.  Whitson  was  born  near  Smith  Falls,  Canada,  on  April  18, 
1867,  and  is  a  sOn  of  John  and  Jane  (Lawson)  Whitson,  representatives  of 
an  honored  family,  known  in  Minnesota  for  almosl  fifty  years.  His  father 
was  a  fanner  and  miller  by  vocation  and  the  family  were  in  modest  financial 
circumstances  during  tin-  early  years  of  tin-  subject  of  this  sketch.  The 
parents  left  Canada  in  [868  ami  moved  to  Granville  Mills,  M 
where  the  father  engaged  in  the  milling  business  for  ten  years.  The  family 
then  moved  to  Owatonna,  Minnesota,  where  Mr.  Whitson  returned  to  the 
occupation  of  farming,  until  the  year   1884.      In  the  spring  of  that    war  he 


120  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

came  to  Otter  Tail  count)  and  settled  in  Aastad,  six  miles  from  Fergus 
Falls.  Shortly  after  his  arrival  in  that  township  John  Whitson  was  made 
foreman  of  the  waterworks,  which  was  in  the  course  of  building  at  that 
time. 

As  a  boy  Albert  Whitson  received  his  educational  advantages  in  the 
schools  of  Northfield  and  Owatonna.  The  career  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch  has  been  oik-  of  various  occupations,  the  first  of  which  was  railroad- 
ing. Later  he  engaged  in  fanning  in  (  (rwdl  and  the  wide  experience  gained 
in  these  two  fields  proved  to  be  extremely  valuable  to  him  later  in  life.  In 
1004  lie  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  and  engaged  in  the  livery  business.  Later 
he  was  associated  with  a  Mr.  Elliot,  and  took  over  the  control  of  the  ice 
plant   on    Stanton    avenue.      They    ;old   out    to  John    W.    Campbell   in   July, 

K)I-. 

The  business  of  Elliott  &  Whitson  was  opened  in  the  same  year,  when 
they  bought  out  F.  II.  Gary,  dealer  in  coal,  lime  and  cement.  Since  that 
time  the  firm  of  Elliott  &  Whitson  has  been  doing  an  unusually  successful 
business.  In  his  chosen  field  of  work.  Mr.  Whitson  has  made  a  large  circle 
of  friends,  bis  ability  and  thorough  business  methods  have  won  for  him  a 
place  of  distinction. 

The  marriage  of  Albert  Whitson  to  Mary  Elliott,  the  daughter  of  John 
Elliott,  was  solemnized  on  January  9,  iSqo.  They  are  the  parents  of  the 
following  children:  Elsie  and  Emilie,  who  are  teaching  school  at  Western; 
George  and  Sidney,  who  are  at  home  with  their  parents.  In  fraternal 
affairs  Mr.  Whitson  has  always  taken  an  active  interest.  Tie  is  a  member  of 
the  Odd  Fellows  lodge  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  In  his 
political  relations  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Republican  party. 


PETER  LEIN. 


One  who  has  made  a  record  of  large  and  numerous  accomplishment  in 
connection  with  the  practical  affairs  of  life  is  Peter  Lein,  who  is  recognized 
as  one  of  the  most  enterprising,  resourceful  and  influential  business  men  of 
his  community.  I  lis  life  has  been  such  as  to  entitle  him  to  a  place  of  dis- 
tinction and  unqualified  public  esteem.  Through  his  own  ability  and  efforts 
he  has  won  success  and  has  given  his  share  to  community  development  and 
prosperity. 

Peter  Lein  was  born  in  1S56,  in  Trondhjem,  Norway,  and  is  the  son 
ii  Peter  and  Barrel  (Peterson)  Lein.  both  of  whom  are  deceased  Bis 
father  died  in  1005  and  her  mother  in  iNoj.  When  the  subject  of  this 
sketch  was  just  twenty-four  years  old  he  came  to  America,  in  .March.  t88o. 
He  landed  at  Halifax  and  went  by  train  to  Montreal,  w  beta'  he  remained  a 
month.     From  there  he  went  to  Winnipeg,  where  he  was  employed  for  two 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  \  2J 

years  by  a  railroad  company  during  its  period  of  construction.  His  busi 
ness  career  was  initiated  in  [882,  when  he  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and.  with 
his  brother,  operated  a  butcher  shop  for  a  year.  I  lis  next  held  of  business 
activity  was  in  the  grocery  store  owned  by  Xels  Elden,  where  for  live  Near- 
he  was  employed  as  an  assistant.  During  his  engagement  in  business  there 
he  was  married  to  .Mary  Ann  Sten,  a  native  of  Norway,  and  a  woman  of 
much  persona]  charm. 

In  the  fall  of  1888  Air.  Lein  began  an  independent  career  as  manager 
of  the  grocery  which  he  now  owns.  A  man  of  distinctive  initiative  and 
progressive  ideas,  he  is  a  valued  member  of  the  community  in  which  he 
lives,  lie  is  extremely  popular  with  all  of  his  customers,  whom  he  endea- 
vors to  please  to  the  best  of  his  ability.  His  diligence  in  business  is  equaled 
only  by  his  devotion  to  Ins  family,  which  includes  his  wife  and  four  children. 
His  eldest  son,  Bennie,  is  assistant  cashier  of  the  Scandia  Bank.  The  other 
children  are  Emil,  who  is  married  and  living  in  Minneapolis;  Conrad,  a 
graduate  of  the  Naval  Academy  at    Annapolis,  and  Laura. 

Aside  from  his  business  interests.  Mr.  Lein  has  always  been  interested 
ii!  societies  that  promote  good  fellowship.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of 
Norway  and  of  the  Odd  Fellows. 


FRANK  H.  STRAUB. 


One  of  the  substantia]  business  men  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  the 
proprietor  of  a  popular  jewelry  store  of  this  city  and  a  man  who  is  inter- 
ested in  everything  which,  in  any  way,  mighl  promote  the  best  interests  of 
his  home  city,  is  Frank  H.  Straub. 

Frank  II.  Straub  was  born  in  1857  at  Lockport,  Michigan,  'a  town 
which  I-  now  called  Three  Rivers.  I  lis  parents  were  William  and  Harriet 
(Shomaker)  Straub,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  carriage  maker  by  trade. 
but  who,  during  the  greater  part  of  his  life,  was  engaged  in  the  mercantile 
business.  The  family  emigrated  to  Minnesota  in  1863  and  located  at  Win- 
nebago, an  Indian  agency  near  Waseca.  In  18(15.  two  wars  later,  the 
family  moved  to  Morristown,  in  Rice  county,  where  the  father  engaged 
in  carriage  making.  Three  years  later  the  family  moved  to  Faribault, 
Minnesota,  and  there  Mr.  Straub  embarked  in  the  mercantile  business,  after 
which  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  and  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business. 
He  died  in  this  city  in  [886.  His  wife  survived  him  many  years,  passing 
away  in   1010. 

Frank  IT  Straub  obtained  his  earh  education  at  Faribault.  Minnesota, 
and  grew  to  manhood  in  this  state.  When  he  was  old  enough  he  clerked 
in  a  jewelr)  store  and  later  operated  a  store  in  Northfield  for  Hunter  & 
Son.  ' 


128  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

In  1S80  Mr.  Straub  moved  to  Groton,  South  Dakota,  where  he  home- 
steaded  a  tract  of  land,  which  he  commuted  in  1882.  In  the  fall  of  the  same 
year  he  came  to  Fergus  Kails  and,  in  partnership  with  a  Mr.  Hunt,  engaged 
in  the  jewelry  business.  Six  years  later  Mr.  Straub  bought  Mr.  Hunt's 
interest  and  has  since  conducted  the  business  alone. 

By  his  marriage  to  Katie  A.  Ionian,  a  native  of  Maine  and  a  descend- 
ant of  the  Jordans  who  came  over  to  America  from  England,  Frank  H. 
Straub  has  six  children,  Katherine,  who  was  horn  in  Fergus  Falls,  Minne- 
sota, in  1892,  and  died  at  the  age  of  five  and  one-half  years;  Francis,  1894, 
and  died  February  1.  18117;  Winnifred,  November,  1897:  Lloyd  J.,  1899; 
Margaret  L.,  July.   1001  :  and  William  F.,  1004. 

Frank  II.  Straub  was  a  prominent  and  useful  member  of  the  city 
council  at  the  time  when  the  last  city  charter  was  adopted.  At  the  present 
time  he  is  one  of  the  water  and  light  commissioners  of  Fergus  Falls.  Mr. 
Straub  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the 
Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America 
and  the  Knights  of  Pythias. 


REV.  TAMES  MOODY 


The  Rev.  James  Moody,  professor  in  charge  of  Northwestern  (  ollege 
and  pastor  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church  at  Fergus  Falls,  this  county,  is 
a  man  who  has  attained  notable  distinction  in  educational  and  ministerial 
work.  He  is  one  of  the  most  distinguished  educators  now  residing  in  Otter 
Tail  county  and  his  character,  one  of  signal  exaltation  and  purity  of  pur- 
pose, is  widely  admired  by  the  people  of  this  count)-. 

Born  in  Kekvatten.  Vermland,  Sweden,  the  Rev.  Mr.  Moody  is  the  son 
of  Peter  and  [ngeborg  1  Anderson)  Moody,  who  with  their  family  emigrated 
to  America  in  [864,  proceeding  to  Ft.  Snelling.  by  the  way  of  Quebec.  Can- 
ada. From  Ft.  Snelling  the  family  removed  to  Carver  county,  where  they 
rented  a  farm  and  remained  until  after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War.  after 
which  they  removed  to  Moores  Prairie,  now  Cokato,  and  homesteaded  land. 
There  the  father  built  a  log  house  and  was  engaged  in  farming  until  his 
death  in   1904. 

James  Mood)  received  his  early  schooling  in  the  district  schools  of 
this  state  and  at  the  Swedish-American  College  al  St.  Peter.  He  was  a 
student  at  the  latter  institution  for  three  years  and  then  spent  sjN  years  al 
Seminary,  Rock  island,  Illinois.  \fter 
his  ordination,  the  Rev.  Mr  Mood)  received  his  first  charge  at  Crookston 
and  St.  Hilaire,  where  he  remained  for  eight  years  From  Crookston  and 
St,  Hilaire  he  was  transferred  to  Battle  I  ake.  in  Otter  Tail  county,  where 
he  remained  for  ten  vears.      In   [906  the  Ri -\     fames  Mtoodv  was  transferred 


IV.   JAMES    MOODY. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  129 

to  Fergus  Falls,  as  professor  in  charge  of  Northwestern  College  and  as 
pastor  of  the  Swedish  Evangelical  Lutheran  church,  over  which  he  is  still 
presiding  pastor.  His  influence  in  Fergus  Falls  and  vicinity  has  been  a 
large  factor  in  the  spiritual  and  moral  awakening  of  the  community,  his 
personality  and  kindly  Christian  leadership  proving  a  most  wholesome  fac- 
tor here  among  the  people  with  whom  he  has  labored. 

The  Reverend  Mr.  Moody  married  Augusta  W.  Johnson,  who  has  borne 
him  live  children,  James  R.,  Huldah  V.,  Ruth  A.,  Edna  A.,  and  Mildred 
T.  The  Moody  family  are  popular  in  the  social  life  of  Fergus  Falls  and 
are  a  credit  to  their  worthy  parents,  who  have  reared  them  in  the  love  of  the 
Christian  religion  and  in  the  principles  of  righteous  and  noble  living. 


C.  MURRY  HUNT. 


One  of  the  prosperous  and  long-standing  industries  of  Fergus  Falls, 
Minnesota,  is  the  cigar  manufacturing  business  operated  under  the  name  of 
Hunt  Brothers,  which  is  owned  by  C.  Murry  Hunt. 

C.  Murry  Hunt  was  born  on  July  II,  1868,  at  Manchester,  Iowa,  and 
is  the  son  of  Walter  G.  and  Susan  E.  (Blood)  Hunt.  The  former  was  the 
.son  of  David  Hunt,  who  was  horn  near  Buffalo,  New  York.  Walter  G. 
Hunt  was  born  on  August  8.  1843,  m  Harmony.  Chautauqua  county,  New 
York.  When  the  Civil  War  began  he  was  living  in  Delavan,  Wisconsin. 
He  enlisted  on  August  12,  1862,  in  Company  D,  Twenty-second  Regiment, 
Wisconsin  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  saw  active  service  during  the  war.  He 
was  honorably  discharged  on  June  28,  1865,  at  Milwaukee.  In  September, 
1865,  he  removed  to  Manchester,  Iowa,  wdiere  he  worked  as  a  farmer  and 
where  he  was  married  to  Susan  E.  Blood.  To  this  happy  marriage  there 
wen   born  three  children,  Clarence  M.,  Frank  L.  and  Elizabeth. 

The  family  removed  to  Nora  Springs,  Iowa,  and  in  the  spring  of  1879 
emigrated  to  Fergus  halls.  Minnesota.  In  the  spring  of  1879  they  took  a 
homestead  in  Star  Lake  township,  and  lived  there  for  three  years,  when 
they  returned  to  Fergus  Falls,  where  they  still  live. 

When  he  was  sixteen  years  old,  C.  Murry  Hunt  began  life  on  his  own 
responsibility.  For  a  few  years  he  was  employed  at  various  kinds  of 
work,  anything  which  he  could  find  to  do.  Subsequently  he  learned  the 
cigarmaker's  trade  from  Alexander  Van  Praag.  and  was  employed  by  Mr. 
Van  Praag  for  a  period  of  ten  years.  In  December,  1892,  Mr.  Hunt 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  cigars  on  his  own  account  under  the  name  of 
Hunt  Brothers.  The  name  is  still  in  use.  although  C.  M.  Hunt  owns  the 
business. 

Mr.  Mum  manufactures  several  brands  of  cigars,  among  which  are  the 
(9b) 


I30  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;    MINNESOTA. 

"Hunt  Imperial,"  "Hunt  Imperial,  Jr.,"  "Hunt's  Commander,'-  "Hunt's 
Havana  Special,"  "Ralph  Emerson,"  "Fergus,  Jr.,"  "Factory  Smoker,"  and 
"662."  The  Hunt  factory  is  an  attractive  building  constructed  of  brick  and 
situated  on  Lincoln  avenue,  west.  Air.  Hunt  employs  thirty-five  men.  His 
trade  is  confined  mostly  to  Minnesota.  North  and  South  Dakota. 

Some  years  ago  C.  Murry  Hunt  was  married  to  Etta  M.  Broun,  a 
native  of  Illinois,  by  whom  he  has  had  one  son,  Clarence  L.,  born  on 
October  7,  1893.     Clarence  L.  Hunt  is  employed  in  his  father's  office. 

Mr.  Hunt  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the 
Modem  Woodmen  of  America,  the  Knights  of  Maccabees,  Knights  of 
Pythias,  the  Modern  Samaritans,  and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Flks. 


J.  V.  MATTHEWS. 


J.  V.  Matthews,  a  successful  business  man  and  a  highly-respected  citi- 
zen of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  who  is  engaged  in  the  livery  business  and 
who  operates  a  feed  and  sale  stable  in  this  city,  is  a  native  of  the  town  of 
McHenry,  in  McHenry  county.  Illinois,  where  he  was  born  in  1856. 

Mr.  Matthews  is  the  son  of  John  Warren  and  Mary  (Scanlan)  Mat- 
thews, the  former  of  whom  was  born  in  Xew  York  state  and  the  latter  was 
born  in  Canada.  In  [857  the  family  emigrated  to  Lake  City,  Minnesota, 
making  the  latter  part  of  the  journey  up  the  Mississippi  river  in  the  steamer 
'"Milwaukee.*'  J.  V.  Matthews  remembers  distinctly  the  boat  as  she  plied 
up  and  down  the  river,  it  being  identified  at  that  time  by  two  large  gilt 
globes  between  her  smokestacks.  In  Lake  City.  Minnesota,  Mr.  Matthews' 
father  was  engaged  in  the  livery  and  sales  business  in  the  days  before  the 
railroads,  and  also  operated  a  mail  stage  line  between  Winona  and  Red 
Wing. 

Mr.  Matthew^,  when  a  mere  lad,  attended  tin-  first  school  established  in 
Lake  City,  Minnesota.  The  school  eventually  became  a  normal  school. 
After  growing  to  manhood,  Mr.  Matthews  learned  the  barber's  trade,  which 
he  followed  for  thirt)  years,  working  in  Winnebago  City,  Blue  Earth  and 
Devil's  Like.  North  Dakota.  In  May.  [883,  he  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and 
engaged  in  the  barber  business,  which  he  followed  until  1005.  when  lie 
purchased  the  livery  business  owned  1>\    George  (i.    Matthews,  his  brother. 

I.  V.  Matthews  was  married  to  Mary  R.  Smith,  the  daughter  of  John 
and   Mar)    Smith.      They  have  no  children. 

Mr.  Matthews  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Modem  Woodmen 
of  America,  and  tin-  Benevolenl  and   Protective  Order  of  Elks. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  [3I 

OLE  M.  HEXUM. 

The  subject  of  this  biographical  sketch  is  descended  from  a  fine  old 
family  of  Norway,  and  his  parents  came  to  America  many  years  ago.  Mr. 
Hexum  stands  out  prominently  as  one  of  the  rising  farmers  in  his  locality, 
where  he  has  demonstrated  strong  individuality  and  ability  in  his  chosen 
vocation. 

Ole  M.  Hexum,  farmer,  of  Carlisle,  Otter  Tail  county,  was  born  on 
September  18,  1876.  on  the  old  homestead  in  Carlisle  township,  and  is  a  son 
of  Martin  H.  Hexum  and  his  wife,  Marit  (Grafts)  Hexum.  His  education 
was  obtained  at  the  public  schools  of  Otter  Tail  county,  after  which  he  was 
trained  along  agricultural  lines  under  his  father's  instruction.  He  has 
farmed  on  the  home  place  since  iqoi,  doing  general  farming. 

A  biographical  sketch  of  Martin.  H.  Hexum  is  presented  elsewhere  in 
this  volume. 

Ole  M.  Hexum  was  united  in  marriage,  first,  with  Clara  Ejestad,  who 
was  born  on  December  16.  1877,  and  died  on  July  28,  1904,  and  by  whom 
he  had  two  children,  Morris  F.  and  Thoralf  M.  Mr.  Hexum  was  married, 
secondly,  to  Matilda  Firmer,  who  was  born  on  January  25,  1886.  which 
union  has  been  blest  with  the  following  children :     Myrtle.  Olga  and  Martin. 

Mr.  Hexum  has  won  an  enviable  popularity  as  one  of  the  younger 
agriculturists  of  Carlisle  township,  where  he  takes  an  active  part  in  the 
affairs  of  the  community,  doing  his  part  in  advancing  the  interests  of  the 
public.  He  is  a  man  of  sterling  qualities,  practicing  the  principles  of 
scrupulous  honesty  in  all  his  business  dealings. 


GEORGE  CAMPBELL. 


The  people  of  Fergus  Falls.  Minnesota,  consume  annually  a  great  deal 
■  if  ice  cream,  most  of  which  is  made  by  the  Campbell  firm,  who  not  only 
manufacture  ice  cream,  but  also  soft  drinks,  under  the  linn  name  of  the 
Fergus   Ice  Cream  Company. 

George  Campbell,  who,  with  his  father,  Alexander  Campbell,  is  engaged 
in  the  manufacture  of  ice  cream  and  soft  drinks  at  Fergus  Falls,  was  born 
in  Saratoga  township.  Winona  county.  Minnesota,  in  1872.  He  is  the  son 
of  Alexander  and  Mary  (Coulter)  Campbell,  the  former  of  whom  was  a 
farmer  for  main'  years,  but  is  now  in  partnership  with  his  son  in  Fergus 
Falls. 

After  having  remained  on  the  home  farm  until  he  was  twenty-seven 
years  old,  George  Campbell  moved  to  Mcnahga.  about  six  miles  from 
Wadena,  and  was  engaged  there  in  farming  for  about  si\  years.  Subse- 
quently, however,  he  moved  to  Wadena  and  remained  fur  eighteen 


I32  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

coming'  finally  to  Fergus  Falls  in  1909.  Immediately  thereafter  Mr.  Camp- 
bell engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  ice  cream,  to  which  he  has  added  milk, 
cream  and  butter,  and  supplies  most  of  the  grocers  of  Fergus  Falls  daily. 
He  also  has  a  large  trade  outside  of  Fergus  Falls.  Mr.  Campbell  has  a 
model  plant  and  has  built  up  a  nice  business  for  the  short  time  during 
which  he  has  been  located  in  this  county.  On  account  of  his  personality 
and  the  superiority  of  his  products,  his  business  is  growing  day  by  day  and 
month  by  month. 

Mr.  Campbell's  wife,  before  her  marriage,  was  Gertrude  I.  Bradt, 
who  was  born  in  Fremont  township,  Winona  county,  Minnesota.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.   Campbell  have  one  son,  Lawrence,   who  was  born  on   May   I,    1901. 

George  Campbell  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  highly 
respected  by  the  people  of  Fergus  Falls  and  vicinity. 


TUSTUS  PICKIT. 


Among  the  well-known  merchants  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  and 
among  the  pioneer  citizens  who  belong  to  a  past  generation,  was  the  late 
Justus  Pickit,  a  prominent  citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county  for  forty  years,  who 
died  on  June  7,  1913. 

The  late  Justus  Pickit  was  born  in  Edwards,  New  York,  on  July  2, 
1837,  and  spent  his  boyhood  and  early  manhood  in  the  Empire  state.  When 
the  Civil  War  broke  out  he  enlisted  in  the  Ninety-second  Regiment.  New 
York  Volunteer  Infantry.  After  the  war.  in  1869,  he  came  west  to  St. 
Cloud,  Minnesota,  where  he  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  in  partner- 
ship with  J.  B.  Abbott. 

In  1871  Mr.  Pickit  came  to  Fergus  Falls.  Minnesota,  and  erected  a 
frame  building  on  the  present  site  of  the  Scandia  Land  Company,  at  the 
corner  of  Lincoln  and  Mill  streets,  where  be  had  a  general  mercantile  store. 

Mr.  Pickit  served  as  postmaster  of  Fergus  Falls  for  four  years  under 
the  administration  of  t lie  late  President  Harrison,  and  during  his  advancing 
years  was  retired  from  business.  He  lived  quietly  in  the  later  years  of  his 
life.  He  took  a  prominent  part  in  the  progress  and  development  of  Fergus 
Falls  and  was  very  successful  as  a  business  man.  especially  as  a  merchant. 

Bv  his  marriage,  in  Herman,  New  York,  to  \im  1  M.  Peek,  a  native 
of  Fowler,  New  York,  the  .laughter  of  Daniel  and  Martha  (Fuller)  Peck. 
there  were  horn  four  sons;  Horace  E.,  who  lives  in  Fergus  Falls;  Leslie 
J".,  who  lives  in  Los  Vngeles,  California,  who  married  Efne  Straub;  Robert 
C.,  who  is  employed  in  the  auditor's  office  at  St.  Paul,  and  Ralph  E.,  of 
Los  Angeles,  California.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leslie  J.  Pickit  have  four  children. 
1  '.    married    Mamie    Snyder,    and    they   have   an    adopted    daughter, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 33 

Gertrude.  Ralph  E.  married  Carrie  Cotterell,  and  they  have  no  children. 
Mrs.  Justus  Pickit's  father  was  for  many  years  connected  with  the  Fuller- 
ville  Iron  Works,  at  Fullerville,  New  York. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pickit  reared  a  family  of  splendid  children,  who  in  the 
various  communities  where  they  live  are  leading  honorable  and  useful  lives 
and  who  are  a  credit  not  only  to  their  parents,  but  to  the  community  where 
they  spent  the  earliest  years  of  their  lives. 


A.  M.  ANDERSON. 


Jt  is  a  difficult  task  to  do  justice  to  any  individual  within  the  limited 
space  accorded  in  a  volume  of  this  character,  where  so  many  must  be 
given  the  credit  which  they  have  honestly  and  deservedly  earned.  To  Mr. 
Anderson,  however,  especial  honor  is  due  because  of  the  struggle  through 
many  hardships  through  which  he  has  passed,  and  the  eminent  financial 
success  which  he  has  achieved,  thus  enabling  him  to  pass  the  remaining 
years  of  his  life  in  comfort. 

A.  M.  Anderson,  farmer,  Fergus  Falls,  Carlisle  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  was  born  on  January  8,  1856,  in  Norway,  and  is  a  son  of  Michael 
and  Julia  (Olson) .  Anderson.  He  came  with  his  parents  to  America  in 
1 86 1,  locating  in  Allamakee  county.  Iowa.  His  opportunities  for  receiving 
an  education  were  limited,  attending  for  a  short  period  at  the  public  schools 
in  Iowa,  and  about  the  same  length  of  time  in  Minnesota.  As  a  young  man 
ii  was  always  necessary  for  him  to  work  very  hard,  and  in  1885  he  began 
farming  for  himself  on  his  father's  farm  in  Martin  county,  Minnesota, 
which  he  afterward  bought,  and  which  he  sold  in  1902,  coming  to  Carlisle 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  bought  a  tract  of  two  hundred  and 
eighty  acres,  eighty  of  which  he  sold  in  1913,  and  now  owns  two  hundred 
acres,  on  which  he  has  put  all  the  buildings  and  other  improvements.  In 
addition  to  following  general  farming,  Mr.  Anderson  conducts  a  dairy, 
and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Fergus  Falls  Creamery.  Politically,  he  is  a 
strong  Democrat,  while  his  religious  views  are  in  accordance  with  those  of 
the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  in  which  he  takes  a  deep  interest.  He  has 
put  out  a  new  orchard,  and  is  considered  a  progressive  farmer. 

Michael  and  Julia  (Olson1)  Anderson,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  were  both  born  in  Norway,  the  former  coming  to  America  as  a  day 
laborer,  arriving  at  New  York  City  in  1861,  and  going  from  there  to 
Allamakee  county.  Iowa,  where  he  bought  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  and  lived 
until  1882,  when  he  moved  to  Martin  county.  Minnesota,  taking  a  home- 
stead of  eighty  acres,  where  his  wife  died.  Mr.  Anderson  then  moved  to 
Pine  county,  where  he  lived  for  a  few  years  and  then  sold  out.  moving  to 


134  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Wheeler,  Wisconsin,  where  he  died.  This  union  was  blest  with  but  one 
son,  A.  M.  Anderson.  Politically,  Mr.  Anderson  was  a  Republican,  and  in 
religion  he  belonged  to  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 

A.  M.  Anderson  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1880,  with  Elizabeth  Knoff, 
daughter  of  Peter  and  Melena  (Berg)  Knoff.  She  was  born  on  May  23, 
1861,  in  Norway.  Eleven  children  have  been  born  to  this  union:  Julia  M., 
who  became  the  wife  of  Edward  Thompson,  and  is  the  mother  of  six 
children,  Janice  E.,  Marion  E.,  Ruby  E.,  Lila  I.,  Palma  V.  and  George 
Edwin;  Christian,  the  second  child  of  A.  M.  and  Elizabeth  Anderson,  was 
united  in  marriage  with  Emma  Paulson,  which  marriage  has  been  blest  with 
two  children.  Carlyle  E.  and  Mario:  Albert  T. :  Emma  P..  who  became  the 
wife  of  Augustus  Siems.  and  i<;  the  mother  of  two  children,  Delna  L.  and 
Arvid  H.;  Melvin  O.,  Helmar,  Carl  L.,  Hazel  M.,  Alma  E.,  Howard  E.  and 
George  D. 

Mr.  Anderson  enjoys  the  reputation  of  being  one  of  the  industrious 
and  thrifty  agriculturists  in  his  community,  where  he  holds  the  high  regard 
of  all  who  know  him. 


NELS  T.  MORTENSEN. 

One  of  the  best-known  retired  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  is 
Nels  J.  Mortenseu,  who  for  many  years  was  engaged  in  the  retail  drug- 
business  at  Fergus  Falls,  but  who  has  been  living  retired  since  1912.  Among 
his  other  interests  Mr.  Mortensen  is  identified  with  the  manufacture  of 
sash,  doors  and  frames,  in  Fergus  Falls,  through  the  Fergus  Falls  Manu- 
facturing Company. 

Nels  J.  Mortensen  was  born  on  November  6,  1847,  m  Schleswig,  Den- 
mark, now  a  part  of  Germany.  He  is  the  son  of  Jens  and  Catherine  Mor- 
tensen, the  former  of  whom  was  a  farmer. 

Nels  J.  Mortensen  served  two  years,  from  1863  until  the  close  of 
1864,  in  the  Danish-German  War.  after  growing  to  manhood,  and  then 
learned  the  trade  of  a  pharmacist.  In  the  spring  of  1872  he  emigrated  to 
America,  coming  t<>  the  United  States  by  the  way  of  Quebec,  Canada.  Sub- 
sequently, he  settled  in  Steele  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  remained  for  a 
few  month-,  and  then  came  to  Alexandria,  Douglas  county.  Minnesota,  where 
he  found  employment  in  the  drag  business.  Mr.  Mortensen  remained  in 
Alexandria   for  eighteen  months  and  then  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  in   1876. 

He  opened  a  ding  store  on  his  own  account  in  1876  and  continued  in 
business  continuously  until  1912,  since  which  time  he  has  been  living  prac- 
tically retired. 

Mi  Mortensen's  wife,  before  her  marriage,  was  Lottie  C.  Nelson,  the 
daughter  of   Nels   Nelson.      She  is  a  native  of   Alexandria,   Minnesota,   and 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I35 

has  borne  her  husband  one  daughter,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  Dr.  E.  G. 
Bell,  a  well-known  dentist  of  Fergus  Falls.  Doctor  and  Mrs.  Bell  have  one 
daughter,   Catherine. 

.Mr.  Mortensen  is  a  member  of  Corner  Stone  Lodge  No.  99,  Ancient 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Foresters. 


HENRY  TOMHAVE. 


In  a  visit  to  the  home  of  those  of  our  pioneer  settlers,  who  still  make 
their  homes  in  Minnesota,  one  would  find  many  interesting  facts  concerning 
the  experiences  of  ox  team  and  other  primitive  modes  of  travel  in  the  days 
when  railroads  were  only  anticipated  luxury.  It  was  during  these  trips 
from  the  East  that  some  of  the  greatest  hardships  of  pioneer  life  were 
experienced,  and  it  is  to  those  who  were  brave  enough  to  face  the  many 
dangers  of  the  wilderness  period  that  much  credit  is  due. 

Henry  Tomhave,  farmer,  Fergus  Falls  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  born  on  September  n,  1845,  in  the  province  of  Hanover,  Germany, 
and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Katherine  ( Bungar )  Tomhave.  He  was  edu- 
cated at  the  public  schools  of  Germany,  and  as  a  young  man,  came  to 
America  in  1866,  landing  at  New  York  City,  where  he  was  obliged  to  work 
for  six  months  in  order  to  secure  money  with  which  to  reach  Minnesota. 
On  reaching  La  Crosse,  Wisconsin,  the  river  was  full  of  ice,  and  he  did 
not  possess  enough  money  to  pay  stage  fare,  thus  necessitating  his  remaining 
at  that  place  and  working  on  the  railroad,  finally  reaching  Red  Wing,  where 
he  remained  two  years.  In  1869,  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  estab- 
lishing his  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  the  wilderness.  He 
traveled  from  St.  Paul  to  St.  Cloud,  walking  all  the  way.  There  was  not 
a  building  at  Fergus  Falls  when  he  and  his  one  companion  arrived.  They 
crossed  the  river  at  Fergus  in  a  1x>at  made  of  fence  bark.  This  was  in  the 
spring,  and  they  returned  to  Red  Wing,  coming  back  in  the  fall  with  an  ox 
team,  experiencing  many  struggles  because  of  the  lack  of  railroad  facilities. 
They  had  no  opportunity  to  market  their  grain  without  making  long  hauls, 
and  all  the  buildings  and  improvements  had  to  be  put  on  the  place. 

Mr.  Tomhave  has  become  eminently  prosperous,  dividing  his  attention 
between  general  Farming  and  stock  raising.  Politically,  he  gives  his  sup- 
port to  the  Republican  party,  in  the  politics  of  which  he  has  for  a  !• 
been  actively  interested,  and  is  the  present  town  treasurer,  and  has  been 
district  supervisor.  Religiously,  be  is  an  earnest  member  of  the  German 
Lutheran  church,  to  which  he  contributes  liberally. 

John  and  Katherine  1  Bungar)  Tomhave,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  were  both  natives  of  Germany,  from  which  country  the  father  never 


I36  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

departed.  The  mother  came  to  America  and  homesteaded  one  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  in  Otter  Tail  county  near  her  son,  Henry.  She  died  in  this 
county. 

Henry  Tomhave  was  united  in  marriage  on  December  20,  1872,  with 
Anna  Bradahoeft,  daughter  of  Jacob  Bradahoeft,  by  whom  he  has  had  five 
children,  John  H.,  Anna,  Carl,  Claus  and  Henry. 

Mr.  Tomhave  bears  the  distinction  of  being  a  real  pioneer,  and  has 
gained  many  warm  and  admiring  friends  throughout  Otter  Tail  county, 
where  he  is  well  and  prominently  known. 


KNUD  H.  BRANDVOLD. 

Knud  H.  Brandvold,  a  retired  citizen  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  is  one  of 
the  oldest  and  most  highly  respected  citizens  of  Dalton  and  the  man  to 
whom  all  of  the  people  of  this  thriving  town  refer  as  the  real  pioneer  of  the 
community. 

Knud  H.  Brandvold,  a  native  of  Norway,  was  born  on  May  11,  1845, 
and  is  the  son  of  Halvor  Simonson  and  Kari  Avleson.  Mr.  Brandvold's 
father  died  in  Norway  in  1848.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  spent 
all  of  his  life  in  his  native  country.  Both  he  and  his  wife  were  members  of 
the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church.  They  were  the  parents  of  only  two  chil- 
dren, Knud  H.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  Hannah  M.,  who  was  born 
on  July  5,  1848,  and  who  married  E.  J.  Berdall,  of  near  Garretson,  Minne- 
haha county,  South  Dakota.  They  have  three  children,  John  E.,  Carrie  and 
Henry. 

Knud  H.  Brandvold  received  a  common-school  education  in  Norway 
and,  when  a  lad  of  fourteen  years,  began  learning  the  shoemaker's  trade. 
He  worked  at  this  trade  until  he  was  twenty-two  years  old  and.  in  [867, 
came  to  America,  living  for  two  years  thereafter  in  Filmore  county,  Minne- 
sota. After  two  years,  he  moved  to  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  and  in 
1871  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  has  lived  practically 
all  of  the  time  since. 

Upon  coming  to  Otter  Tail  county.  Mr.  Brandvold  purchased  the 
northwest  quarter  of  section  1  2,  in  Tumuli  township,  a  tract  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres,  which,  at  the  time,  was  little  more  than  wild  land. 
During  the  winter  of  1883-1884,  Mr.  Brandvold  went  to  Polk  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  took  a  homestead  and  where  he  assisted  in  the  organization 
of  a  township,  which  was  given  his  name.  A  congregation  of  the  Norwe- 
gian Lutheran  church  was  also  given  his  name.  In  the  following  spring. 
Mr.  Brandvold  came  back  to  his  home  in  Tumuli  township.  During  his 
early  days  in  this  county,  he  was  situated  about  thirty  miles  from  a  rail- 
road. 


N.U     I  \II.    COUNTY,    .MIX  XI 


L3? 


In  1879,  in  partnership  with  Taral  Olson,  Air.  Brandvold  established 
a  store  at  Dalton.  This  partnership  continued  for  six  months,  after  which 
Mr.  Brandvold  continued  for  a  time  as  the  sole  proprietor  of  the  business. 
Later  he  took  Ole  Nelson  into  the  business  as  a  partner  and  this  arrange- 
ment continued  for  four  years.  After  Mr.  Nelson  retired.  Mr.  Brandvold 
conducted  the  store  alone.     He  retired  from  business  in  1903. 

Mr.  Brandvold  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Farmers  Grain  & 
Lumber  Company,  of  Dalton.  In  [908  he  sold  his  farm  to  his  son-in-law. 
Senator  Ole  O.  Sageng,  who  is  one  of  the  best-known  citizens  of  Otter 
Tail  county.      Since   [908  Mr.  and   Mrs.   Brandvold  have  lived  in  Dalton. 

Knnd  H.  Brandvold  was  married  to  Bertha  K.  Steien,  who  died  in 
April.  1890.  To  this  union  were  born  three  children,  Halvor,  Oliver  and 
K'ari.  In  July,  1892,  Mr.  Brandvold  was  married,  secondly,  to  Maria  L. 
Bakken. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brandvold  and  family  are  members  of  the  Norwegian 
Lutheran  church.  Mr.  Brandvold  has  served  as  secretary  of  the  congre- 
gation for  a  short  time.  For  twelve  years  he  was  supervisor  of  his  town- 
ship, and  for  twenty-eight  years  was  treasurer  of  the  local  school  board. 
Knud  H.  Brandvold  occupies  a  place  in  the  hearts  of  his  neighbors  and 
fellow -citizens  second  to  no  other  citizen  in  this  part  of  Otter  Tail  county. 
He  has  well  performed  his  duties  as  a  public-spirited  and  useful  citizen  and 
today  is  accorded  the  distinction  which  belongs  to  such  a  man  and  such  a 
citizen. 


ESTEN  THOMPSON. 


Unconscious  recognition  of  the  true  worth  of  a  man  who  has  made  his 
opportunities  and  opened  his  own  way  through  hardships  and  financial 
struggle  is  found  in  the  ultimate  conclusion  of  a  well-rounded  career.  Mr. 
Thompson,  whose  name  i-  mentioned  above,  has  demonstrated  a  firmness 
of  purpose  in  his  chosen  vocation  that  cannot  but  win  the  admiration  of 
those   familiar  with  his   steadfast   and   thrifty  methods. 

Esten  Thompson,  farmer,  Fergus  Falls  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  born  on  September  _>o.  1856,  at  Trondkjem,  Norway,  and  is  a  son  of 
Bernt  Thompson.  His  rudimentary  education  was  obtained  in  Norway, 
and  at  the  age  of  ten  years  be  came  to  \merica  with  his  parents,  where  he 
attended  the  public  schools  for  a  short  time.  When  quite  a  young  man. 
Mr.  Thompson  began  farming  for  himself  in  Wilkin  county,  Minnesota, 
where  he  took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  which  he 
sold  in  1903,  and  bought  his  present  farm  consisting  of  one  hundred  and 
ten  acres,  his  time  and  attention  being  devoted  to  general  farming.  Mr. 
fhomppon  has  put  valuable  improvements  on  his  place,  which,  although  not 


[38  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;    MINNESOTA. 

one  of  the  largest,  is  one  of  the  best  places  in  the  township.  He  is  a  brother 
of  Anton  Thompson,  whose  name  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume. 
Politically,  he  is  a  Republican,  and  in  religion,  a  member  of  the  Norwegian 
Lutheran  church. 

Esten  Thompson  was  united  in  marriage  with  Christina  Void,  by  whom 
he  has  had  eight  children :  Bernard,  Rosa,  Edwin,  Inga.  Albert,  Ethel, 
Man    and  .Minnie. 

Mr.  Thompson  is  a  gentleman  of  mure  than  ordinary  intelligence,  and 
keeps  well  up  with  the  times,  and  can  honestly  claim  all  the  honor  accorded 
him  as  a  substantial  and  prosperous  citizen. 


LEWIS  LOHMEIER. 


Following  down  a  long  line  of  German  ancestry,  one  finds  the  name 
of  Lewis  Lohmeier,  a  representative  and  influential  agriculturist  of  Fergus 
Falls  township.  Mr.  Lohmeier  has  followed  the  most  approved  methods  in 
his  rural  vocation,  and  today  owns  a  splendid  tract  of  land  in  the  above 
township,  where  he  makes  the  breeding  of  fine  stock  one  of  his  specialties. 

Lewis  Lohmeier,  general  farmer  and  stock  breeder,  Fergus  Falls,  Otter 
Tail  comity,  was  born  on  March  22,  1864.  at  Evansville,  Indiana,  and  is  a 
son  of  Henry  and  Charlotte  (Held)  Lohmeier.  He  was  educated  at  the 
district  schools  of  Fergus  Falls  township,  and  as  a  young  man,  began  farm- 
ing for  himself  on  his  mother's  farm.  In  1884  he  bought  his  present  home- 
stead, consisting  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  located  in  section  33, 
Fergus  Falls  township,  which  place  he  has  owned  ever  since.  [n  1898  Mr. 
Lohmeier  moved  to  where  he  now  resides,  and  has  since  put  many  valuable 
improvements  on  the  place,  consisting  of  all  new  buildings,  etc.  In  addition 
to  general  farming,  he  has  made  the  breeding  of  tine  stock  one  of  his  lead- 
ing interests.  Politically,  he  has  always  been  a  stanch  Republican,  while 
in  religion,  he  belongs  to  the  Lutheran  church.  Fraternally,  his  alliance  is 
with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  and  the  Elks. 

Henry  and  Charlotte  (Held)  Lohmeier,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  were  both  born  in  Germany,  and  came  to  America  about  1850,  locat- 
ing first  at  Evansville,  Indiana,  and  in  [856  Mr.  Lohmeier  moved  with  his 
family  to  Red  Wing,  Minnesota.  In  [869  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
where  be  bought  a  tract  of  six  hundred  and  fort)  acres  in  Fergus  Falls 
township,  returning  later  to  Red  Wing,  and  finally,  on  lime  15.  [872,  he 
arrived  at  Fergus  Falls  with  his  family,  where  be  spent  the  remainder  of 
his  life,  and  where  he  conducted  a  brewery  during  the  first  three  years  of 
his  residence.  The  children  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lohmeier  were  as  fol- 
low:    Henry,  Charles,  Lewis.    August,  Rosetta,  Mary,  Maggie  and  Matilda. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I  30 

Politically,  Mr.  Lohmeier  was  a  Republican,  and  in  religion  his  sympathies 
were  with  the  German  Lutheran  church. 

Lewis  Lohmeier  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1898,  with  Louise  Zahn, 
daughter  of  August  Zahn.  She  was  born  in  Wisconsin.  Two  children 
have  been  born  to  this  union.  May  and  Eleanora. 

Mr.  Lohmeier  is  appreciated  in  his  community  for  his  genuine  worth 
and  high  personal  character.  He  is  genial  and  unassuming  in  manner,  and 
his  friendship  is  held  in  high  esteem  throughout  his  township. 


ALBERT  DALLUGE. 


The  subject  of  this  sketch  is  one  of  the  versatile  and  broad-minded 
citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  has  established  his  family  in  a  com- 
fortable home,  the  foundation  of  American  happiness,  the  country  which 
he,  like  many  others  of  his  native  land,  has  adopted  as  his  permanent  home. 
Unlike  many  of  our  rural  citizens,  Mr.  Dalluge  has  never  allowed  his 
methods  and  habits  to  become  fixed,  or  his  ideas  to  follow  a  rut.  He  keeps 
himself  informed  as  to  what  is  going  on  in  the  outside  world. 

Albert  Dalluge,  farmer,  Fergus  Falls  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  born  on  August  3,  1869,  in  Germany,  and  is  a  son  of  Julius  and  Caro- 
line (Oehlke)  Dalluge.  His  education  was  received  in  Germany,  coming 
alone  to  America  in  1882.  His  first  employment  in  this  country  was  in  a 
harvest  field,  after  which  he  worked  in  the  timber,  and  was  later  associated 
with  his  father  on  a  farm.  On  March  18,  1914,  Mr.  Dalluge  bought  his 
present  splendid  farm,  consisting  of  two  hundred  and  forty-four  acres,  his 
special  attention  being  directed  to  general  farming  and  stock-raising.  Prior 
to  the  purchase  of  his  present  homestead,  he  fanned  with  his  father  for 
nine  years,  and  in  1903  he  went  to  Brown  county,  Minnesota,  where  he 
owned  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  which  he  sold  in  1913.  Politically, 
Mr.  Dalluge  is  a  stanch  Republican,  while  his  religious  sympathies  are  with 
the  German  Lutheran  church. 

Julius  Dalluge,  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  born  on  Sep- 
tember 21,  1838,  in  Germany,  and  was  united  in  marriage  with  Caroline 
Oehlke.  who  was  also  born  in  Germany.  They  came  to  America  about 
1883,  locating  in  Blue  Earth  county,  Minnesota,  where  they  have  since 
resided. 

Albert  Dalluge  was  united  in  marriage  with  Minnie  Lehman,  by  whom 
he  has  had  the  following  children:  Walter,  Eleanor  (who  became  the 
wife  of  John  Sorensen  ) ,   Mahila.  Paul  and  Clarence. 

By  his  upright  principles  and  his  interest  in  the  welfare  of  hi-  fellow 
man.  Mr.  Dalluge  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  worthy  and  honorable  citizens, 
whose  character  is  beyond  question. 


I4O  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA. 

PETER  and   MINNA  CAST. 

The  worthy  couple  to  a  short  sketch  of  whose  joint  career  the  atten- 
tion of  the  reader  is  now  directed,  have  for  many  years  been  counted  among 
the  representative  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  each  of 
them  arc  well  known  and  highly  esteemed.  Mr.  Gast  has  been  one  of  the 
progressive  farmers  of  his  community  and  .Mrs.  das',  has  made  a  reputation 
for  herself  as  a  most  capable  and  painstaking  nurse.  She  has  in  the  course 
of  many  years,  served  in  more  than  half  of  the  best  homes  of  the  county 
and  Fergus  Falls  and  has  in  this  way  won  many  warm  friends  through  her 
ready  sympathy  and  helpfulness  in  their  time  of  need. 

l'eter  J.  A.  Gast  was  born  in  Schnierin,  Germany,  on  April  28.  1847. 
son  of  Fritz  and  Maria  (  Willert  )  Gast,  both  natives  of  the  same  place.  The 
death  of  the  mother  occurred  in  her  native  land,  while  the  father  after  that 
emigrated  to  this  country,  joined  his  children  and  closed  his  life  at  Great 
Bend,  North  Dakota  Mr.  Gast  is  the  youngest  of  a  family  of  three  chil- 
dren, all  boys,  the  other  two  both  being  engaged  in  farming  near  Great 
Bend,  North  Dakota.  Mr.  Gast  when  a  boy  in  his  native  land  was  educated 
in  a  soldiers"  school  and  in  1808  was  entered  as  a  full-Hedged  soldier  in  the 
Franco-Prussian  war,  serving  throughout  that  campaign.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Fifth  Prussian  Dragoons  and  saw  active  service  at  the  battles 
ol  Vletz,  roulon,  Orleans,  Bruges,  Sedan.  Cikano  and  many  other  minor 
engagements. 

After  the  close  of  the  war.  in  1873.  Peter  Gast  emigrated  to  the  United 
States,  leaving  his  parents  behind  him,  but  bringing  with  him  his  wife. 
They  resided  in  Wisconsin  for  a  year  and  in  1874  came  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
this  state,  which  has  since  been  their  home.  The  first  tract  of  land  they 
purchased  contained  forty  acres  and  they  now  own  one  hundred  and  twenty. 
This  land  is  well  improved,  has  tine  orchards,  good  buildings  and  in  addi- 
tion to  general  farming,  they  raise  a  goodly  number  of  cattle  for  the  market 
each  year.  In  every  respect.  Mr.  Gast  merits  the  name  of  a  progressive 
and  up-to-date  farmer.  Mrs.  Gasl  has  been  of  wonderful  assistance  to  him. 
both  in  capably  managing  her  pari  of  the  farm  work  and  also  by  the  income 
-he  has  received  as  nurse,  as  before  mentioned.  I'liey  came  to  this  country 
poor,  but  with  a  wonderful  supply  of  industry  and  ambition,  and  have  not 
only  succeeded  well  along  material  lines,  but  they  are  held  in  the  highest 
esteem  by  their  wide  circle  of  friends.  They  have  reared  and  educated  a 
a  large  family  and  have  filled  most  useful  places  in  life.  About  a  year  ago 
Mr.  (last  suffered  a  sunstroke,  from  which  he  has  never  wholly  recovered 
and  ha>  since  In  en  bedfast,  but  so  strong  is  his  spirit  that  even  with  his 
affliction,  he  maintains  a  cheerfulness  quite  surprising.  This  pleasing  state 
is  due  nol  onlv   to  his  ,,vvn  indomitable  will  but  also  in  a  large  measure  to  the 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 4 1 

companionship  existing  between  himself  and  his  good  wife  who  does  all 
within  her  power  to  lighten  his  burden. 

Mrs.  Gast  before  her  marriage  was  Minna  Sandhoff,  also  a  native  of 
Germany  and  a  daughter  of  William  and  Maria  (Verner)  Sandhoff,  neither 
of  whom  ever  came  to  this  country.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gast  are  the  parents 
of  nine  children,  two  of  whom  died  in  early  infancy.  Those  remaining  are: 
Frederick,  who  resides  at  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  is  superintendent  of  the 
Manhattan  building;  Belinda,  wife  of  August  Weinrich,  a  farmer  of  Otter 
Tail  county;  Alfreda,  wife  of  Joseph  Doll,  of  Colton,  Washington;  Mar- 
guerite, who  married  Frank  Kalsow  and  lives  in  Moorhead,  Minnesota; 
Richard,  who  remains  at  home,  unmarried,  and  does  the  active  work  about 
the  homestead;  Albert,  a  printer,  of  Winona,  this  state,  and  Gertrude,  wife 
of  Fritz  Kalsow.  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gast  are  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church, 
and  in  that  faith  they  carefully  reared  their  family.  In  politics,  Mr.  Gast 
is  a  Republican  and  was  for  many  years  known  as  one  of  the  active  workers 
in  his  section.  For  twenty-seven  years  he  served  his  party  as  road  overseer 
and  township  assessor,  at  different  times,  and  under  his  supervision  great 
strides  were  made  in  the  improvement  of  the  public  highways.  Both  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Gast  deserve  the  flattering  degree  of  respect  in  which  they  are 
held,  for  each  in  their  own  way  have  lived  active,  useful  lives,  and  in  their 
home  their  joint  endeavor  has  brought  them  a  degree  of  material  success 
commensurate  with  their  effort  and  the  love  and  respect  of  an  interesting 
family. 


TESSE  P.  BILLINGS. 


To  gain  a  broad  experience  in  a  general  way,  it  is  necessary  for  one  to 
yet  out  into  the  world  and  find  out  what  is  being  accomplished  in  different 
parts  of  the  country,  and  in  this  respect  Mr.  Billings  has  had  ample  oppor- 
tunity to  store  his  mind  with  valuable  ideas  in  many  directions,  having  been 
a  traveling  man  for  fifteen  years,  all  of  which  has  been  of  untold  value  in 
his  vocation  as  an  agriculturist,  since  lie  has  been  able  to  put  into  actual 
practice  the  information  gleaned  in  passing  through  various  agricultural 
districts. 

Jesse  P.  Billings,  fanner.  Fergus  Falls,  Otter  Tail  county,  was  horn 
on  April  20.  1880,  and  is  a  son  of  J.  S.  Billings,  lie  was  educated  in  the 
public  schools  at  Fergus  Falls,  and  after  completing  his  education  he 
became  a  traveling  salesman  for  the  firm  of  \.  K.   Fairbanks  X-  Company, 

soap  manufacturers,  during  which  time  he  resided  at  Minneapolis      [1 3 

he  moved  to  his  father's  farm,  where  he  became  a  breeder  of  Shorthorn 
cattle.  Duroc  hogs  and  Shropshire  sheep,  the  cattle  all  being  shipped  to  the 


14-'  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Northwest.  He  is  considered  one  of  the  hustling  young  farmers  of  the 
county.      Fraternally,  he  is  a  members  of  the  Elks  lodge  at  Fergus  Falls. 

J.  S.  Billings,  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  is  a  sheriff  at  Fer- 
gus Falls,  and  his  sketch  is  presented  elsewhere  in  this  volume. 

[esse  P.  Billings  was  united  in  marriage,  at  Chicago,  Illinois,  Novem- 
ber 25,  1901,  with  Julian  Gosch,  daughter  of  Martin  and  Josephine  (Bresky) 
Gosch.  She  was  horn  on  February  7.  1880.  This  union  has  been  blest  with 
one  child.  Sheldon,  born  on  April  19,  1906,  at  Minneapolis. 

.Mr.  Billings  is  a  man  of  generous  impulses  and  genial  disposition,  and 
because  of  his  industrious  habits  and  persistent  attention  to  business,  has 
achieved  definite  success  in  his  chosen  vocation,  standing  high  in  the  esti- 
mation 1  if  the  citizens  of  Fergus  Falls  township. 


PETER  J.  MOBRAATEN. 

The  late  Peter  J.  Mobraaten,  who  for  years  was  one  of  the  most  active 
residents  of  Oscar  township,  this  county,  came  to  America  from  Norway 
in  1869.  He  landed  at  the  port  of  New  York  and  almost  immediately 
thereafter  started  for  Minnesota.  Upon  arriving  in  this  state,  he  located  in 
Fillmore  county,  where  he  remained  for  one  year,  at  the  end  of  which  time, 
in  1 87 1,  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  homesteaded  a  quarter  of 
a  section  of  land  in  Oscar  township  and  there  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his 
life,  his  death  occurring  on  July  27,  1913.  Air.  Mobraaten  was  a  fine 
farmer  and  a  sturdy  citizen,  who  was  held  in  high  regard  in  the  neighbor- 
hood which  he  had  done  so  much  to  help  improve  and  he  was  widely 
mourned  at  the  time  of  his  death. 

Peter  J.  Mobraaten  was  born  in  the  kingdom  of  Norway  on  December 
2,  1839,  and  there  spent  his  youth  and  early  manhood.  In  1869  he  decided 
to  try  his  fortune  in  the  promising  land  across  the  Atlantic.  He  came  alone, 
landing  at  Xew  York,  proceeding  thence  to  this  state,  where  for  one  year 
lie  conducted  a  boarding  house  in  Fillmore  county.  The  next  winter  he 
-pent  in  Alexandria,  this  state,  and  in  the  spring  of  1871  he  came  to  this 
county,  entering  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  government  land  in  sec- 
tions 26  and  27,  in  Oscar  township,  which  he  proceeded  to  clear  and  make 
habitable.  It  was  in  that  year,  simultaneous  to  his  coming  to  Otter  Tail 
county,  that  Air.  Mobraaten  married  Bertha  Spaberg,  who  was  born  in  Nor- 
way "ii  December  5,  [845,  daughter  of  Peter  1'.  and  Carrie  (Torjet)  Spa- 
berg,  and  who.  during  the  years  they  were  engaged  laboriously  in  making 
a  home  in  the  then  wilderness,  proved  a  most  valuable  and  competent  help- 
mate. Their  home  presently  was  made  and  as  the  years  went  by  they  accom- 
plished tin  full  task  of  bringing  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation  their  excellent 
farm,  at   the  same  time  making  themselves  useful  in  many  neighborly   ways 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I  43 

in  that  community,  so  that  they  came  to  be  regarded  as  among  the  leaders 
in  their  particular  locality,  their  influence  ever  being  for  good. 

To  Peter  J.  and  Bertha  (Spaberg)  Mobraaten  were  born  nine  children, 
Peter  P.,  Mary,  Carrie,  Julia,  Minnie  Bessie,  Julius,  Oscar  and  Petrine,  of 
whom  Mary,  Julia.  Minnie  and  Oscar  are  married.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Mobraaten  ever  were  active  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 
church  and  their  children  were  reared  in  that  faith,  all  growing  up  to  be 
useful  members  of  the  community.  Since  the  death  of  her  husband,  Mrs. 
Mobraaten  has  continued  to  make  her  home  on  the  homestead  farm,  which 
is  now  cultivated  under  the  active  management  of  her  eldest  son,  Peter  P. 
Mobraaten,  who  was  born  on  the  homestead  on  December  20,  1871,  and 
who  is  doing  well  his  part  in  the  community  life  of  Oscar  township  and 
the  Fergus  Falls  locality  generally,  he  being  held  in  high  regard  by  all  who 
know  him,  as  are  all  members  of  the  family  of  the  late  Peter  J.  Mobraaten. 
The  Mobraaten  farm  was  enlarged  during  the  occupancy  of  the  late  owner 
by  the  addition  of  eighty  acres  adjoining,  which  Mr.  Mobraaten  purchased, 
the  present  farm  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  being  well  kept  and 
improved  in  a  substantial  manner. 


(  ).  K.  SHONBLOM. 


O.  R.  Shonblom,  farmer  of  Buse  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minne- 
sota, is  a  native  of  Sweden,  born  in  the  northern  portion  of  that  country  on 
July  H>.  1867,  son  of  Ole  and  Martha  (Lindblum)  Shonblom,  both  natives 
of  the  same  section  of  Sweden.  They  were  there  married  and  were  of  the 
farmer  class,  coming  to  this  country  in  1884  at  the  time  the  immediate  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch  was  a  young  man  of  eighteen  years.  The  family  first 
located  in  Des  Moines,  Towa.  where  father  and  son  secured  employment  in 
the  mines  of  that  vicinity  and  also  at  work  on  a  railroad.  After  a  few 
years  spenl  in  Iowa,  the  parents  came  to  the  state  of  Minnesota  and  located 
in  Martin  county,  where  the  father  purchased  a  farm  and  made  his  home 
until  the  time  of  his  death  in  1807.  The  mother  is  still  active  at  the  age 
of  seventy-two  years,  wonderfully  well  preserved  for  one  of  her  age.  Both 
were  reared  in  the  Lutheran  faith  and  Ole  throughout  bis  life  was  a  faithful 
member  of  that  church,  as  is  bis  widow   today. 

O  R.  Shonblom  was  the  eldesl  of  a  family  of  four  children, 
whom  are  deceased.  The  youngesl  of  the  family  also  survives  and  is  engaged 
in  fanning  in  Saskatchewan.  Canada.  O.  R.  Shonblom  received  his  educa- 
tion in  his  native  land,  attending  the  public  schools,  and  after  coming  to 
tliis  country,  has  always  earned  bis  own  way.  lie  moved  with  bis  parents 
to  Martin  county,  where  he  assisted  the  father  in  the  work  of  the  home, 
and  then  in    1004  be  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  purchased  one  hundred 


144  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Buse  township.  There  was  a  residence  on  the 
farm  and  that  lie  repaired,  as  well  as  cither  buildings,  and  erected  a  new 
barn  better  suited  to  his  needs.  He  has  succeeded  well  in  his  undertaking 
and  is  uniformly  successful  with  his  crops  as  well  as  with  his  live  stock, 
to  the  raising  of  which  he  devotes  considerable  time  and  attention.  Mr. 
Shonblom  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  church,  in  which  faith  he  was  reared, 
and  in  politics  he  votes  independently.  He  has  been  a  director  of  his  local 
school  district  several  times  and  takes  a  commendable  interest  in  all  matters 
pertaining  to  the  welfare  of  the  community. 

<  I.  R.  Shonblom  was  married  on  January  i,  1889,  to  Anna  Lorena 
Poulson,  a  native  of  Orleans,  Norway,  and  a  daughter  of  Hilgate  and 
Lorena  Poulson.  To  this  union  have  been  born  four  children,  namely:  Lily, 
wife  of  Arthur  Larson,  a  farmer  of  the  province  of  Saskatchewan,  Canada, 
■and  the  mother  of  four  children;  Ruby,  Harvey  1  deceased),  Harvey  and 
Irene;  Hjelmer  died  at  the  age  of  five  years:  Hjelmer,  at  home,  and  the 
youngest  of  the  family  is  Almeda,  who  is  at  home  with  her  parents. 

Mr.  Shonblom  is  highly  esteemed  by  his  fellow  citizens,  for  he  is  a  man 
of  good  characteristics,  devoted  to  home  and  its  interests  and  is  worthy  of 
heing  numbered  among  the  representative  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county. 


OLAF  TH.  SHERPING,  .M.I). 

Dr.   Olaf  Th.   Sherping,   so  well  and   favorably  known  as  a  physician 
1    I  ergus  balls.  Minnesota,  enjoys  an  extensive  practice  not  only  in  Fergus 
balls,  but  throughout  Otter  Tail  county,   and  is  ranked  among  the  leading 
physicians  and  surgeons  in  this  part  of  Minnesota. 

Olaf  'lb.  Sherping  was  born  in  Hallingdal,  Norway,  on  August  6. 
1864.  He  is  a  son  of  Thorstein  and  Margaret  (Opheim)  Sherping.  the 
former  of  whom  was  a  farmer  in  Norway,  and  who  died  there  in  1898, 
while  the  latter  died  in  1880. 

(  Haf  Th.  Sherping  received  hi-  early  educational  training  in  the  schools 
i  In-  native  land,  and  was  graduated  from  the  Latin  school  at  Christiania. 
Norway.  After  leaving  school  he  immigrated  to  America,  landing  in  New 
York  city  on  May  20,  1884.  He  came  west  to  Canton,  South  Dakota, 
where  he  remained  For  three  years,  and  in  r888  wenl  to  Green  Hay.  Wis- 
consin, where  be  studied  medicine  in  the  office  of  Dr.  U.  F.  M.  Poppe  for 
two  years.  Upon  finishing  bis  preliminary  study,  he  entered  the  medical 
department  of  Keokul  1  ollege,  a1  Keokuk,  Iowa,  and  was  graduated  from 
thai  excellent  institution  with  the  class  of  [894,  since  which  time  be  has 
taken  post-graduate  work  at  Chicago,   New  York.  Vienna,  and  London. 

ediately  after  his  graduation   from  the  medical  department  of  the 
Keokuk   ('ollege.    Doctor  Sherping    located    at     Enderlin,     North     Dakota. 


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OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 45 

where  he  pursued  the  active  practice  of  his  profession  until  1902.  In  the 
latter  year  he  removed  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  where  he  still  resides. 
and  where  he  is  actively  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession,  being 
widely  known  and  recognized  in  medical  circles  throughout  this  section  of 
the  country.  Fie  is  a  member  of  the  Park  Region  Medical  Society,  the 
Minnesota  State  Medical  Association  and  the  American  Medical  Associa- 
tion, and  has  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the  official  proceedings  of  these 
various  associations  and  societies.  Doctor  Sherping  is  practically  the 
founder  of  St.  Fuke's  hospital,  of  Fergus  Falls,  and  is  now  the  acting  sur- 
geon of  this  institution. 

Dr.  Olaf  Th.  Sherping  was  married  in  1895  to  May  M.  Sollin,  the 
daughter  of  C.  A.  Sollin,  and  to  this  union  has  been  born  one  son,  Ralph 
Victor,  who  is  a  graduate  of  St.  John's  Military  Academy  at  Delafield, 
Wisconsin. 

Doctor  Sherping  is  the  owner  of  a  beautiful  country  estate  located  in 
Dane  Prairie  township,  this  county,  about  eight  miles  from  Fergus  Falls, 
which  is  one  of  the  most  attractive  places  in  the  county. 

Norway  has  given  to  America  many  of  its  most  successful  citizens, 
and  Otter  Tail  county  and  the  state  of  Minnesota  have  been  fortunate  to 
receive  within  their  borders  many  of  these  splendid  young  men,  among 
whom  is  Doctor  Sherping. 


CARL  MILLER. 


Carl  Miller,  residing  on  his  farm  of  two  hundred  and  thirty  acres  in 
Buse  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  a  German  by  birth,  born 
in  the  province  of  Pomerania,  Prussia,  on  May  20,  1857,  being  the  only 
child  of  Carl  and  Bertha  (Miller)  Miller.  Both  parents  were  natives  of 
the  same  province  and  spent  their  entire  lives  in  that  place.  The  father  was 
engaged  in  farming  throughout  all  the  active  years  of  his  life,  and  in  that 
way  Carl  became  versed  in  agriculture  while  still  a  boy. 

Car]  Miller  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  near  his  home  and  trained 
by  his  devout  parents  in  the  faith  of  the  Lutheran  church.  While  still  a 
youth  he  learned  the  miller's  trade  and  followed  that  trade  in  his  native 
land  for  fourteen  years,  but  has  never  followed  that  occupation  in  this 
country.  He  emigrated  to  America  in  1882  and  settled  in  Faribault,  this 
state,  where  for  two  years  he  worked  part  of  the  time  at  farm  labor  and 
the  balance  of  the  time  on  the  railroad.  He  was  ambitious  to  succeed,  and 
near  Faribault  secured  a  farm,  which  he  rented  and  farmed  for  one  year. 
In  1886  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  secured  a  farm  in  Fergus  Falls 
township,  which  he  rented  and  farmed  for  twelve  and  one-half  years.  He 
i  rob) 


I46  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;     MINNESOTA. 

then  moved  into  Buse  township  and  rented  for  three  years,  purchasing  his 
present  farm  near  that  location.  When  he  secured  the  farm  it  was  only 
partially  improved  and  Mr.  Miller  has  finished  clearing  the  land,  repaired 
the  buildings  and  brought  a  general  note  of  prosperity  to  the  place.  He 
engages  in  general  farming  and  stock  raising,  such  as  practiced  throughout 
this  section,  and  is  uniformly  successful  in  his  undertaking. 

Carl  Miller  was  united  in  marriage  in  1884,  with  Paulina  Friederich, 
who  was  born  in  Germany,  a  daughter  of  Frederick  Friederich,  being 
brought  to  this  country  by  her  parents  when  a  child  of  two  years.  The 
family  settled  in  Wisconsin,  where  they  lived  a  number  of  years,  later  com- 
ing to  Faribault,  this  state,  where  both  parents  closed  their  lives.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Miller  have  a  family  of  eight  children,  the  eldest  of  whom  is  William, 
who  still  remains  at  home.  Carl  is  a  farmer  near  Wimmer,  North  Dakota. 
Eric  is  at  home,  while  Richard  is  engaged  in  farming  near  Faribault.  The 
others  of  the  family,  Robert,  Agnes,  Arthur  and  August,  still  remain  under 
the  parental  roof. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Miller  are  both  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church, 
and  have  carefully  reared  their  family  in  that  faith.  They  are  counted 
among  the  leading  members  of  their  local  congregation  and  have  a  lar^e 
number  of  friends  outside  of  church  circles  as  well.  Mr.  Miller  votes  inde- 
pendently in  politics,  but  in  view  of  his  many  duties,  has  never  given  any 
time  to  that  phase  of  citizenship.  Throughout  the  years  of  his  residence 
here  he  has  proven  himself  a  man  of  honor  and  integrity,  well  worthy  of  the 
esteem  in  which  he  is  held  by  all  who  know  him. 


CHARLES  M.  ANDERSON. 

Charles  M.  Anderson,  residing  on  his  farm  of  three  hundred  and  twenty 
acres  in  Buse  township,  near  the  city  of  Fergus  Falls,  Otter  Tail  county. 
Minnesota,  is  accounted  one  of  the  most  progressive  farmers  of  his  section 
He  carries  on  general  farming  and  meets  with  excellent  success  with  his 
crops,  while  with  live  stock  he  is  also  uniformly  successful. 

Mr.  Anderson  was  born  in  Norway  on  September  15,  1S61,  a  son  of 
Martimus  and  Martha  Anderson,  both  natives  of  that  same  place.  The 
father  was  a  goldsmith  by  trade  and  his  death  occurred  in  187 1.  The 
mother  never  remarried  and  passed  from  this  life  in  1805.  Both  parents 
were  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  in  that  faith  reared 
their  children.  There  were  five  in  the  family,  all  coming  to  this  country  but 
two.  These  arc  Petra,  the  eldest,  who  married  Christina  Gunness,  and 
Emma,  who  is  located  near  the  childhood  home.  The  subject  of  this  sketch 
is  the  fourth  child  in  order  of  birth  and  together  with  his  sisters,  Mary 
and  Edwarda,   emigrated  to  this  country.      Mary  met   death   by   drowning 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  14/ 

in  Lake  Harriett,  this  state,  while  still  a  girl,  and  Edwarda  is  the  wife  of 
a  Mr.  Johnson,  of  Spokane,  Washington. 

Mr.  Anderson  received  a  fair  education  in  the  common  schools  of  his 
native  land  and  from  the  time  he  was  ten  years  old,  he  made  his  own  wax- 
in  the  world.  While  a  boy  he  did  all  sorts  of  odd  jobs  and  finally  became 
quite  proficient  as  a  clerk  in  various  stores.  He  came  to  America  in  1878 
and  settled  in  Minneapolis,  in  which  city  he  did  odd  jobs  of  work  and  later 
worked  on  farms  nearby.  About  1886  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and 
near  Fergus  Falls  worked  on  the  farm  owned  by  Blake  Brothers,  where  he 
was  employed  for  three  years.  Then  for  the  following  seven  or  eight  years, 
he  worked  on  the  farm  owned  by  J.  S.  Billings  &  Company,  after  which 
he  engaged  in  farming  for  himself.  He  rented  for  six  or  eight  years  the 
farm  which  is  now  his  own,  purchasing  it  about  the  year  1900.  After 
securing  possession  of  the  place,  he  set  about  improving  the  buildings  and 
now  has  a  comfortable  residence  and  good  outbuildings,  the  entire  place 
appearing  well-kept  and  prosperous. 

On  February  22,  1894,  Charles  M.  Anderson  was  united  in  marriage 
with  Sarah  Erickson.  born  at  Orrdale  in  this  county,  daughter  of  Arno 
and  Carrie  Erickson,  who  were  among  the  very  earliest  settlers  of  this 
county.  To  this  union  has  been  born  a  family  of  six,  namely :  Leonard, 
George,  Clarence,  Selma,  living  in  South  Dakota  and  the  wife  of  Albert 
Edmundson;  Florence  and  Myrtle.  Mr.  Anderson  takes  a  commendable 
interest  in  all  matters  pertaining  to  the  welfare  of  community  life  and  gives 
his  influence  to  any  project  working  toward  that  end.  Fraternally,  he  is  a 
member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  is  much  interested  in 
the  work  of  that  order.  He  is  honorable  and  upright  in  his  dealings  with 
his  fellow  men  and  is  entitled  to  the  respect  in  which  he  is  generally  held 


ANDREW  ANDERSEN. 


Andrew  Andersen,  of  Buse  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is 
a  native  of  Denmark,  born  in  that  country  on  February  20,  1865,  son  of 
Jens  and  Karen  (Rasmusen)  Andersen.  Both  parents  were  also  natives 
of  Denmark  and  spent  their  entire  lives  in  that  country.  The  father  was 
a  blacksmith  and  also  a  small  farmer  and  was  at  one  time  a  soldier.  The 
last  time  he  saw  active  service  was  in  i860  in  the  war  with  Germany, 
but  owing  to  the  state  of  his  health,  most  of  his  time  was  spent  in  the  hos- 
pital. Both  parents  were  members  of  the  Danish  Baptist  church.  There 
were  thirteen  children  in  their  family,  nine  of  whom  grew  to  maturity,  and 
most  of  them  are  now  citizens  of  the  United  States.  Hans  J.,  the  eldest, 
was  the  first  to  come  to  America.  He  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  where 
he  married  and  where  his  death  occurred.     Stenne  died  in  her  native  land 


I48  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA. 

of  Denmark.  The  third  child  in  order  of  birth  is  the  immediate  subject 
of  this  sketch.  Rasmus,  the  fourth  child,  died  in  Denmark,  where  Meta, 
wife  of  Jergen  Petersen,  also  lives.  Karen  (Mrs.  Christ.  Larson)  and 
Marie  (Mrs.  Jens  Johnson)  both  live  in  Otter  Tail  county,  while  Peter  and 
Maren  have  remained  in  Denmark  and  have  not  married.  The  children 
who  have  come  to  this  country  have  met  with  a  pleasing  degree  of  material 
success  and  make  worthy  citizens  of  their  adopted  country. 

Andrew  Andersen  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Den- 
mark and  when  a  youth  turned  to  farming  as  his  life  vocation.  He  came 
to  this  country  alone  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years  and  joined  his  brother, 
Hans  J.,  who  had  come  over  some  time  previous.  It  was  in  1884  that 
Andrew  set  foot  on  American  soil  and  he  came  at  once  to  Fergus  Falls 
and  secured  work  on  a  farm  in  Western  township.  He  passed  the  following 
five  years  in  this  manner  and  then  bought  a  farm  of  forty  acres,  unim- 
proved, in  Aurdal  township,  and  also  rented  some  adjoining  land.  He 
erected  a  small  house  on  his  land  and  lived  there  three  years,  when  he  sold 
sold  out  and  moved  to  Buse  township.  For  a  year  and  a  half  he  rented  land 
near  Horseshoe  lake  and  then  moved  to  Western  township,  where  he  pur- 
chased a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  and  made  his  home  there  for 
the  following  nine  years.  In  1901  or  1902  he  sold  his  Western  township 
farm  and  again  came  to  Buse  township,  where  he  bought  one  hundred  and 
forty-six  acres,  which  has  since  been  his  home.  In  1900  he  purchased  ninety- 
four  additional  acres,  and  in  1915  he  sold  eighty  acres  leaving  his  holdings 
at  the  present  time  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  Since  locating  on  his 
present  site  he  has  erected  modern  farm  buildings,  greatly  remodeled  the 
residence  and  has  made  extensive  improvements  to  the  farm  in  every  way. 
He  devotes  his  time  and  attention  both  to  general  farming  and  stock  rais- 
ing and  is  uniformly  successful  in  whatever  he  undertakes. 

A  Republican  in  politics,  Mr.  Andersen  lias  served  the  local  school  board 
as  clerk  and  is  now  acting  as  treasurer  of  that  board.  He  and  his  wife  are 
members  of  the  Swedish  Baptist  church  and  contribute  generously  of  their 
means  toward  the  support  of  the  local  organization.  Mrs.  Andersen  was 
Carrie  Anderson,  also  a  native  of  Denmark  and  a  daughter  of  Niels  and 
Johana  Marie  (Madsen),  Andersen.  The  father  parsed  his  entire  life  in 
his  native  land,  where  the  mother  is  still  living.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andersen 
have  been  born  a  family  of  seven  children.  Sadie  is  the  wife  of  Haider 
Bergson,  of  Fergus  Falls;  William,  a  carpenter  by  trade,  nominally  lives  at 
home  but  spends  a  great  deal  of  time  in  Fergus  Falls,  where  most  of  his 
work  is.  Axel  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-one,  and  Robert,  also  a  carpenter, 
is  away  from  home  all  the  time.  Those  still  remaining  with  the  parents 
are   Fdwin,    Harrv    and    Esther.      The    Andersen    family    are    well    known 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I49 

throughout  the  community  where  they  dwell  and  are  highly  esteemed.  Mr. 
Andersen  is  well  entitled  to  the  success  with  which  he  has  met,  for  it  is  but 
commensurate  with  the  effort  which  he  put  into  his  undertaking. 


ANDREW  C.  OLSON. 

Andrew  C.  Olson,  farmer  of  Buse  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Minne- 
sota, residing  near  the  city  of  Fergus  Falls,  is  a  native  of  the  state  of  Iowa, 
born  in  the  town  of  McGregor  on  April  14,  1871,  son  of  Christian  and 
Rachel  Olson.  Mr.  Olson's  parents  were  both  born  in  Norway,  were  mar- 
ried there  in  1870  and  came  directly  to  the  United  States.  They  went  to 
McGregor,  Iowa,  where  they  remained  but  a  short  time,  and  then  came  to 
the  state  of  Minnesota,  locating  in  Sherburne  county.  Here  they  perma- 
nently located.  They  purchased  a  farm,  which  they  set  about  improving 
and  on  that  homestead  the  children  were  all  reared.  The  father's  death 
occurred  about  the  year  1892  and  the  mother  had  died  a  few  years  pre- 
viously. There  were  four  children  in  the  family,  of  whom  Andrew  C., 
the  immediate  subject  of  this  sketch,  is  the  youngest.  Lottie  married  Hans 
Anderson  and  resides  in  Sherburne  county,  and  in  that  same  county  Annie 
and  Ole  also  make  their  homes,  the  latter  engaged  in  farming.  Mr.  Olson's 
parents  were  both  faithful  lifelong  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and 
ordered  their  lives  in  accordance  with  its  teachings. 

Andrew  C.  Olson  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of 
Sherburne  county  and  from  his  earliest  boyhood  he  was  taught  by  his  father 
to  assist  in  the  work  of  the  farm  home.  He  well  understood  the  secrets  of 
successful  husbandry  by  the  time  he  had  attained  manhood  and  when  about 
twenty-one  years  of  age  he  started  out  in  life  for  himself.  The  following 
four  years  he  hired  out  to  farm  labor  in  different  places  near  his  home  and 
about  1896  or  1897  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  located  per- 
manently. For  a  time  he  was  a  renter  in  Carlisle  township  and  then  pur- 
chased a  farm  on  the  shores  of  Swan  lake,  where  he  resided  for  three  years. 
In  1910  he  purchased  the  farm  of  oik-  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Buse  town- 
ship, where  he  has  since  made  his  home,  giving  his  attention  to  general 
farming  such  as  is  commonly  practiced  throughout  this  section. 

Mr.  Olson  is  one  who  takes  a  keen  interest  in  all  that  affects  com- 
munity life  and  as  an  organizer  and  promoter  of  the  Horseshoe  Lake  Tele- 
phone Company  he  has  rendered  valuable  service.  He  has  also  acted  as 
president  of  the  company  named  since  its  organization.  In  politics,  Mr. 
Olson  prefers  to  vote  independently,  not  being  hound  by  any  party  lines, 
and  as  one  sincerely  seeking  the  best  conditions  possible  he  has  served  as  a 
member  of  the  local  school  board. 

(  )n  November  T3.  1897  Andrew  C.  Olson  was  united  in  marriage  with 


ISO  OTTKK    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Elsie  Paulson,  born  on  April  4,  1877,  in  Waseca  county,  this  state,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Paul  and  Annie  (Knutson)  Paulson.  Mrs.  Olson's  parents  were 
both  born  in  Norway,  the  father  at  Telemarken  and  the  mother  at  Siters- 
dalen.  The  mother  was  brought  to  this  country  about  the  year  1845,  ner 
parents  bringing  their  entire  family  over.  The  family  located  in  Wisconsin 
and  to  that  place  came  Mrs.  Olson's  father  direct  from  Norway,  when  a 
young  man  of  twenty-one  years.  There  they  became  acquainted  and  after 
marriage  located  in  Waseca  county,  this  state,  where  they  lived  for  a  num- 
ber of  years.  Later  in  life  they  moved  to  Grant  county,  this  state,  where  the 
remainder  of  their  days  were  spent.  The  father  died  in  1886  and  the 
mother  lived  until  tgoo.  Both  were  faithful  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  and  highly  respected  by  all  who  knew  them. 

Mrs.  Olson  is  one  of  a  family  of  eight  children,  the  others  being  Halvor, 
a  carpenter  by  trade  and  resident  of  North  Dakota :  Gilbert,  also  a  carpenter 
ami  farmer,  living  on  a  homestead  in  Grant  county;  Carl,  deceased:  Mary, 
wife  of  Samuel  Baker,  of  Tacoma,  Washington;  Theodore  and  Carl, 
deceased,  and  Johanna,  wife  of  Axel  Throndson,  of  Minneapolis. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Olson  has  been  born  a  family  of  seven  children, 
namely:  Alice,  Gladys.  Dorris,  Ralph,  Roland.  Kenneth  and  Lucile.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Olson  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  are  rearing  their 
family  in  that  faith.  Mr.  Olson  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  public-spirited 
men  of  the  community,  taking  a  commendable  interest  in  all  that  affects 
the  welfare  of  those  about  him. 


TACOB  LYNG. 


Born  in  Norway,  February  10,  1866.  Jacob  Lyng,  a  prosperous  fanner 
of  \.unlal  township,  <  )tter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  is  the  son  of  Haldor  and 
Martha  Lyng,  the  former  of  whom  was  born  in  Norway  in  1826  and  the 
latter  born  in  that   country.  June  26,    1830. 

Haldor  Lyng  came  t<>  America  and  1.1  the  state  of  Minnesota  in  1867 
and.  in  [873,  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  purchasing  two  hundred  and 
twenty-live  acres  "!'  land  in  Aurdal  township,  lie  died  at  his  old  home 
in  this  township  in  [911,  and  his  widow  is  still  living.  Thev  were  the 
parents  of  five  children:  Christina,  who  was  the  wife  of  John  Olson,  of 
Fergus  balls,  is  deceased;  Jacob,  who  is  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Henry, 
who  is  ;i  fanner  of  Aurdal  township;  Bernt,  who  died  in  [897,  and  Rare, 
who  was  the  wife  of   Henry  Christenson,  of  Wesl   Superior.  Wisconsin,  is 

facob  Lyng  was  five  years  old  when  he  came  to  America,      lie  settled 

with  his  parent-  in  Otter    Tail  county   in    1873  and  received  a  limited   educa- 
tion in  the  pioneer  schools  of  this  county.     From  the  time  that  he  was  old 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  151 

enough,  Mr.  Lyng  assisted  his  father  on  the  farm.  In  1903  he  purchased 
a  farm  of  two  hundred  aero,  which  he  now  owns.  He  built  a  magnificent 
barn  and  residence  in  a  beautiful  grove  and  is  today  surrounded  with  all  of 
the  comforts  and  conveniences  of  rural  life.  Mr.  Lyng  is  a  general  farmer 
and  stockman. 

In  1901.  Jacob  Lyng  was  married  to  Bena  Hallon,  the  daughter  of. Die 
Hallori,  of  Aurdal  township,  whose  life  history  is  set  forth  elsewhere  in  this 
volume.  Mr  and  Mrs.  Lyng  have  been  the  parents  of  five  children,  Harold 
Oliva,  Helen  Margaret,  jean  Bernard,  Johannas  Bernhoff  and  one  who  died 
in  infancy.      Mrs.   Lyng  died  on   February  2~,   1914. 

Mr.  Lyng  and  his  children  are  all  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 
Mrs.  Lyng  was  a  member  of  lliis  church  at  the  time  of  her  death. 


OLE  SWENSON. 

The  following  is  a  short  sketch  of  Ole  Swenson,  deceased,  who 
from  this  life  on  August  30,  1913,  death  being  caused  by  a  fall  from  a  buggy 
which  broke  his  neck.  Mr.  Swenson  had  for  many  years  been  a  resident 
of  Buse  township  and  was  numbered  among  the  best  farmers  of  his  com- 
munity. He  was  born  in  Norway  on  November  1.  1844,  a  son  of  Swen  and 
Carrie  Nielson.  both  natives  of  Norway,  who  passed  their  entire  lives  in 
their  native  land.  The  father  was  a  farmer  and  there  was  a  large  family, 
four  of  the  number  emigrating  to  America.  Of  these,  Niels,  who  lived  in 
Fordenkjold,  was  killed  by  a  falling  tree  a  number  of  years  ago;  Marie, 
wife  of  Anders  Rasmusen,  lives  in  North  Dakota;  Ever  died  in  Portland, 
Oregon,  where  he  had  made  his  home  for  some  time. 

Ole  Swenson  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native  land 
and  emigrated  to  America  in  1868,  when  in  the  first  flush  of  young  man- 
hood. He  first  located  in  Minnesota,  and  then  for  a  time  lived  in  Wiscon- 
sin, returning  to  Minnesota  in  1870,  where  he  passed  the  remaining  years 
of  his  life.  He  homesteaded  a  claim  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Buse 
township,  this  county,  and  later  purchased  twenty-nine  additional  acres. 
He  first  built  a  log  house  and  to  this  later  added  a  frame  portion  and  built 
other  farm  buildings,  so  that  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  had  acquired  a 
comfortable  home.  In  politics  he  was  a  Republican  and  took  a  commenda- 
ble interest  in  the  affairs  of  the  community. 

Ole  Swenson  was  married  in  January  of  1878  to  Margaret  Johnson, 
a  native  of  Norway,  born  on  June  11,  [848,  a  daughter  of  John  Ingelson. 
The  father  died  when  Mrs.  Swenson  was  but  fourteen  years  old  and  when 
nineteen  years  of  age  she  emigrated  to  this  country.  Mrs.  Swenson  was 
one  of  a  family  of  nine  children,  three  of  whom  died  in  infancy  and  Inn  one 
Other   came   to   this   country.      There   is   hut    cue    remaining  member  of  her 


•15-  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

family  across  the  water,  a  brother,  Ever  Johnson,  who  lives  in  Sweden. 
The  one  who  came  to  America  is  Ellen  Sophia,  wife  of  Hans  Mertren,  of 
North  Dakota.  Twelve  years  after  Mrs.  Swenson  came  to  this  country,  the 
mother  also  crossed  and  went  to  her  daughter,  Ellen  Sophia,  who  at  that 
time  lived  in  Wisconsin.  She  later  came  to  live  with  Mrs.  Swenson  and  was 
with  her  at  the  time  death  claimed  her. 

There  are  four  children  in  the  Swenson  family,  of  whom  John,  the 
eldest,  remains  at  the  home  with  the  mother  and  manages  the  farm.  The 
second  child,  Mary,  died  in  infancy,  and  Carrie,  the  third,  is  the  wife  of  Carl 
Johan  Johnson,  who  also  make  their  home  on  the  Swenson  farm.  Carrie 
is  the  mother  of  three  children:  Orville  A..  ( 'larence  and  Myron  Y.  Serena. 
the  youngest  of  the  Swenson  children,  and  wife  of  Ole  Stinerson,  is  also 
deceased.  Mrs.  Swenson  is  a  faithful  member  of  the  Parkdale  Lutheran 
church,  as  was  also  her  husband,  and  she  has  a  large  number  of  friends 
who  esteem  her  for  her  kind  and  sympathetic  nature  and  many  womanly 
traits. 


E.  T.  RISBRUDT. 


A  career  of  general  usefulness  in  many  directions  has  been  that  of  E. 
T.  Risbrudt,  who  on  account  of  the  various  activities  in  which  he  has  been 
engaged  is  a  man  of  broad  understanding  of  problems  of  business  and  a 
keen  student  of  human  nature.  E.  T.  Risbrudt  is  a  native  of  the  county 
in  which  he  still  reside-,  having  been  born  in  St.  Olaf,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  on  the  31st  of  January,  1874.  the  son  of  Torkel  and  Gurine 
(Soliah)   Risbrudt. 

The  early  educational  advantages  received  by  the  subject  of  this  sketch 
were  obtained  in  the  common  schools  of  St.  Olaf.  He  received  more  than 
the  average  school  has  to  offer  and  from  j8qi  until  1802.  attended  the 
Lutheran  College  in  Decorah.  His  ambition  to  complete  a  college  course 
was  realized  in  [893,  when  he  was  graduated  from  the  Park  Region  Col- 
lege. He  was  "iie  ..I"  tin-  firsl  graduates  of  that  institution.  Throughoul 
his  school  course,  E.  T.  Risbrudt  showed  more  than  ordinary  ability  and  it 
was  only  a  natural  consequence  that  after  completing  hi-  education  he 
should  have  chosen  the  teaching  profession  which  at  that  tune  be  was  most 
capable  of  carrying  on.  Mr.  Risbrudt  taught  school  for  live  years  after 
finishing  college  and  at  the  end  of  that  time,  which  was  in  [899,  bought  a 
farm  of  two  hundred  acres  in  Tumuli   township,   section   32.      lie   remained 


on  the   farm   followi 

ng  the  occupation  a-  a 

farmer  until    i<n 

>;. 

w  hen  be  came 

to  1  »alton  a-  grain 

buyer  for  the  Dalton 

Co-operative   \\  . 

arel 

louse    ^ssocia- 

tion       1  le  remainec 

!    witli    the   -rain    aSSOC 

iation   for  three 

\  e; 

irs   and   in    the 

fall  of    1010  enter* 

d  the  employment    of 

the   First    State 

Bt 

ink   of   Ashby, 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MIXXKSOTA. 


tS3 


Minnesota,  where  for  a  year  he  served  as  assistant  cashier.  Owing  to 
failing  health,  Mr.  Risbrtidt  decided  to  return  to  farm  life  oil  the  land  which 
he  still  owned  and  where  he  remained  until  1912.  Mr.  Risbrudt,  after  the 
two  year-  >pent  in  regaining  his  health,  was  appointed  general  manager  of 
the  Dalton  Grain  and  Lumber  Company  and  has  served  in  that  capacity  up 
t<  1  the  present  time. 

The  marriage  of  E.  T.  Risbrudt  to  Helen  Engebretson  was  solemnized 
in  rSqo,.  Mrs.  Risbrudt  was  born  on  the  5th  of  March,  1875,  and  is  the 
daughter  of  Erick  Engebretson.  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Tumuli  town- 
ship. The  children  born  to  Airs,  and  Mrs.  Risbrudt  are:  Clifford,  who 
was  horn  in  1907;  Russell,  who  was  horn  in  igi.t  ;  Truman  and  Henry. 
Mr   and  Airs.  Risbrudt  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 

In  his  political  interests  Mr.  Risbrudt  votes  independently.  He  has 
done  everything  in  his  power  to  advance  the  business  conditions  in  the  com- 
munity in  which  he  lives  and  as  a  member  of  a  number  of  organizations 
has  made  a  large  acquaintance  among  the  residents  of  the  county.  He  is  a 
member  of  the   Elk's  lodge  and  of  the  Woodman's  lodge. 


JOSEPH  P.  BRENDAL 


Bore  at  Starbuck,  Minnesota.  March  12,  1883,  Joseph  P.  Brendal, 
cashier  of  the  First  State  Bank,  of  Dalton,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
is  the  son  of  Peter  J.  and  Pauline  ( Olson")  Brendal,  who  were  horn  in  Nor- 
way, the  former  in  rS54  and  the  latter  in  1856.  Both  are  living.  Mr. 
Brendal's  father  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Norway  and  in 
[872  came  to  America,  locating  at  La  Crosse,  Wisconsin.  \fter  living  at 
l.i  Crosse  until  1881,  during  which  time  he  was  employed  in  a  saw-mill 
as  a  sawyer  and  .'s  foreman  of  another  mill,  the  family  came  to  Tope  county, 
Minnesota,  where  Mr.  Brendal's  father  farmed  until  [913.  On  coming  I 
Pope  county,  the  father  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  |n 
K)i  ,  he  retired  from  active  farming  and  moved  to  Starbuck.  where  he  now 
lives.  Ten  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Peter  J.  Brendal.  namely: 
John,  \nna.  Ole,  Joseph  i '.  Petra,  Julius.  Lena  (deceased),  Edwin,  Nettie 
and  Pauline  (deceased).  Mr.  Brendal's  parents  are  members  of  the  Nor- 
wegian Lutheran  church  and  his    father  votes  the    Republican   ticket 

Joseph  I'.  Brendal  was  educated  in  (he  common  schools  of  Starbuck, 
Minnesota,  and  later  attended  Glenwood  Academy.  Still  later  he  wis  a 
student  in  the  Northern  Indiana  Normal  School  at  Valparaiso,  Indiana, 
from  [903  to  [905,  inclusive.  Finishing  his  college  educatii 
one  year  in  Pope  county,  Minnesota,  and,  in  1907,  was  employed  in  the 
first  National  bank  at  Elbow  bake  and  the  Douglas  Counl 
andria.     Two  vears  later  he  came  to   Dalton  as  cashier  of  the   First    State 


154  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Bank  and  has  held  lhis  position  ever  since.  The  growth  and  prosperity 
"i  this  institution  is  due,  in  no  small  measure,  to  the  worthy  service  per- 
formed by  its  cashier.  Mr.   Brendal. 

In  1911  Joseph  P  Brendal  was  married  to  Ella  Reierson,  who  was 
born  on  February  22,  [878,  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  G.  Reierson.  Mr. 
and  Airs.  Brendal  have  no  children.  Mr.  Brendal  is  an  intelligent  young 
citizen  and  hanker  and  prominent  in  all  public  affairs  in  his  home  town. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brendal  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 
In  politics,  Joseph   I'.   Brendal  is  identified  with  the   Republican  party. 


mil  11  \(ii:\. 


Born  in  Sverdrup  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  September 
'i.  1885,  Emil  Hagen,  a  prosperous  young  business  man  and  farmer  of 
Dalton,  is  the  son  of  Ole  E.  Hagen  and  his  second  wife,  who  was  Lena 
Sim.  Mr.  Hagen's  parents  were  both  natives  of  Norway  and  came  to 
America  in   1883,  locating  shortly  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota. 

Mr.  Hagen's  father  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land 
m  this  county  and  has  lived  here  ever  since,  lie  L  a  general  farmer  and 
stockman  and  has  reared  a  family  of   fourteen  children. 

Emil  Hagen  received  his  education  111  the  common  schools  of  Otter 
Tail  county.  In  [911  Mr.  Hagen  began  farming  in  St.  Olaf  township  on 
hi-  own  responsibility.  About  this  time,  in  partnership  with  his  brother, 
Ingvold.  he  purchased  one  hundred  and  seventy-seven  acres  of  land  in 
(  )tter  Tail  county  and,  in  1914,  also  in  partnership  with  his  brother,  Ing- 
vold, he  purchased  the  meat  market  at  Dalton.  The  brothers  enjoy  a  good 
business  at   Dalton  and.  besides  this,  own  and  operate  the  farm  together. 

In  1011  Emil  Hagen  was  married  to  Ella  J.  Randahl,  the  daughter  of 
John  Randahl,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children,  Evelyn,  born  in 
1912,  and  Charlotte,  born  in    1014. 

Mr  Hagen,  who  lives  in  Dalton.  is  a  man  of  large  business  ability  and 
has  already  made  a  substantial  start  on  the  road  to  success.  ID  has  a  host 
of  friends  -n  Dalton  and  vicinity  who  admire  him  for  his  industry,  his 
thrift  and  his  careful,  honest  business  management. 


L.RTCK  E.  NELSON. 


b.rick  E.  Nelson,  a  well  known  farmer  of  \unlal  township.  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  was  born  on  December  jo,  [858,  in  Norway.  Mr.  Nel- 
son moved  to  Moore  county.  Minnesota,  with  his  parents  in  1862  and  immi- 
grated with  them  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  in  [868.  lie  was  edu- 
cated in  the  'public  schools  of  Otter    Tail  county  and  has  keen  engaged   in 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  155 

farming  all  of  his  life.  Mr.  Nelson  lias  two  hundred  and  thirty-three  acres 
of  land,  a  pan  of  which  belongs  to  the  old  homestead.  He  began  farming 
on  this  land  and  has  made  most  of  the  improvements  which  are  to  be  found 
on  the  land  today.  The  farm  is  equipped  with  very  good  buildings.  Mr. 
Nelson  carries  on  general  farming  and  stock  raising. 

Mr.  Nelson  is  the  son  of  Ingebret  and  Aaste  Nelson,  both  of  whom 
were  born  in  Norway,  the  former  in  1819  and  the  latter  in  1820.  They 
moved  to  Moore  county,  Minnesota,  in  1862.  and  to  Otter  Tail  county  in 
[868,  homesteading  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  this  township  in 
sections  23  and  25.  Later  they  added  sixty  acres  to  their  homestead  farm 
by  purchase  and  improved  the  land.  Mr.  Nelson's  father  died  in  1906  and 
his  mother  in  [902.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children.  Sarah,  Nels, 
Haldi,  Erick  and  Anton. 

Erick  E.  Nelson  was  married  in  1882  to  Ingeborg  K.  Jorstad,  who 
was  born  in  Norway  on  September  28,  1855.  Mr.  an<^  Mrs.  Nelson  have 
five  children.  Edwin,  Althea,  Conrad,  Samuel  and  Maybelle,  all  of  whom 
are  living.  "Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nelson  and  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  of  this  township. 


II  \  W'Kt  GRINAGER. 


The  largest  department  store  in  Fergus  Falls  is  the  "Golden  Rule" 
department  store,  of  which  Ilaaval  EC.  Grinager  is  the  proprietor.  Like 
mosl  commercial  undertakings,  this  store  has  grown  to  its  present  extensive 
proportions  from  a  general  store  opened  in  Fergus  Falls  on  March  23,  1896. 
The  "Golden  Rule"  department  store  has  occupied  its  present  location  since 
1902.  the  store,  by  that  time,  having  outgrown  its  former  quarters.  Behind 
the   success  of  this  splendid   institution   is  the  personality  of   its  proprietor. 

Ilaavel  K.  Grinager  was  horn  in  Gran  Hadeland,  Norway,  October 
2.j,  T863.  He  is  the  -on  of  Knut  and  Kjerti  Grinager,  the  former  of  whom 
was  ,1  farmer  during  his  active  career,  hut  who  is  now  living  retired  with 
his  daughter  at   Krogstadelven,  Norway. 

Reared  on  a  farm  and  educated  in  the  common  schools  and  at  the  (Iran 
Ann  Skole,  of  hi-  native  land.  Haavel  K.  Grinager  immigrated  to  America 
with  hi-  sister,  Siri,  when  eighteen  years  old.  They  arrived  in  America  in 
May,  1882,  and.  a  little  later  established  themselves  at  Albert  Lea,  Minne- 
sota, where  Mr.  Grinager  endeavored  to  obtain  employment.  The  only 
encouragemenl  he  received  came  from  a  large  merchant  at  Albert  Lea,  who 
offered  him  a  position  without  pa)  for  a  period  of  ,i\  months.  Mr.  Grin- 
ager   naturally    refused    this    offer   and    from     \lbcri     Lea    went    to    ilartland. 

fourteen  mile-  away,   where  be  was  employed   b\    Simon   &    Hoffland    for 
eighteen   dollars   a   month      After   remaining   with    Simon   &    Hoffland    foi 


I56  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

about  one  year,  in  the  fall  of  1883,  he  went  to  Mayville,  North  Dakota, 
where  he  worked  for  a  machine  firm  for  eighteen  months.  He  was  next 
employed  in  the  general  store  of  Chantland  Brothers  and,  after  having 
been  employed  by  them  for  three  years,  established  a  small  general  store  of 
his  own  in  Mayville,  where  he  remained  until  the  fall  of  1895,  when  he  sold 
out  to  Grinager  &  Springer. 

During  the  spring  of  1896.  Mr.  Grinager  came  to  Fergus  Falls  and 
on  March  23,  1896.  established  a  general  store  on  the  present  site  of  the 
Fergus  Falls  National  Bank.  In  this  location  he  remained  for  six  years  and 
at  the  end  of  that  time,  moved  to  his  present  location  on  Lincoln  avenue. 
west  The  present  store  has  been  greatly  increased,  not  only  the  stock  of 
merchandise,  but  the  floor  space  as  well.  It  is  now  a  handsome  department 
store  with  a  splendid  front  and  is  widely  patronized  by  the  people  of  Fergus 
Falls  and  vicinity. 

By  his  marriage  to  [sabelle  .Martin,  a  native  of  Canada,  Haavel  K. 
Grinager  has  a  family  of  seven  children:  Clinton  F..  who  is  employed  in 
In-  father's  store.  Rachel  M.,  Paul  A.,  Haavel  A.,  Emmett  F.,  Katherine 
M.  and  Stanley  A. 

Mr.  Grinager  has  the  largest  and  most  thoroughly  equipped  store  in 
Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota. 


ANTON  E,  NELSON. 


Born  in  Moore  county,  Minnesota,  July  8.  1863.  Anton  E.  Nelson  is 
the  son  of  Lngebret  and  Aaste  Nelson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Norway, 
tin-  former  in   1819  and  the  latter  in  1820. 

Mr  Melson's  parents  immigrated  to  America  and  settled  in  Moore 
county,  Minnesota,  in  1862.  Six  years  later  they  moved  to  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  and  homesteaded  land  where  their  son,  Anton  F..  now 
lives.  The)-  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  and  later 
bought  sixty  acres,  making  in  all  two  hundred  and  twenty  acres.  They 
lived  upon  this  far.m  from  year  to  year,  gradually  improving  their  valuable 
farm,  until  their  deaths.  Mr.  Nelson's  father  died  in  [906  and  his  mother 
in  1902.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  Sarah.  Nels,  TIaldor, 
Erick  and  Anton   F 

Anton  !•'.  Nelson  was  reared  on  the  old  homestead  farm  and  was  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools.  Mr.  Nelson  has  always  been  engaged  in  fann- 
ing, lie  owns  one  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  in  Aurdal  township 
and.  since  his  father's  death,  has  erected  the  present  buildings  and  has  made 
( ither  impri  1  ements  upon  the  farm. 

On  November  22,  1895,  \nton  E.  Nelson  was  married  to  Magne  Bye. 
who  was  born  on  March  22,   [878,  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  a  daughter  of 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  157 

Stephen  H.  and  Betsy  (Randall)  Bye.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nelson  have  eight 
children,  Alice,  Lillian,  Hazel,  Sanford,  Kathleen,  Clarice,  Vernon  and 
Blaine 

Mr.  Nelson  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  has  been,  for 
many  years,  prominent  in  the  affairs  of  the  Lutheran  church.  All  of  the 
members  of  the  Nelson  family  are  identified  with  this  church.  Mr.  Nelson 
is  a  highly  respected  citizen  and  is  known  as  a  successful  farmer  in  the 
community  where  he  lives. 


OLE  O.  EGGUM. 


A  successful  farmer  and  a  citizen  who  has  taken  no  small  part  in  the 
conduct  of  public  affairs  and  in  the  regulation  of  church  affairs  in  Otter 
Tail  county,  is  Ole  O.  Eggum,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  who  as  one  of  the 
esteemed  and  respected  men  of  the  community  is  entitled  to  a  place  among 
the  leading  citizens  of  the  county. 

Ole  O.  Eggum  was  horn  in  Norway  on  March  26,  1853,  the  son  of  Ole 
and  Martha  (Olson)  Eggum,  who  were  born  in  Norway,  where  they  lived 
until  the  year  1873,  when  they  came  to  America,  and  settled  at  St.  Olaf, 
Minnesota,  where  they  lived  for  a  time  and  then  came  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  where  Ole  Eggum  fanned  until  his  death.  Ole  and  Martha 
Eggum  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  Ole  O.,  Knudt,  Emma,  Anna, 
Ole.  Ergreen,  Knudt  and  Anfant.  Ole  Eggum  and  his  wife,  Martha,  were 
faithful  and  loyal  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  taking  an  active  part 
in  the  affairs  of  the  congregation  and  lending  their  aid  to  its  works. 

Ole  O.  Eggum  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  his  native  country  and 
for  a  short  time  he  attended  school  after  reaching  America  with  his  parents. 
At  an  early  age  Ole  O.  Eggum  was  compelled  to  leave  his  classes  and  he 
worked  on  farms  for  some  time  and  then  he  homesteaded  a  farm  in  Aastad 
township,  where  he  broke  up  the  sod  and  on  which  he  built  necessary  build- 
ings and  otherwise  improved  into  one  of  the  best  farms  of  the  locality.  Mr. 
Eggum  now  owns  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  all  of  which  is 
we'l  cultivated  and  improved,  and  completely  equipped  for  modern  farming 
pursuits. 

During  the  year  [880,  <  He  (  >.  Eggum  was  married  to  Rendu  M.  Ohn- 
stad  ami  to  this  marriage  were  born  ten  children,  Olaf,  Joseph,  Martin, 
Christina.   Albert.  Andrew,   Emil,  Randolph,  Emma  and  Elvin. 

Ole  O.  Eggum  has  been  prominent  in  the  public  life  of  Otter  Tail 
county  and  of  .Aastad  township,  both  as  an  occupant  of  public  office  and  as 
a  man  of  influence  in  the  community  affairs.  Mr.  Eggum  ha-  served  his 
township  as  a  supervisor,  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  accom- 
plished great  work  for  his  locality  as  overseer  of  roads,      lew    men  of  the 


I58  OTTER     !\ll      COUNTY      MINNESOTA. 

Lutheran  church  at  Rock  Prairie  are  so  well  known  or  have  proved  such  a 
\\orth\-  part  of  the  congregation  as  has  (  lie  O.  Eggum,  who  during  a  period 
of  more  than  fifteen  years  has  served  with  tact  and  with  unusual  ability  as 
one  of  the  board  of  trustees.  Whatever  the  matter  or  whenever  of  possible 
service  to  the  township  Ole  <  ).  Eggum  has  been  willing  to  do  his  part  and 
has  won   for  himself  a  position  of  prominence  in  the  community. 


1VER   IVERSON. 


A  well-known  merchant  of  Western  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Min- 
nesota, a  man  who  by  his  unaided  efforts  has  risen  from  a  modest  beginning 
to  that  of  one  of  the  leading  business  men  of  the  community,  and  one  who 
has,  as  the  result  of  intelligent  endeavor,  attained  a  conspicuous  place  in  the 
public  works  of  his  locality,  and  who  has  made  a  host  of  friends  because 
of  lii's  pleasing  personality  and  unselfish  nature,  is  Iver  Iverson,  the  subject 
of  this  sketch. 

her  Iverson  was  born  in  Norway  on  May  1,  1864,  the  son  of  Stoner 
and  Gertrude  (Paulsdatter-)  Iverson,  both  of  whom  were  horn  in  Norway 
and  lived  in  that  country  until  August,  1870.  when  they  came  to  America 
and  located  in  Racine  county,  Wisconsin,  where  Stoner  Iverson  secured 
employment  in  a  pinery,  a  place  where  he  worked  for  about  one  year.  Dur- 
ing the  spring  of  1 S7 1  he  and  his  family  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
where  he  homesteaded  a  farm  in  Western  township.  In  taking  possession 
oi  his  claim.  Stoner  [verson  found  the  land  to  lie  raw  prairie  and  without 
improvement;  lie  there  ion-  proceeded  to  break  up  the  soil  and  after  gather- 
ing logs  built  a  lot;-  house  to  replace  the  dug-out.  in  which  he  was  compelled 
to  live  during  the  first  days  on  his  newly-acquired  land.  Later  this  hardy 
pioneer  of  Otter  Tail  county  built  new  and  modern  buildings  for  his  farm, 
sel  out  trees  which  have  now  grown  to  be  three  feet  in  diameter,  and 
equipped  his  farm  with  those  things  necessary  to  pursue  the  most  approved 
methods  of  farming.  For  the  past  fifteen  years  Mr.  Iverson  has  lived  in 
retirement  with  his  son,  his  wife,  Gertrude,  having  died  during  the  year 
1895. 

Stoner  and  Gertrude  Iverson  were  the  parents  of  the  following  chil- 
dren: X.  A.  Nelson,  deceased:  her.  the  subject  of  tin's  sketch,  and  Bertha, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  three  years,  shortly  after  reaching  America. 

Tver  [verson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Racine  county.  Wis- 
consin, and  in  the  common  schools  of  Otter  fail  county,  Minnesota,  after 
which  he  became  a  fanner  and  lived  on  the  home  place,  to  which  he  added. 
by  purchase,  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  where  he  followed  gen- 
eral agricultural  pursuits  until  the  year  [910,  when,  desiring  to  retire  from 
the   farm.   Iver   Iverson  bought  the  mercantile  business  of  J,  H.  Rice,  a  place 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  [59 

located  near  his  farm,  and  a  business  which  he  now  conducts  in  a  most 
enterprising  manner. 

On  January  25,  1892,  Tver  [verson  was  married  to  Anna  M.  Engebret- 
son,  who  was  born  in  the  state  of  Iowa,  July  [6,  [867,  and  with  her  parents 
came  to  Otter  Tail  count)'  in  the  year  1871.  To  the  marriage  of  Iver  and 
Anna  [verson  were  born  the  following  children:  Blonda,  horn  on  June  10. 
[893;  Claris,  January  10.  1895;  Edna,  November  7.  [896;  Ida  and  Agnes, 
twins.  February  I,  [898;  Horace,  Februan  1.  [901,  and  Normand,  Septem- 
ber 23,   [905 

Tver  Iverson  and  his  wife  arc  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 
church  and  arc  people  who  take  an  interested  and  prominent  part  in  the 
work  and  worship  of  that  congregation. 

Of  the  men  in  Western  township  who  have  served  their  localities  in 
public  office,  Iver  Iverson  is  one  of  the  best  known  and  one  who  has  made 
an  enviable  record  as  chairman  of  the  township  hoard,  as  an  efficient  town- 
ship  treasurer,  and  as  treasurer  of  the  school  district.  In  all  local  affairs 
her  Iverson  is  a  man  whose  counsel  and  judgment  are  sought  and  he  is  a 
citizen  of  the  type  which  has  dune  great  things  fur  the  community  life. 


OTTO  J.   BR  WDSl.IFN. 

Among  the  farmers  of  Otter  Tail  county  who  have  made  a  notable 
success  of  their  business,  as  well  as  being  men  well  known  in  the  community 
for  their  interest- in  public  affairs  and  for  their  willingness  to  be  of  service 
in  all  matters  for  the  promotion  of  general  interests,  is  Otto  J.  Brandslien, 
nf  Tumuli  township,  who  was  horn  in  Norway,  July  7,  1856,  the  son  of 
Iver  and  Mary  (Brandslien)  Brandslien,  who  were  natives  of  Norway  and 
lived  and  died  in  that  country.  Iver  Brandslien  was  a  farmer  in  his  native 
land,  a  pursuit  which  he  followed  until  later  in  life,  when  he  was  a  country 
merchant,      tver  and  Mary  Brandslien  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children 

<  >  1 1 < >  J.  Brandslien,  tin-  subject  of  this  sketch,  received  the  greater  part 
of  his  education  in  Norway,  where  he  lived  until  the  year  1878,  and  then 
came  to  America  and  settled  in  Vtstad  township,  this  county,  where  he  lived 
fur  some  time  and  then  he  secured  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  thirty  acres 
of  land  in  Tumuli  township  where  he  now  lives.  Mr.  Brandslien  has  one 
of  the  well  cultivated  and  well-improved  farms  of  the  community,  a  place 
which  is  cared  fur  after  the  must  approved  methods  and  a  farm  mi  which 
the  buildings  and  the  equipment  show  the  results  of  progressive   farming. 

During  the  year  [882  Otto  J.  Brandslien  was  married  to  Berit  Nordal, 
who  was  born  in  Norway  and  who  came  to  this  countn  alone.  To  this 
marriage  were  born  six  children.  Mary,  Johanna,  Enger,  \lbert,  Louisa 
and   Emma. 


l6o  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

Otto  J.  Brandslien  and  wife  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 

church,  and  as  workers  and  well-known  communicants  they  take  a  leading 

place  in  this  congregation.     Mr.   Brandslien  has  served  his  township  in  the 

important    office    of     road    overseer   and   during   his   term   of   office   much 

h. moment  was  made  in  the  matter  of  improving  the  public  highways. 

As  a  citizen  in  public  life  and  as  a  supporter  of  public  measures.  Otto 
J.  Brandslien  is  a  force  in  the  county  and  township  and  is  of  an  element  of 
citizenship  that  has  done  no  small  part  in  the  development  and  advancement 
•of  the  community  life  and  community  interests. 


EDWARD  J.  WEBBER. 


The  late  Edward  J.  Webber,  who  was  a  well-known  and  successful 
banker  and  manufacturer  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  was  a  native  of 
Wheeling,  Illinois,  where  he  was  born  on  April  2,   1858. 

Mr.  Webber's  boyhood  days  were  passed  in  Wheeling  and  Crown 
Point,  Indiana.  Later  he  moved  to  Niles,  Michigan,  and  resided  there  for 
several  years.  In  1882  he  was  married  in  Niles  to  Emma  Backmann.  the 
daughter  of  Francis  X.  Backmann,  a  native  of  Alsace-Lorraine,  then  a 
province  of  France.  To  this  marriage  there  were  born  two  children,  Her- 
bert E.  and  Marjory  L. 

After  his  marriage.  Mr.  Webber  and  his  wife  came  to  Fergus  Falls, 
Minnesota,  where  he  engaged  in  the  blacksmith's  trade  with  E.  Shaver, 
who  was  at  that  time  operating  a  small  blacksmith  shop  on  Lincoln  avenue. 
east.  A  short  time  afterward  Mr.  Webber  engaged  in  the  blacksmith  busi- 
ness on  his  own  account,  his  shop  at  that  period  being  located  on  the  present 
site  of  A.  L  Fellows'  shop.  He  occupied  rooms  over  the  shop  and  a  few 
months  afterwards  moved  into  the  building,  which  was  destroyed  by  fire. 
Practically  everything  he  bad  was  lost,  but  with  the  energy  which  charac- 
terized his  entire  career  he  rebuilt  and  soon  was  able  to  claim  a  first-class 
business. 

From  the  blacksmith's  trade  he  gradually  shifted  into  the  machinery 
business.  Tie  first  put  in  a  few  plows  and  later  a  general  line  of  farm 
machinery.  He  was  soon  enjoying  a  splendid  patronage  and  his  business 
steadih  increased  beyond  bis  expectations,  lie  was  still  planning  to  extend 
bis  sphere  of  activity  at  the  time  of  bis  death,  which  occurred  on  March  12, 
[905.  \t  the  time  of  bis  death.  Mr.  Webber  was  , .resident  of  the  Fergus 
Falls  National  Bank,  president  of  the  Fergus  Lacking  Company  and  presi- 
dent of  the  Fergus  Casket  Works,  as  well  as  one  of  the  joint  owners  of  the 
Manhattan  building,  lie  was  also  largely  interested  in  "titer  city  property. 
Some  years  before  bis  death,  Mr.  Webber  was  made  president  of  the  bank 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  l6l 

at  Deer  Creek,  lie  was  a  director  in  the  bank  at  Pelican  Rapids  and  the 
owner  of  a  number  of  farm  properties  in  Otter  Tail  county. 

Air.  Webber  had  a  wonderful  capacity  for  business  and  a  wonderful 
talent  for  business  details.  His  judgment  was  practically  unerring  and  as 
fast  as  he  accumulated  money  he  invested  it  in  new  enterprises. 

The  late  Edward  J.  Webber  was  one  of  the  most  genial  of  men.  He 
was  possessed  of  those  admirable  qualities  of  heart  and  head  which  made 
him  respected  in  the  city  and  county  where  the  greatest  measure  of  his  suc- 
cess was  obtained.  Aside  from  the  consideration  and  attention  which  he 
gave  to  his  family  he  was  interested  in  all  good  works,  and  gave  his  time 
ungrudgingly  in  the  promotion  of  worthy  public  enterprises.  At  the  time 
of  his  death  he  was  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America. 


LEONARD  PETERSON. 


From  Sweden  has  come  to  America  many  of  this  country's  most  desir- 
able and  successful  men  of  foreign  birth.  Industrious,  resourceful,  serving 
their  adopted  country  honestly  and  faithfully,  and  men  who  in  the  material 
things  i  if  lite  have  achieved  great  results,  as  they  have  in  the  matters  of 
good  lives  and  citizenship,  they  have  won  a  conspicuous  place  in  the  hearts 
of  the  American  people.  Of  this  type  of  manhood  and  citizenship  is  Leon- 
ard Peterson,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  who  is  one  of  the  prosperous 
farmers  and  stock  raisers  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

Leonard  Peterson  was  born  in  Sweden  on  June  17,  1876,  the  son  of 
C.  J.  and  Christine  1  Johnson-)  Peterson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in 
Sweden,  in  which  country  they  lived  until  the  year  1878,  when  they  came 
to  America  and  settled  in  Kossuth  county,  Iowa,  where  they  invested  in 
some  railroad  land,  on  which  they  lived  until  the  year  1903,  and  then  they 
moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  living  there  until,  during  the  year 
[905,  the)  went  to  the  town  of  Fergus  Falls,  where  C.  J.  Peterson  has  since 
lived  in  retirement.  C.  I.  and  Christine  Peterson  are  active  and  devout 
members  of  the  Swedish  Baptist  church,  a  congregation  in  which  they  are 
highly  respected  and  worthy  communicants.  To  the  marriage  of  C.  J.  and 
Christine  Peterson  have  been  horn  two  suns,  Elmer  and  Leonard. 

Leonard  Peterson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  state  of 
Iowa,  and  afterward  was  employed  a-  a  farmer  until  the  year  ro,03,  when 
he  came  to  (liter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  worked  as  ;i  farmer.  In 
the  year  [905  he  took  charge  of  the  farm  of  his  father- in  law,  a  place 
located  in  Western  township,  on  which  he  lived  for  ten  years.  In  the  year 
1911    Leonard    Peterson  boughl   a    farm  of  two  hundred  and   ten   a 


l62  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA. 

moved  to  that  place  in  the  spring  of  the  year  1915,  and  has  since  been 
located  there,  where  he  engages  in  general  farming  and  in  the  feeding  and 
the  breeding  of  highiclass  Guernsey  cattle,  this  together  with  the  raising  of 
Chester  White  hogs. 

During  the  year  1904  Leonard  Peterson  was  married  to  Caroline  Rut- 
land, the  daughter  of  lver  Olson  Rulland  and  wife,  people  who  were  among 
the  early  settlers  and  homesteaders  of  Western  township,  Otter  Tail  count  v. 
To  the  marriage  of  Leonard  and  Caroline  Peterson  were  born  the  following 
children:     Clifford,  P.irdie.  Leonora  and  Carl. 

Leonard  Peterson  i^  among  the  best  known  of  the  farmers  of  the  com- 
munity and  is  known  as  a  man  of  public  spirit  and  a  man  who  is  at  all  times 
willing  to  do  his  duty  in  matters  having  for  their  object  the  betterment  of 
the  community  life.  Mrs.  Peterson  is  known  as  an  active  member  of  Our 
Savior's  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  being  prominent  and  conspicuous  in 
the  worship  and  work  of  that  organization. 


ERWIN  FRED  NEWMANN. 

One  of  the  best  known  of  the  farmers  who  have  made  a  success  of 
agricultural  pursuits,  while  yet  men  young  in  years,  is  Erwin  Fred  New- 
mann,  who  on  taking  over  the  farm  of  his  father,  on  the  death  of  the  elder 
Newmann,  has  so  conducted  the  farm  and  has  so  tilled  the  soil  that  the  place 
is  among  the  most  productive  and  most  desirable  farms  of  the  community. 
Erwin  F.  Newmann.  as  a  young  citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county,  has  con- 
ducted himself  in  such  a  manner  that  he  is  one  of  the  respected  and  appre- 
ciated men  of  Western  township,  to  whom  the  people  of  the  community  are 
looking  for  the  proper  and  intelligent  management  of  the  affairs  of  public 
life  in  the  near  future. 

Erwin  Fred  Newman  was  born  on  the  Newmann  homestead  in  West- 
ern township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  on  October  6,  tS<)_>,  the  son 
of  Frederick  and  Tilda  ("Fabian")  Newmann,  both  of  whom  were  born  in 
Germany.  Frederick  Newmann  was  educated  in  Germany  and  after  serving 
in  the  German  army  for  three  years  he  came,  at  the  age  of  twenty-two 
years,  to  America  and  located  at  Blue  Earth,  Minnesota,  where  he  was 
employed  at  railroad  work  until  the  year  1882,  when  he  came  to  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  and  homesteaded  a  farm  in  Western  township,  on  which 
Erwin  Fred  Nfewmann  nov  lives.  Some  time  after  acquiring  his  original  farm 
Frederick  Newmann  added  by  purchase  a  large  acreage,  until  he  was  the 
owner  of  four  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  valuable  and  desirable  land  in 
tin-  county.  Progressive  and  modern  farmer  that  he  was,  Frederick  New- 
mann  placed   extensive  improvements  on   his    farm   ami   lived   at   this   place. 


OTTER    TAIT.    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 63 

with  his  wife,  for  some  years,  after  which,  on  their  death,  thu  farm  was 
turned  over  to  Erwin  Fred  Newmann,  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Frederick  Newmann  and  his  family  were  all  interested  and  devoted 
members  of  the  German  Evangelical  church,  where  they  attended  regularly, 
and  took  an  active  part  in  the  worship  and  works  of  the  congregation. 

Frederick  and  Tilda  Newmann  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  as 
follow:  William,  Edith,  Amelia,  Emma,  Adolph,  John,  Charles,  Minnie, 
Rudolph  and  Erwin  F.  Minnie  married  Emil  Vollbrecht,  who  died  on  June 
30,  1914,  and  she  is  now  keeping  house  for  her  brother,  Erwin  F. 

Erwin  Fred  Newmann  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Otter  Tail 
count}',  and  afterward  worked  on  the  Newmann  home  place  until,  on  the 
death  of  his  father.  Frederick  Newmann,  Erwin  F.  became  the  possessor 
of  two  hundred  and  eighty-six  acres  of  land,  on  which  he  now  lives  and 
does  general  farming.  Erwin  Fred  Newmann,  in  addition  to  the  general 
farm  work,  keeps  a  number  of  fine  grade  cattle,  and  has  twenty  cows  for 
dairy  purposes. 


CHARLES  YOUNGBERG. 

A  farmer  who  has  been  a  thorough  success,  both  in  the  pursuit  of 
agricultural  life,  and  as  a  citizen  of  worth  to  the  community  is  Charles 
Youngberg,  who  was  born  in  Sweden,  October  10,  1870,  the  son  of  Isaac 
and  Sarah  Youngberg,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden,  where  they 
now  live  Isaac  Youngberg  is  now  a  farmer  in  his  native  land,  he  previously 
having  served  as  a  soldier  for  his  country,  although  he  was  not  actively 
engaged  in  war.  Isaac  and  Sarah  Youngberg  were  the  parents  of  seven 
children,  five  of  whom  are  now  living. 

<  'harles  Youngberg  was  educated  in  the  public  schools,  where  he 
attended  classes  until  fifteen  years  of  age  and  then  came  to  America  with 
his  brother,  Algot,  who  now  lives  at  Elizabeth,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minne- 
sota <  )n  reaching  America,  Charles  Youngberg  immediately  came  to  Otter 
Tail  county,  where  he  worked  generally  on  farms  for  some  time  and  then 
rented  a  farm  which  he  operated,  after  which,  in  1905,  he  bought  one  hun- 
dred and  twenty  acres  of  land  in  Western  township,  where  he  has  since 
lived.  Charles  Youngberg,  as  a  progressive  and  modern  farmer,  has  greatly 
improved  his  farm  and  has  secured  the  best  equipment  for  agricultural  pur- 
suits, this  with  highly  cultivated  land  makes  Mr.  Youngberg  a  fanner  of 
tin-  Srsl  rani  in  Western  township  -nu\  in  Otter  Tail  county. 

During  the  year  1913  Charles  Youngberg  was  married  to  Wanna  Nel- 
son, wlio  was  bom  in  Norway  and  at  an  early  age  came  to  this  country, 
making  the  journey  alone.  To  this  marriage  has  been  l>orn  one  son,  Carl 
Minart. 


164  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.,    MINNESOTA. 

Charles  Youngberg  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Swedish  Luth- 
eran church  at  Fergus  Falls,  .Minnesota.  Mr.  Youngberg  has  taken  no 
especial  part  in  the  political  life  of  the  community,  but  has  preferred  to 
serve  as  a  good  citizen  in  the  more  commonplace  walks  of  life  represented 
in  the  township.  Charles  Youngberg  has  been  ever  ready  to  serve  his 
county  in  any  way  possible,  and  has  been  of  that  company  of  men  who  are 
of  great  value  to  the  locality  as  citizens  capable  of  doing  many  things  for  the 
advance  of  material  and  moral  interests  in  the  community. 


HERMAN  C.  FABIAN. 


A  successful  farmer,  a  heavy  landowner,  an  extensive  breeder  and 
dealer  in  live  stock  and  a  man  who,  in  the  pursuit  of  agricultural  life,  has 
adopted  the  most  approved  and  scientific  methods,  both  as  to  equipment  and 
as  to  processes,  Herman  C.  Fabian  has  shown  himself  to  be  a  citizen  whose 
progressiveness  and  whose  advanced  ideas  in  farm  effort  are  the  pride  of 
the  community  and  are  things  which  not  only  add  to  the  convenience  of  the 
owner,  but  are  important  elements  in  the  instruction  and  advancement  of 
agricultural   interests. 

Herman  C.  Fabian  is  a  native  of  Otter  Tail  county,  having  been  born 
ui  Western  township  on  April  15,  1873.  the  son  of  William  and  Augusta 
I  Roloff)  Fabian,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Germany  and  later  came  to 
America  and  made  their  home  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota. 

Herman  C.  Fabian  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  <  >tter  Tail 
county,  after  which  he  immediately  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits,  secur- 
ing two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Grant  county.  Minnesota,  where  be  lived 
for  some  time  and.  then  purchased  his  present  farm  of  six  hundred  and 
forty  acre-  in  Aastad  township,  where  be  has  lived  the  greater  part  of  a 
quarter  of  a  century. 

Of  those  Farmers  engaged  in  all  branches  of  farm  activity,  probably 
no  one  is  better  or  move  widely  known  for  their  extensive  dealings  and  for 
the  scope  of  their  work  than  is  Herman  C,  Fabian,  who  not  only  farm-  on  a 
large  scale  but  is  a  breeder  of  purebred  Brown  Swiss  cattle,  animals  which 
are  recognized  a-  among  the  finest  to  be  found  in  the  entire  state  or  as 
vicinity.  Mr.  Fabian  also  engages  as  a  breeder  of  Percheron  and  Belgian 
horses,  ibis  together  with  the  feeding  and  the  I   Poland  and  China 

and   Duroc  hogs. 

During  the  year  [908  Herman  * '.  Fabian  designed  ami  constructed 
whal  is  known  to  the  community  a-  a  model  house  for  the  care  of  dairy 
products  and  for  the  grinding  of  \vct\  and  -rain.  On  the  first  floor  of  a 
well-built  and  neatly-arranged  bouse  has  been  placed  a  gasoline  engine,  to 
which  power  has  been  attached  the  cream  separator,  the  churn  and  the  wash- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  165 

ing  machine,  wink-  above  on  the  second  floor  has  been  arranged  a  feed 
grinder  so  placed  and  connected  as  to  automatically  operate  for  the  grind- 
ing of  grain  whenever  any  of  the  processes  of  the  first  floor  equipment  are 
in  action.  In  the  basement  of  this  building  has  been  arranged  a  cream 
cellar,  a  place  that  is  at  all  times  cool  and  well  ventilated.  A  portion  of 
this  model  building  has  also  been  set  off  as  a  garage,  where  Mr.  Fabian 
stores  and  cares  for  his  automobile. 

A  notable  feature  of  the  farm  of  Herman  C.  Fabian  is  the  barn,  a 
structure  which,  though  forty  by  one  hundred  feet  in  dimensions  and  one 
of  the  largest  barns  to  be  found  in  the  entire  county,  was  erected  in  the 
record  time  of  one  hundred  and  forty-six  hours.  In  keeping  with  the  other 
improvements  of  this  modern  fanner,  this  barn  is  well  equipped  and  well 
arranged  for  the  care  of  extensive  holdings  of  horses,  hogs  and  some  fifteen 
head  of  cows  used  for  dairy  purposes. 

On  March  24,  1898,  Herman  C.  Fabian  was  married  to  Emma  Smith, 
who  was  born  in  Friburg  township,  the  daughter  of  Ferdinand  and  Amanda 
( Zuehlsclorfr )  Smith.  To  this  marriage  were  born  three  children,  Alfred, 
Marl  and  William. 

Herman  C.  Fabian  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran 
church,  a  congregation  in  which  they  are  highly  respected,  and  a  church 
which  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fabian,  with  their  children,  support  in  a  most  hearty 
manner. 

In  political  life,  Herman  C.  Fabian  has  taken  no  especial  part,  but  has 
served  well  as  an  individual  citizen  and  is  known  as  a  man  who  will  sup- 
]M>rt  all  movements  and  measures  for  the  good  of  the  community  or  its 
people.  A  man  who  is  friendly  and  of  pleasing  personality  and  a  citizen 
who  makes  of  "South  Central  Grove  Stock  Farm"  a  hospitable  and  cordial 
place  in  the  township,  Herman  C.  Fabian  is  a  man  with  a  host  of  friends 
and  admiring   fellow  citizens. 


TOBIAS  SIMONSON  LIEN. 

Of  those  men  who  of  earlier  days  were  an  important  part  of  the  com- 
munity lite,  citizens  who  supported  all  things  for  public  good,  and  men  who 
were  willing  to  give  of  their  time  and  energies,  even  to  the  point  of  sacri- 
fice, that  conditions  might  be  better  for  those  who  follow,  the  name  of 
Tobias  Simonson  I.ien,  who  has  gone  to  his  reward,  stands  out  conspicu- 
ously as  one  whose  unselfishness  and  public-spirited  nature  accomplished 
great  things  for  Otter  Tail  county  and  for  Tumuli  township. 

Tobias  Simonson  Lien  was  born  in  Norway  on  March  26,  1857.  the 
sun  of  Simon  Lien,  who  was  born  in  Norway  and  lived  in  that  country 
during  his  entire  life,  Simon   Lien  being  a  farmer. 


l66  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Tobias  Simonson  Lien  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
his  native  land,  after  which  he  worked  as  a  farmer  for  some  time  and  then 
marrying,  he  came  with  his  wife  to  America,  in  the  year  1882,  and  located 
in  Aastad  township,  this  county,  where  for  a  time  he  rented  a  farm  and 
then  later  bought  the  place  where  he  lived  for  the  remainder  of  his  life  and 
there  his  widow  now  lives.  The  farm  of  Tobias  Simonson  Lien  was  well 
improved  by  this  worthy  farmer  and  citizen,  who  left  no  thing  undone  that 
his  home  place  might  be  attractive  and  convenient  for  residence  and  for 
agricultural  purposes. 

The  wife  of  Tobias  S.  Lien  was  Ann  Burg,  daughter  of  well-known 
and  highly-respected  people  in  Norway,  who  are  now  deceased.  To  the 
marriage  of  Tobias  and  Ann  Lien  were  born  the  following  children : 
Amund,  Mary,  Martha.  Thea,  Sophia,  Sigvert,  Thoralf,  Alfred,  Adolph, 
Emma,  Emilia,  Oscar,  Amanda  and  Edwin. 

Tobias  Simonson  Lien  was  an  active  member  of  the  Norwegian  Luth- 
eran church  at  Dalton,  Minnesota,  a  congregation  in  which  his  death  has 
caused  much  of  the  sense  of  the  loss  of  a  good  and  worthy  man. 

Tobias  Simonson  Lien  did  not  aspire  to  public  office  but  was  a  man  of 
quiet  and  retiring  disposition,  one  who  preferred  to  serve  well  and  con- 
scientiously from  the  ranks  of  common  citizenship. 

Tobias  Simonson  Lien  died  on  July  13,  1913,  mourned  by  many  friends 
and  fellow  citizens. 


CHRISTIAN  JORGENSEN. 

A  man  who  has  taken  a  leading  place  in  the  circles  of  his  activity, 
whether  in  business,  trade  or  in  public  office,  and  a  man  who  by  the  trend 
of  his  life  has  won  a  host  of  friends,  is  Christian  Jorgensen.  who  was  born 
in  Denmark,  February  11.  1863,  the  son  of  Jorgen  and  Anna  (Rasmussen) 
Christiansen,  who  were  natives  of  Denmark  and  lived  in  that  country  dur- 
ing their  entire  lives.  Jorgen  Christiansen  was  a  farmer  of  his  native  land, 
and  was  the  son  "I  lorgen  Jorgensen,  who  also  followed  agricultural  pur- 
suits,  until  his  death. 

Christian  Jorgensen  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Denmark,  a  iter  which  he  learned  the  blacksmith's  trade,  which  he  followed 
for  a  time  in  his  native  country.  In  the  year  1887  Christian  Jorgensen 
came  to  \meriea  and  located  at  Sioux  City,  Iowa,  where  he  continued  at 
his  trade  for  some  years  and  then  moved  to  Rock  county.  Minnesota,  where 
he  engaged  in  general  blacksmith  work  until  the  year  1908,  when  In-  retired 
from  trade  and  rented  a  farm  for  three  years,  after  which  he  came  to 
Western  township,  where  he  now  lives  on  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
sixtv  acre^  of  well-improved  and  well-cultivated  land. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  l6j 

During  the  year  1884  Christian  Jorgensen  was  married  to  Sophia 
Carlson,  who  was  born  in  Sweden,  and  who  at  an  early  age  went  to  the 
country  of  Denmark,  where  she  was  married  to  Mr.  Jorgensen.  After  thir- 
teen years  of  happy  married  life  Sophia  (Carlson)  Jorgensen  died.  Christ- 
ian Jorgensen,  during  the  year  1898.  was  married,  secondly,  to  Juliane  M. 
Olson,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  came  to  America  alone  and  settled  in  the 
state  of  Minnesota.  The  following  children  were  born  to  Christian  and 
Juliane  Jorgensen :  Sophia.  Anna,  Sigvard,  Marie,  Dagmar,  Ove,  Hans, 
Elmer  and  Vera. 

Christian  Jorgensen  has  served  this  and  other  communities  as  an  occu- 
pant of  the  office  of  school  director  and  during  the  term  of  his  office  has 
done  many  things  for  the  advancement  and  promotion  of  the  interests  of 
the  public  schools.  Mr.  Jorgensen  is  now  one  of  the  influential  members 
of  the  school  board  of  Western  township.  In  church  circles  Christian  Jor- 
gensen is  a  meml>er  of  the  local  Presbyterian  church. 


HANS  S.  BERGERUD. 

A  well-known  and  prosperous  farmer  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  of 
Aastad  township,  one  who  has  been  loyal  to  the  community  in  matters  of 
citizenship,  and  one  who  because  of  his  unselfish  nature  and  on  account  of 
his  sense  of  duty  to  the  welfare  and  progress  of  life  and  affairs  of  the 
locality,  has  won  for  himself  a  place  of  respect  and  esteem  in  the  hearts  of 
the  local  people,  is  Hans  S.  Bergerud,  who  was  born  on  the  family  home- 
stead in  Western  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  on  September  5,  1873,  the 
son  of  Stengrim  and  Mary  (Olson)  Hansen,  whose  lives  are  reviewed 
elsewhere  in  this  volume. 

Hans  S.  Bergerud  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  after  which  he  became  a  farmer,  purchasing  two  hundred  and  fifteen 
acres  of  land  in  Aastad  township,  where  he  now  lives  and  pursues  general 
agricultural  life,  producing  excellent  crops  on  his  well-tilled  soil,  and  also 
keeping  some  purebred  cattle,  which  are  used  for  breeding  purposes.  The 
farm  of  Hans  S.  Bergerud  i^  well  improved,  has  first-class  equipment  and 
is  conducted  on  modern  and  approved  methods. 

During  the  year  [904  Hans  S.  Bergerud  was  married  to  Helen  B. 
Ryden,  who  was  born  in  Doring,  Minnesota,  the  daughter  of  Peter  O.  and 
Ragnild  (Tverson)  Ryden.  To  the  marriage  of  Hans  S.  and  Helen  Berge- 
rud have  been  born  six  children:  Roy,  Ernest.  Palmer,  Linden  and  T.ila, 
twins,  and  Harry. 

In  the  political  and  public  life  of  Aastad  township,  Otter  Tail  county. 
Minnesota.  Hans  S.  Bergerud  is  well  and  favorably  known  as  a  man  of 
tad  and  nf  special  ability  in  the  matters  which  have  come  before  hirh  as  an 


l68  OTTER    TAU     COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

official  in  the  capacity  of  clerk  of  the  school  district,  an  office  with   which 
this  worthy  citizen  has  been  honored  for  more  than  six  years. 

Hans  S.  Bergerud  and  his  wife  are  earnest  and  devout  members  of  the 
Norwegian  Lutheran  church  and  are  people  whose  efforts  in  support  of  the 
policies  and  activities  of  this  congregation  are  greatly  appreciated. 


STENGRIM  HANSEN. 


A  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  one  who  took  part  in  many  of  its  most 
important  engagements,  a  citizen  who  in  local  life  has  proved  himself  of 
great  value  to  the  community,  and  who  has  been  a  most  important  part  of 
the  development  of  those  things  which  have  done  much  for  the  moral  and 
physical  betterment  of  the  township  and  county,  and  a  man  who  has  made 
a  host  of  admiring  friends  as  the  result  of  his  useful  and  unselfish  life,  is 
Stengrim  Hansen,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  October  22,  1843,  tne  son  ot 
Hans  S.  and  Martha  (Kupsing)  Bergerud. 

Hans  S.  Bergerud,  following  the  death  of  his  wife.  Martha,  came  t<> 
America  and  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  in  the  year  1872, 
living  with  his  sons,  Erik  and  Christian,  for  a  time,  flans  S.  Bergerud 
then  took  up  a  homestead  of  eighty  acres  of  land  in  Aastad  township,  land 
which  his  son,  Stengrim,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  had  pre-empted  at  an 
earlier  time,  it  being  what  was  known  as  "double-priced"  land.  Some  time 
later  Hans  S.  Bergerud  was  married,  secondly,  to  Mary  Olson,  who  was 
born  in  Norway,  and  who  came  to  this  country  about  the  same  time  as  Mr 
Bergerud.  Hans  S.  Bergerud  suffered  the  loss  of  his  second  wife  in  death 
after  some  time  and  then  went  to  live  with  his  son.  Christian,  dying  at  that 
place.  Hans  S.  and  Martha  (Kupsing)  Bergerud  were  the  parents  of  the 
following  children :  Gunell.  Thorston,  Stengrim.  Erik,  Christian  and  Chris- 
topher. To  the  marriage  of  Hans  and  Mary  f  Olson)  Bergerud  were  born 
four  children,  as  follow:     Martin,  Olena,  Andrena  and  Gunell. 

Strengrim  Hansen,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  received  his  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  Norway.  With  his  sister,  Gunell,  and  her  husband,  he 
came  to  America  in  the  year  1861  and  went  to  the  state  of  Iowa,  where 
tin  v  located  in  Winneshiek  county,  living  there  tor  a  short  time.  Stengrim 
Hansen  enlisted  .-is  a  volunteer  in  the  Sixth  Iowa  Cavalry,  and  served  with 
that  regiment  for  the  remainder  of  the  Civil  War.  after  which  he  continued 
as  a  cavalryman  and  took  part  in  many  of  the  engagements  while  clearing 
the  Indians  from  the  states  of  North  and  Smith  Dakota.  Following  his 
experience  as  a  soldier,  Stengrim  Hansen  returned  to  the  state  of  Iowa  and 
worked  as  a  farmer  on  eighty  acres  of  land  which  he  owned  until  the  year 
1S71.  when  he  sold  his  land  in  Towa  and  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Western 


('I  I  I-  K     1'AII.    COUNTY,     MINNESOI   \.  [69 

township,  Inter  adding,  by  purchase,  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  more.  On 
this  land  Stengrim  Hansen  placed  many  improvements  and  now  lives  at 
tin-  place,  engaging  in  general  farming  pursuits.  Mr.  Hansen  has  also 
"free  claimed"  fifty-five  acres  adjoining  his  farm  and  running  along  the 
lake. 

1  luring  the  year  1869  Stengrim  Hansen  was  married  to  Mary  Olson, 
who  was  horn  in  Norway  and  came  to  America  with  her  parents,  who 
located  in  Winneshiek  county,  Iowa.  To  the  marriage  of  Stengrim  and 
Alary  Hansen  were  born  the  following  children:  Martha,  Ole,  Hans, 
Gunell,  Theodore,  Gustav,  .Martin.  Gilbert  and  Edward,  who  died  at  the  age 
nf  twenty-seven  years. 

Few  men  have  been  mure  loyal  to  their  faith  and  church  than  has 
Stengrim  Hansen,  who  has  aided  in  the  construction  of  three  churches  of 
the  Norwegian  Lutheran  denomination  in  Western  township.  As  a  mem- 
ber of  his  church.  Mr.  Hansen  is  esteemed  and  honored,  not  only  for  the 
part  that  he  has  done  for  the  people  of  his  faith,  but  on  account  of  his  good 
and  his  unselfish  life.  Stengrim  Hansen  is  no  less  honored  in  the  town  of 
Fergus  Falls,  where  the  St.  Luke's  hospital  was  made  possible  largely  due 
tn  the  efforts  am1   sacrifices  of  this  worthy  man. 

In  political  life  Stengrim  Hansen  has  taken  no  especial  part  hut  has 
preferred  to  serve  his  community  in  other  ways,  the  results  of  which  will 
long  he  to  the  trood  of  the  localitv  and  its  various  life  and  interests 


!\  LR  OLSON  RULLAND. 

One  of  the  prosperous  and  well-to-do  farmers  of  Otter  Tail  county 
and  of  Western  township,  a  man  who  has  taken  a  notable  place  in  the 
public  life  ill"  the  township,  and  one  who  as  a  result  of  progressive  thought 
has  done  much  for  the  advancement  of  the  community  interests,  is  her 
Olson  Rulland,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  January  [5,  1831,  the  son  of  Ole 
ami   lielga   Rulland,  who  lived  ami  died  in  their  native  land  of   Norway. 

Ivcr  Olson  Rulland  was  educated  in  Norway,  where  lie  lived  until 
after  his  marriage.  In  the  year  [865  Ik-  came  to  America  with  his  wife  ami 
settled  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin,  where  they  lived  for  about  seven  years 
ami  then  moved  to  Western  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where 
Mr.  Rulland  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  a  place  on 
which  he  has  placed  extensive  improvements'  and  where  lie  now  lives.  From 
time  to  time  her  (  ).  Rulland  added  to  his  original  farm  until  he  now  is  the 
Owner  of  four  hundred  and  six  acres  of  land,  all  well  improved  ami  in  a 
high  state  of  cultivation. 

During  the  year  [860  her  Olson  Rulland  was  married  t"  Bertha  Bred- 
eveien,  daughter  of  a  well-known   farmer  of  Norway.     To  the  marriage  of 


IJO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    .MINNESOTA. 

Iver  and  Bertha  Rulland  have  been  born  the  following"  children:  Caroline, 
who  married  Leo  Peterson;  Toneta  and  Ida. 

Iver  Olson  Rulland,  in  the  public  life  of  Western  township,  has  served 
efficiently  and  well  as  treasurer  of  the  school  board  and  has  at  all  times  held 
himself  in  readiness  to  be  of  any  possible  service  to  his  community,  either  in 
public  office,  with  its  sacrifices,  or  as  a  private  citizen  prepared  to  throw  his 
influence  and  his  efforts  towards  a  better  and  more  advanced  township  and 
county. 

Iver  Olson  Rulland  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Norwegian  Luth- 
eran church,  one  who  is  highly  respected  and  appreciated  for  his  work  in 
the  congregation. 


HALVOR  P.  LIGAARD. 

Among  those  hard-working  Norsemen  who  have  fought  for  honor  both 
in  their  native  land  and  in  the  land  of  their  adoption,  is  Halvor  P.  Ligaard, 
who  emigrated  to  America  in  1882  and  came  direct  to  Tumuli  township, 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  his  cousin.  Erik  Ingebictson,  had  a 
home.  He  is  the  son  of  1'eter  Halverson  and  Segri  (  Olsdatter )  Ligaard, 
both  natives  of  Norway  and  farmers  in  that  .country,  their  farm  home  being 
known  as  "Ligaard."  Halvor  P.  Ligaard  was  born  on  March  27,  1859, 
and  is  one  of  six  children  born  to  the  union  of  his  parents.  The  names  of 
the  children  follow:  Maggie.  Thora.  Halvor  1'..  Halga.  Ann  and  Segrid. 
Segri  (Olsdatter  1  Ligaard  emigrated  to  America  after  the  death  of  her 
husband  and  spent  the  last  fifteen  years  of  her  life  in  this  country,  with  her 
children.     Her  death  occurred  on  April  1,  1910. 

Halvor  I'.  Ligaard  became  the  employee  of  James  Woodward  imme- 
diately after  his  arrival  in  the  United  States,  and  remained  in  his  service 
for  a  period  of  seven  years,  but  at  the  close  of  five  years  had  saved  the 
wherewithal  to  purchase  a  farm,  lie  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres 
of  land  of  Ole  Hendricks,  which  was  entirely  unimproved,  but  is,  at  the 
present  time,  very  well  improved  with  substantial  buildings  and  has  a  barn 
seventy-eight  by  fifty-eight  feet  in  dimensions.  Eighty  acres  has  been  added 
lo  the  original  property,  and  it  is  all  improved. 

The  paternal  grandparents  of  Halvor  1'.  Ligaard  wire  Halvor  Ligaard 
and  his  wife,  natives  of  Norway,  who  remained  in  their  native  land  until 
their  deaths.  The  maternal  grandparents  of  Hah  or  I'.  Ligaard  were  Ole 
and  Thea  1  Water  1  Olsdatter,  also  natives  Norway,  who  lived  and  died  in 
that  country.  Ole  Olsdatter  was  horn  in  the  town  oi  Pipargarden  and  his 
wife.  Thea  1  Water  1  Olsdatter,  was  born  in  Vetrhus. 

Halvor  I'.  1  igaard  ha-  met  with  some  misfortune  hut  has  persevered 
in  spite  of  all  and  now   is  enjoying  the  reward  of  his  labors.     On  June  27, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  XJl 

191S1  his  barn  was  destroyed  by  fire  but  he  immediately  replaced  it  by 
another  one.  The  former  one  was  built  in  August,  1900.  The  two  sisters 
of  Halvor  P.  Ligaard,  Helga  and  Segrid,  share  the  comforts  of  his  home, 
and  all  are  members  of  the  Rock  Prairie  Lutheran  church.  Halvor  Asleson 
and  Ingebriftson,  both  paternal  cousins  of  Halvor  P.  Ligaard,  were  soldiers 
in  the  Civil  War  and  fought  bravely  for  the  principles  of  their  adopted 
country,  Halvor  Asleson  having  died  in  service.  For  some  years  Halvor  P. 
Ligaard  served  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  at  all  times  has  served 
the  community  to  the  best  of  his  ability. 


THORSTEN  P.  HEGSETH. 

Thorsten  P.  Hegseth,  leading  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  and  prominent 
man  of  business,  in  Oscar  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was 
born  in  Norway,  March  1,  1842,  the  son  of  Peter  T.  and  Beret  Hegseth, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway.  Peter  Hegseth  was  a  farmer  of  his 
native  land,  an  occupation  which  he  followed  there,  until  he  came  to 
America  and  located  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  in  1866.  Peter  T. 
and  Beret  Hegseth  were  the  parents  of  six  children. 

Thorsten  P.  Hegseth  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Norway, 
after  which  he  came  to  America,  in  1866,  and  following  his  landing  at 
Quebec,  Canada,  he  located  in  Olmstad  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  worked 
for  about  two  years  and  in  1869  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  home- 
steaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  33,  Oscar  township. 
On  his  land  Mr.  Hegseth  has  placed  good  improvements,  and  from  time  to 
time  this  progressive  farmer  has  added  to  his  land  until  he  now  owns  three 
hundred  and  forty  acres  of  well  cultivated  land.  Thorsten  P.  Hegseth  now 
engages  in  general  farming  and  in  the  raising  of  Durham  cattle  and  Poland 
China  hogs. 

During  the  year  1866,  two  days  before  sailing  for  America,  Thorsten 
P.  Hegseth  was  married  to  Mali  Evjen,  and  to  this  marriage  have  been  born 
the  following  children:  Christine,  who  married  P.  P.  Moen ;  Petrina,  who 
married  Peter  Fjestad;  Peter,  who  married  Inga  Iverson ;  Nils  T..  who 
married  Betsej  Lystad,  and  Mollie,  who  is  unmarried.  T.  P.  Hegseth  and 
liis  family  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 

T.  1'.  Hegseth  is  a  stockholder  of  the  Carlisle  Elevator  Company,  and 
is  a  stockholder  of  the  Carlisle  Bank,  of  Carlisle.  Minnesota,  and  is  a  man 
who  lakes  a  leading  part  in  all  public  measures  and  movements  for  the 
interest  of  the  community. 

Mali  (Evjen)  Hegseth  is  the  daughter  of  Kristian  Evjen  and  wife, 
natives  of  Norway,  where  the  elder  Evjen  was  a  farmer  and  made  his  home 
during  his  entire  li  fe. 


1JJ>  OTTKR     1AII     COl    NTTY,    MINNESOTA. 

I  >LE  THURNSHELLE. 

Thai  honesty  of  purpose  ami  conscientious  service  have  been  the  dom- 
inant factors  in  the  career  of  Ole  Thurnshelle,  a  fanner  of  Tumuli  town- 
ship,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  evidenced  in  the  fact  that  he  has 
been  school  treasurer  for  a  period  of  sixteen  years.  Ole  Thurnshelle  is  a 
native  son  of  Norway  and  Ins  birth  occurred  on  June  25.  1849.  He  is  the 
son  <if  Thurston  ami  [ngeborg  (Gjelum)  Thurnshelle,  both  natives  of 
Norway,  in  which  country  they  lived  and  died.  They  were  the  parent-  of 
rive  children.  <  )le  Thurnshelle.  being  the  youngest.  The  names  of  these 
children  are:     [ngeborg,  Martha.   Bertha,  Simon  and  Ole. 

Ole  Thurnshelle  is  indebted  to  the  schools  of  his  native  land  for  his 
education,  which  was  completed  at  an  early  age.  In  1870  he  emigrated  to 
America,  where  he  located  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  for  a  period  of 
three  years,  after  which  he  purchased  a  homestead  on  which  he  still  resides. 
This  land  contained  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  and  was  unimproved,  but 
with  thrift  and.  perseverance,  which  are  the  dominant  traits  of  the  sons  and 
daughters  of  Norway.  (  Me  Thurnshelle  has  made  all  improvements  neces- 
sary to  the  proper  cultivation  of  his  farm  and  has  added  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  to  the  original  quarter  section.  In  1876  Ole  Thurnshelle  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Ellen  S.  Vangnes,  of  Norwegian  parentage.  Six 
children  have  been  horn  to  this  union,  namely:  Severt,  Oscar,  Emma,  Alice. 
Mary  and  Edwin.  Ole  Thurnshelle  and  his  wife,  Ellen  S.  (Vangnes) 
Thurnshelle,  are  both  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  and  are 
earnest  and  active  in  the  support  of  this  denomination. 


JOHN  J.  SETHER. 


Among  the  well-known  and  successful  farmers  of  Oscar  township. 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  John  J.  Sether,  who  was  bom  on  the  old 
Setber  farm,  in  Oscar  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  on  March  2.  1871,  the 
son  of  John  J.  and  Mary  1  Serum)  Sether.  natives  of  Norway.  John  J. 
Sether  came  to  America  in  i S r »< >  and  located  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Minne- 
sota, where  he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Oscar 
township,  and  pre-empted  forty-live  acres  in  section  34,  Oscar  township,  a 
farm  which  the  elder  Sether  cultivated  until  1913,  when  he  retired  and 
moved  to  Fillmore  comity,  Minnesota.  Mary,  the  wife  of  John  J.  Sether, 
Sr.,  died  on  March  5.  iNN}.  John  J.  and  Mary  Sether  were  the  parents  of 
four  children.  John.  Ole,  Lena  and  Annie.  The  elder  Sether  and  his  wife 
were  leading  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  of  Oscar  town- 
ship. 

John    I.    Sether.   the  subject   of  this  sketch,   was  educated   in   the  public 


OTTJ-.R    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  173 

schools  of  Oscar  township,  after  which  he  became  a  farmer  on  the  home 
farm,  a  place  which  he  has  since  cultivated.  As  a  farmer,  Mr.  Sether 
makes  a  specialty  of  all  kinds  of  live  stock,  he  being  especially  successful 
in  the  breeding  of  I 'eland  China  hogs.  John  J,  Sether  has  improved  his 
farm  with  a  modern  house,  a  splendid  barn,  and  he  lias  equipped  his  farm 
with  the  most  approved  and  modern  machinery  and  implements. 

On  June  20,  1901,  John  J.  Sether  was  married  to  Ida  Skisthad,  who 
was  bum  in  Fergus  Kails  township  on  February  7.  1873,  the  daughter  of 
her  and  Syn'era  (Hilestad)  Skisthad,  well-known  people  of  Otter  Tail 
conntw  Minnesota.  To  the  marriage  of  John  J.  and  Ida  Sether  have  been 
born  five  children:  Ida,  Haakon,  Sannah,  Sigrad  and  Ingward.  Mrs. 
John  J.  Sether's  mother  died  on  April  9.  1914.  Mr.  Sether  and  his  children 
are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  a  congregation  in  which 
John  T.  Sether  is  known  as  one  of  the  most  interested  and  devout  workers. 


CARL  D.  HAUGEN. 


The  task  of  the  biographer  is  not  an  easy  one  in  attempting  to  intelli- 
gently present  the  history  of  a  prominent  business  man  in  any  community 
within  the  limited  space  allowed  in  a  volume  of  this  character;  therefore, 
only  a  few  of  the  most  important  events  in  the  life  of  Carl  D.  Haugen  are 
here  presented   for  perusal. 

Carl  I).  Haugen,  implement  dealer,  Pelican  Rapids,  Otter  Tail  county, 
was  born  on  October  25,  [873,  in  Rock  conntw  Minnesota,  and  is  a  son  of 
Xels  and  Martha  (Engebretson")  Haugen.  He  received  his  early  education 
at  the  public  schools  of  Pelican  Rapids,  and  later  attended  the  Lutheran 
College  at  Decorah,  fowa,  for  three  years,  from  1 88o  to  the  spring  of 
1893.  \fter  completing  bis  education  lie  engaged  in  the  implement  busi- 
ness at  Pelican  Rapids,  in  partnership  with  his  father,  who  retired  from 
active  business  in  [9]  1,  the  interest  of  his  father  being  taken  by  bis  brother, 
Edward,  and  the  business  is  now  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of  Haugen 
lb-others,  who  do  a  general  implement  business,  handling  all  kinds  of  farm 
implements  and  farmers'  supplies.  Mr.  Haugen  is  an  attentive  member  of 
the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  in  the  work  of  which  he  lakes  an  active 
part,  ile  is  a  public-spirited  man.  and  has  officiated  as  town  president  for 
many  years:  is  a  member  of  the  town  board,  member  of  the  school  board, 
and  is  vice-presidenl  of  tin-  Firsl  National  Bank  of  Pelican  Rapids.  M<-  is 
also  president  of  the  Pelican  Telephone  Company. 

Xels   Haugen,    father  of  the  subject   of  this   sketch,   was  born   in    Hol- 

lingdal,   Norway,  and  was  united  in  marriage  with  Martha   Engebretson,  a 

ty,   Wisconsin.     When  three  years  of  age,   he  came  to 

America   with    bis   parents,    who   located    in    Rock    county,    Wisconsin,   where 


174  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

he  grew  to  manhood.  In  1882  he  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  finally  set- 
tling at  Pelican  Rapids,  where  he  engaged  in  the  implement  business,  and 
bought  and  sold  horses,  shipping  them  in  large  numbers.  In  1911  Mr. 
Haugen  retired  from  active  business.  Politically,  he  is  a  stanch  Republican, 
while  his  religious  sympathies  are  with  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church, 
and  he  has  been  actively  interested  in  the  advancement  of  his  township.  To 
Xels  and  Martha  (Engebretson)  Haugen  have  been  born  three  children: 
Carl   1)..  Christine,  who  became  the  wife  of  Reverend  Ovri,  and  Eddie  X. 

Carl  I).  Haugen  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1901,  with  Lottie  M.  Bly- 
berg,  daughter  of  (  ).  A.  E.  Blyberg,  to  which  marriage  have  been  born  two 
children,   Edmund  B.  and  Douglas  C. 

Eddie  X.  Haugen,  brother  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  born  on 
February  7.  1X80.  in  Rock  count)",  Wisconsin.  His  early  education  was 
received  at  the  public  schools  of  Pelican  Rapids,  and  later  he  attended 
school  at  Fergus  balls,  completing  his  education  at  the  Lutheran  College  at 
thai  place,  after  which  he  took  a  course  at  the  Minnesota  State  Agricultural 
(  ollege.  In  191 J  he  engaged  in  the  implement  business  with  his  brother 
a-  a  partner,  under  the  firm  name  of  Haugen  Brothers. 

Carl  1).  Haugen  represents  twentieth  century  progressiveness,  and  in 
his  well-equipped  establishment  handles  the  latest  and  most  approved  class 
of  farm  implements,  and  through  his  pleasant  and  agreeable  manner  of 
handling  his  customers  his  name  is  favorably  known  throughout  the  county. 


ERIC  SMITH. 


Eric  Smith,  a  native  of  Sweden,  was  born  on  October  27,  1881.  and 
came  with  his  parents,  Olaf  and  Mary  Smith,  to  the  United  States  in  1883 
The  family  having  landed  at  Castle  Garden.  New  York,  came  direct  to 
Otter  bail  county.  Here  the  father,  at  tirst.  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land 
and  later  forty  acres  more  of  railroad  land.  At  the  time  of  his  retirement 
to  Fergus  Falls,  in  1914.  he  owned  five  hundred  and  thirty  acres  of  well- 
improved  bind.  Previous  to  his  retirement  he  had  turned  the  management 
of  tlie  farm  over  to  his  son,   Eric. 

Olaf  Smith  ami  wife  are  the  parents  of  six  children:  Andrew,  Ole, 
Eric,  Mary,  Carrie  and  Anna.  Andrew  married  Amanda  Holmgren,  who 
died  some  time  ago.  IK-  is  now  living  in  Canada.  <  tie  is  still  single  and 
lues  ,-it  home  with  his  parents.  The  family  are  members  of  the  Swedish 
Baptisl  church  and  take  an  active  interest  in  its  work.  Mr.  Smith  was  for 
a  time  school  treasurer  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers  Elevator  Com- 
pany, he  also  owns  stock  in  the  Creamery  Company  of  Rothsay. 

Eric  Smith  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Oscar  township 
and  had  one   year's   work   in   a  business  college       On    September  4.    tqio.   he 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1J^ 

and  Marion  Peterson  were  united  in  marriage  and  they  are  the  parents  of 
"lie  child.   Vivian. 

In  1910  Eric  Smith  bought  two  hundred  acres  of  the  home  place,  he 
already  owning  a  one-half  interest  in  forty  acres  that  adjoined.  The  farm 
is  well  improved  and  the  buildings,  most  of  which  were  erected  by  his 
father,  are  kept  in  excellent  repair. 

.Mr.  Smith  is  a  most  successful  and  progressive  farmer,  and  is  held  in 
high  esteem  by  the  people  of  his  home  county.  He  is  at  present  clerk  of  the 
school  district. 


CHRISTIAN  P.   SETHRE. 

Christian  P.  Sethre  is  a  native  of  Norway,  having  been  born  in  that 
country  on  February  2,  1862.  a  son  of  Peter  and  Gunhild  (  Berger)  Sethre, 
and  came  to  America  with  his  parents  in  [867.  The  family,  after  landing 
at  Quebec,  came  directly  to  Minnesota.  The  life  history  of  the  parents  is 
more  fully  set  out  in  the  sketch  of  Hans  P.  Sethre,  presented  elsewhere  in 
this  volume. 

Christian  P.  Sethre  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  Otter  Tail 
county  and  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  that  county. 
He  was  married  on  April  8,  1885.  to  Lora  Thrugstad,  who  was  born  in 
Fillmore  county,  the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henrik  Thrugstad. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sethre  the  following  children  have  been  born :  Anna. 
Helen,  Edna,  Harry,  Martha.  Martin.  Carl  and  Leonard.  Anna  is  married. 
.Martin  and  Martha  are  twins. 

Mr  Sethre  bought  the  home  place  where  he  now  resides  in  1881  but 
was  too  young  to  get  the  deed  for  the  place  at  that  time.  The  original 
farm  consisted  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  but  to  this  has  been  added 
forty  acres  and  he  now  owns  two  hundred  acres.  Most  of  the  farm  is 
cleared  and  well  improved.  The  greater  part  of  the  improvements  have 
been  placed  by  Mr.  Sethre.  The  splendid  new  house  was  built  in  190^,  the 
large  barn,  thirty-eight  1>\  eight)  feet,  was  completed  in  1010  and  the  silo 
erected  in    [Qi4- 

Mr.  Sethre  practices  general  fanning  and  is  an  extensive  breeder  of 
Shorthorn  cattle  and  Poland  China  bugs  lie  takes  the  greatest  interest  in 
the  development  of  bis  farm  and  the  care  of  bis  stock. 

The  family  are  active  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  take  much 
interest  in  its  growth  and  success.  Mr.  Sethre  is  a  man  who  enjoys  the 
confidence  and  esteem  of  all  who  know  him.  He  is  progressive  and  active 
in  all  thai  pertains  to  the  home  and  the  community.  He  is  a  stockholder  in 
the  Carlisle  Rank  and  in  the  Farmers  Elevator  Companv. 


J  ;0  OTTER   TAIL  C0UN  IV,     MINNESOTA. 

GUSTAF  A.  LINDQUIST. 

Few  men  have  been  more  prominent  in  the  official  life  of  Fergus  Falls 
thaii  Gustaf  A.  Lindquist,  who  has  been  a  resident  of  Otter  Tail  county  for 
many  years  and  who  during  the  eighties,  after  having  been  elected  to  the 
oi  treasurer  of  <  >tter  Tail  county,  filled  the  office  for  eight  years  and 
ten  months.  Furthermore,  he  has  held  practically  all  of  the  municipal  offices 
within  the  gift  of  the  people  of  Fergus  Falls  and.  as  long  ago  as  [869, 
as  the  first  town  clerk  of  Parker-  Prairie  immediately  after  its  organ- 
ization as  a  municipality.  It  would  be  expected,  therefore,  that  .Mr.  Lind- 
quist 1-  well  know  to  the  people  of  Fergus  Falls  and  Otter  Tail  count}'. 
Not  only  is  he  well  known,  but  in  bis  long  and  useful  life  be  has  commanded 
th<   esteem  and  respect  of  his  neighbors  and   fellow   townsmen. 

1  kistaf  \.  i  .indquist  was  born  on  October  30,  [837,  in  Smoland,  situated 
in  the  southern  part  of  Sweden,  the  son  of  Jonas  and.  Kale  4  Nelson)  Lind- 
quist. With  bis  brothers.  Peter  X.  and  Frank  A.,  he  came  to  America  in 
August,  1X1.7.  and  after  arriving  in  America  lived  for  a  time  at  Center 
City,  (  hii  tgo  coi  nty,  .Minnesota,  during  his  first  winter  in  America,  work- 
ing in  a  store  and  attending  school,  with  a  view  to  improving  his  knowledge 
of  English.  Later  he  went  to  Osceola,  where  he  worked  in  a  hotel  and 
continued  bis  English  schooling.  In  April.  r868,  Mr.  Lindquist  returned 
to  Sweden  and  brought  hack  with  him  to  America  his  father,  mother  and 
sister,  Christine,  the  latter  of  whom  is  now  Mrs.  Olson,  of  the  state  of 
California.      Both   of    Mr.   Lindquist's  parents  are  now  deceased. 

Upon  his  return  to  America,  Gustaf  V  Lindquist  came  West  to  the 
St.  Croix  valley,  where  he  left  his  parents  and.  in  company  with  John  G. 
Nelson,  engaged  in  prospecting  land.  He  finall)  settled  at  Parkers  Prairie, 
1  >tter  Tail  county,  where  he  continued  farming  for  fourteen  years.  In  1881 
Mr.  Lindquist  was  elected  treasurer  of  the  county  and  the  next  year  moved 
to  Fergus  balls,  filling  the  office  alto-ether  eighl  years  and  ten  months. 
This  long  tenure  in  itself  is  the  best  proof  that  can  be  cited  of  the  efficiency 
with  which  he  discharged  the  duties  of  this  important  office  and  of  his 
popularity  as  a  public  servant.  Upon  tne  expiration  of  bis  term  of  office, 
Mr.   Lindquisl   purchased  a  dray  line,  which  he  St')]  operates. 

l'.\  his  marriage  to  Mrs.  Johanna  (Nelson)  I. elder,  the  daughter  of 
Swan  and  Christine  (Jenson)  Nelson,  who  was  born  in  Sweden  and  who 
came  to  America  with  her  parents  in  1853,  and  who  has  one  son.  Fred,  by 
her  previous  marriage.  Mr.  T.indi|tiist  has  had  eight  children,  namely: 
\lhert  J.,   who   man  Hegna   and   is  a   merchant   in    Minneapolis; 

•  diaries  (  )..  who  In  1  home;  Henry  E.,  who  married  Alice  Vanderlip,  of 
.    Massachusetts,  and  has  on.    son,   Richard:  Walter  A.,  who  married 


'- 

Hi^HHiBSKBflH 

■Hm^^^i 

> 

V. 

- 

7. 

"v.. ' 

r :  .-?*^ 

UTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 77 

Edith  Atkinson,  and  has  two  children,  Willard  and  Aileen;  Einilie,  who 
married  John  F.  McGrath;  Helma  and  Helda  (twins),  the  former  of  whom 
is  a  teacher  at  Marshall,  Minnesota,  and  the  latter,  at  Fairbault,  Minnesota, 
and  Edward  A.,  who  is  a  resident  of  Fergus  Falls.  Mrs.  Lindquist,  after 
coming  to  America  with  her  parents  in  1853,  accompanied  them  West  to  the 
St.  Croix  valley,  where  her  father,  Swan  Nelson,  enlisted  as  a  soldier  in 
the  Union  army  during  the  great  Civil  War.  During  this  war  he  contracted 
a  fatal  disease  and  did  not  return  from  the  service. 

Mr.  and  Airs.  Lindquist  have  reared  a  large  and  industrious  family, 
children  who  are  doing  well  their  respective  parts  in  the  various  com- 
munities in  which  they  live  and  who  are  performing  admirably  the  duties 
of  honorable  and  upright  citizens. 

The  venerable  Gustaf  A.  Lindquist  retains  a  very  vivid  recollection  of 
pioneer  days  in  Otter  Tail  county  and  his  fund  of  reminiscences  relating 
to  those  days  prove  an  inexhaustible  source  of  entertainment  for  his  friends. 
He  helped  to  cut  the  first  road  from  Parkers  Prairie  to  Otter  Tail  city,  the 
task  requiring  a  full  week,  he  and  his  companions  being  compelled  to  camp 
out  in  the  snow  during  the  time  they  were  thus  engaged,  and  he  hauled  the 
first  load  of  lumber  from  Otter  Tail  city  to  Parkers  Prairie,  the  trip,  with 
ox  teams,  requiring  three  days.  Mr.  Lindquist  acted  as  a  guide  to  Charles 
Peake,  the  first  mail  carrier  in  Otter  Tail  county,  whose  route  was  from 
Osakis,  on  the  eastern  edge  of  Douglas  county,  through  Parkers  Prairie  to 
Otter  Tail  city,  then  the  county  seat  of  this  county.  The  pioneer  mail  car- 
rier'reached  Parkers  Prairie  on  July  4,  1870,  on  his  first  trip,  and  on  the 
next  day,  started  at  four  o'clock  in  the  morning.  Mr.  Lindquist  started  out 
tn  guide  him  through  the  timber,  on  foot,  to  Otter  Tail  city,  nearly  thirty 
miles  away,  which  place  was  reached  shortly  after  three  o'clock  in  the  after- 
noon of  July  5.  There  they  found  five  hundred  Chippewa  Indians  round- 
ing out  a  two-days  celebration  of  the  Fourth  of  July,  during  which  they 
had  l>een  having  horse  race--  and  games  in  the  day  time  and  dancing  and 
drinking  at  night. 

The  following  bit  of  reminiscence  from  the  pen  of  Mr.  Lindquist, 
copied  from  the  files  of  the  Fergus  Falls  Journal  of  thirty  vears  ago,  will 
prove  of  genera]  interest  to  the  readers  of  this  history:  "Together  with 
three  other  residents  of  Parkers  Prairie,  I  had  the  worst  experience  of  my 
life,  on  the  8th  and  Qth  of  January,  1873,  which  was  by  far  the  mo 
and  fatal  in  its  effects  of  am  storm  of  which  there  is  any  record  in  Minne- 
sota It  is  doubtless  desirable  to  place  in  print  such  experiences  a-  historical 
data. 

"On  the  morning  of  the  8th  of  January,  at  six  o'clock,   1'.  (  >.   Nelson, 

(I  2b) 


178  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

John  X.  Nelson,  Peter  X.  Lindquist  and  myself,  each  driving  an  ox  team 
and  sled  loaded  with  wheat,  started  from  Parkers  Prairie  for  Otter  Tail 
city,  a  distance  of  twenty-five  miles,  which  will  he  conceded  to  he  a  big  drive 
for  oxen  in  one  day.  Not  a  single  settler  lived  on  the  road.  The  weather 
was  calm,  cloudy  and  warm,  so  that  a  few  rain  drops  fell  about  daylight. 
I'he  snow  being  middling  dee])  and  the  road  hut  little  traveled,  our  progress 
was  slow. 

"Shortly  before  reaching  Last  Battle  Lake  two  men  on  foot  walked 
past  lis— also  bound  for  Otter  Tail  city  and  while  we  were  feeding  mir 
teams  at  the  east  end  of  Last  Battle  Lake.  C.  P.  Smith,  who  was  driving  his 
ox  team,  hut  without  a  load,  also  passed  us  and  with  him  were  John  Knight, 
then  a  resident  of   Parkers  Prairie  and  Otto  Buse  of  Millerville. 

"The  wind  had  changed  to  the  northwest  and  snow  began  to  fall  about 
ten  o'clock  and  in  the  afternoon  the  wind  as  well  as  the  snowfall,  increased 
in  severity  so  that  by  two  o'clock  it  was  impossible  to  see  more  than  a  few 
rods  ahead  at  any  time  and  it  grew  cold  rapidly. 

"When  we  came  to  the  edge  of  the  prairie  in  Girard  we  concluded  it 
was  suicidal  to  try  to  go  farther  and  the  oxen  could  not  he  forced  1m  go 
against  the  wind.  Resides  we  had  to  hunt  for  the  road,  as  the  track  was 
becoming  entirely  obliterated.  After  a  short  consultation  we  turned  back 
into  a  poplar  thicket. we  had  just  passed,  behind  a  low  ridge  and  immediately 
went  to  work  preparing  to  camp  out  in  what  proved  to  he  the  worst  blizzard 
before  or  since  known.  We  first  tied  our  oxen  close  together  in  the  best 
sheltered  place  we  could  find  and  covered  them  with  blankets;  then  emptying 
two  sled  boxes  of  their  sacks,  we  raised  them  on  edge  in  shape  of  an  L.  with 
the  angle  pointing  toward  the  northwest  to  break  off  the  wind  as  much  as 
possible.  Our  next  effort  was  to  kindle  a  fire  with  dry  poplar  brush.  \s 
the  cold  was  rapidly  becoming  more  intense,  and  the  snow  was  beginning  to 
fill  the  .air.  we  kept  up  a  fire  all  night.  We  made  coffee  and  ate  our  lunch. 
taking  turns  in  cutting  and  dragging  brush  for  tin-  fire.  The  next  morning 
we  decided  to  try  and  get  home  that  day  if  possible.  We  left  our  wheal 
covered  up  in  the  snow,  hitched  two  yokes  of  oxen  t>  1  empty  sleds,  and  with 
our  camping  outfit  started  for  home  about  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning. 
One  man  walked  ahead  all  the  time  to  look  for  the  road  and  avoid  drifts. 
Every  half  hour  he  would  be  relieved  and  would  crawl  into  the  sled  and 
cover  up  with  blankets.      In   this  way  each   took   his   share  of  the   hardships 


and    none    of 

is    became    entirely    exhausted.      \t    times    we    encountered 

impassable  snov 

^drifts.     Thus  we  worked  all  day  and  succeeded  in  reaching 

home  about  dai 

•k  on  the  oth.  very  much  tired  out.     The  greatest  care  had 

to  be  taken  tha 

1   no  one  should   fall  asleep,  as  with  the   intense  cold  and  our 

tired  condition 

it   would   have  proved  our  last   sleep. 

OTTEK    TAIL    COUXIV,    MINNESOTA.  J  "Q 

".Meantime,  Smith,  Knight  and  Buse  succeeded  in  reaching  a  grove  on 
the  1  tanks  of  a  creek  near  Gourd  lake  in  Girard  town  where  they  passed  a 
wretched  night  in  camp  and  readied  Otter  Tail  lake  next  day  after  receiv- 
ing assistance  from  a  couple  of  farmers  living  a  mile  or  two  south  of  Otter 
Tail.  Smith  and  his  oxen  could  go  no  further,  and  Knight  and  Buse  reached 
the  houses  of  these  settlers,  who  at  once  went  to  Smith's  relief. 

"The  five  men  who  had  passed  us  on  the  8th  reached  Otter  Tail,  anil 
nothing  was  heard  of  us  on  the  9th  or  10th.  They  supposed  that  our  party 
had  perished  and  we  were  counted  among  the  great  numher  that  were  lost 
in  that  memorable  storm,  and  such  a  statement  was  telegraphed  to  St.  I 'auk 
Parties  who  traveled  on  foot  from  Otter  Tail  to  Parkers  Prairie  two  days 
after  the  storm  was  over,  looked  carefully  by  the  way  tor  signs  of  us.  and 
they  expected  to  find  four  men  and  teams  stiff  and  half  covered  with  snow. 
They  found  our  camping  place  where  one  or  two  acres  was  completely  cleared 
of  brush  and  poplar  trees.  All  our  tracks  were  completely  covered  by  the 
hard  packed  snow.  \t  is  needless  to  say  that  when  they  found  us  all  at 
home  and  well,  their  gloomy  forebodings  were  changed  to  rejoicing." 


OLE  T.  LYSTAD. 


Ole  J.  Lystad,  a  native  of  Norway,  having  been  born  in  that  country 
011  July  6,  1848.  is  the  son  of  John  and  Alma  (Torpit)  Lystad,  both  of 
whom  were  natives  of  Norway.  The  grandfather  of  Ole  J.  Lystad,  Ole 
Lystad,  was  a  farmer  in  the  native  country,  and  here  he  lived  and  died. 
The  parents  of  Ole  J.  never  ventured  to  found  a  new  home  in  America 
but  lived  their  life  in  Norway,  where  the  father  died  in  1864  and  the  mother 
in  [873.  The  father  was  a  fanner  but  had  devoted  a  part  of  his  life  as  a 
soldier  in  the  wars  of  his  country.  They  were  the  parents  of  three  children 
Ole,   Frederick,  deceased,  and  Betsy,  who  still  resides  in  Norway. 

Ole  J.  Lystad  received  his  education  in  the  school  of  his  native  country 
and  came  to  the  United  States  as  a  young  man  and  unmarried,  in  187-'. 
He  landed  at  New  York  City  and  traveled  direct  to  Red  Wing.  Minnesota, 
where  he  remained  six  months,  working  on  a  farm.  Locating  in  Fergus 
Falls,  he  purchased  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land  on  which  a  part 
of  the  town  of  Carlisle  is  now  situated.  This  land  he  sold  after  a  short 
time  ami  in  [883  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  28,  Oscar 
township,  where  lie  now  resides,  and  where  be  owns  two  hundred  and  fifty 
acres. 

In  [886  he  built  a  new  bouse,  which  he  rebuilt  and  modernized  in 
1805.  He  built  his  large  and  well-arranged  barn  in  [892.  Mr.  Lystad  does 
general  farming  and  raises  much  stock,  although  he  is  not  interested  in 
developing    the   registered    animals   his   stock    is   all    high    grade.      He    is    tin 


l8o  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

owner  of  stock  in  the  elevator  at  Carlisle  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  its 
growth. 

In  1880  Ole  J.  Lystad  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mathea  Amundson- 
berg,  and  to  this  union  were  born  three  children,  Betsy,  Julius  and  Henry. 
Bets\  and  Julius  are  married  and  have  established  homes  of  their  own. 
The  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  in  the  work  of  which  they 
take  great  interest. 


HANS  P.  SETHRE. 


Hans  P.  Sethre,  a  native  of  Norway,  was  born  on  October  30,  1848, 
the  son  of  Peter  and  Gunhild  (  Berger)  Sethre.  The  grandfather.  Hans 
Sethre,  and  the  great-grandfather,  Elias  Sethre,  as  well  as  the  great-great- 
grandfather. Andres  Sethre,  were  all  tillers  of  the  soil  in  their  native  country. 
The  grandfather  also  owned  and  operated  a  freight  boat  on  Lake  Mjosen. 
The  families  were  all  active  and  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

Peter  Sethre  received  his  education  in  his  native  country.  He  was  a 
fanner  and  assisted  his  father  in  the  operation  of  his  freight  boat  on  Lake 
Mjosen.  In  1867,  with  his  family,  he  came  to  America  on  a  sailing  vessel 
and  after  a  voyage  lasting  from  April  1 1  to  May  2Q.  they  landed  at  Quebec. 
They  moved  at  once  to  Fillmore  county.  Minnesota,  making  the  long  journey 
by  railroad,  steam  boat  and  with  horses.  They  remained  there  for  two 
years,  the  father  working  on  a  farm  as  a  farm  hand,  and  as  a  day  laborer. 
On  May  2q,  1S69.  they  left  their  home  of  two  years  and  made  the  journey 
of  four  hundred  miles  to  Otter  Tail  county,  arriving  at  their  destination 
on  Tune  22,  of  the  same  year.  Here  they  homesteaded  one  hundred  and 
sixtv  acres  of  land  in  section  35,  Oscar  township.  Here  the  father  died  in 
1887,  the  mother  having  died  in  June.  1884.  They  were  the  parents  of  the 
following  children :  Hans  ['..  Ole  (deceased),  Julia.  Martina  (deceased), 
Christian.  Maren  and  Olef. 

Hans  P.  Sethre  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  Nor- 
way and  four  months  in  Fillmore  county.  As  a  boy  he  worked  on  the  farm 
and  when  he  came  to  Minnesota  he  freighted  west  from  Morris,  going  as 
far  as  Pembina  on  the  north.  lie  came  to  America  with  his  parents.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Hans  P.  Sethre  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Mary, 
Lora,  Peter  and  Olga,  all  of  whom  are  married.  Hans  1'.  Sethre  home- 
steaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  35,  Oscar  township, 
this  county,  and  here  he  made  his  home  until   the  spring  of    mi  5   when   he 

1 ed   to   Fergus   halls  where  he  lives  a  retired  life.      In    mt4  he   returned 

to  Norway  to  visit  relatives  and  friends.  Mr.  Sethre  had  added  to  his 
homestead  farm  until  he  had  four  hundred  acres.  The  greater  pari  of  his 
land  he  has  sold  to  his  children,   I'etcr  owning  the  home  place  of  two  bun- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  l8l 

dred  and  forty  acres.  The  land  was  all  developed  and  improved  by  Mr. 
Sethre,  the  house  being  built  in  1882  and  the  barn,  a  structure  fifty-two  by 
seventy-six  feet,  was  erected  in  1903.  He  owns  a  fine  home  in  Fergus 
Falls  in  which  he  now  lives. 

Mr.  Sethre  has  had  an  active  life  full  of  successful  efforts  and  good 
deeds.  He  has  served  as  chairman  and  treasurer  of  the  board  of  super- 
visors of  his  township,  clerk  of  the  school  district  for  twenty  years,  secre- 
tary of  the  Lutheran  church  for  years,  and  was  Federal  census  enumerator 
for  his  district  in  two  successive  decades.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Scandia 
State  Bank  at  Fergus  Falls  and  in  the  bank  at  Carlisle  also  in  the  Otter  Tail 
Power  Company  and  the  Woolen  mills. 


LARS  L.  ONSUM. 


Living  in  retirement  at  Pelican  Rapids,  the  gentleman  whose  successful 
history  is  here  briefly  presented  is  enjoying  the  result  of  his  years  of  indus- 
try and  eifort  in  the  agricultural  and  commercial  world.  He  has  for  years 
been  greatly  interested  in  the  advancement  of  the  community  in  which  he 
has  lived,  and  the  enthusiasm  aroused  by  his  activities  has  continued  as  a 
factor  in  the  prosperous  town  of  Pelican  Rapids. 

Lars  L.  Onsum,  retired  farmer,  Pelican  Rapids,  Otter  Tail  county,  was 
born  on  June  26,  1847,  m  Norway,  and  is  a  son  of  Lars  Targersen  Onsum, 
and  his  wife,  Kjerste  (Aasen)  Onsum.  His  education  was  received  at  the 
public  schools  of  his  native  land,  after  which  he  remained  under  the  parental 
roof  until  1869,  when  he  came  to  America,  stopping  about  two  and  a  half 
years  in  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota.  In  March,  1872,  he  came  to  Otter 
Tail  county,  locating  in  Pelican  township,  where  he  bought  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres,  two  miles  northwest  of  Pelican  Rapids,  on  which  he  put  all  the 
improvements.  After  thoroughly  establishing  himself  in  his  agricultural 
pursuits,  Mr.  Onsum  opened  a  furniture  store  at  Pelican  Rapids,  which  he 
operated  in  connection  with  his  farm,  until  1895,  when  he  left  the  farm 
and  moved  his  family  to  Pelican  Rapids,  where  he  has  since  resided.  About 
[898  he  sold  his  furniture  store  and  in  1899  started  a  drug  store,  which  he 
conducted  until  1903.  when  he  sold  out  to  his  partner  and  retired  from  an 
active  business  life.  Air.  Onsum  now  owns  two  hundred  acres  of  fine  farm 
land  in  Pelican  township.  Politically,  he  has  always  given  his  support  t<> 
the  Republican  party,  in  the  local  politics  of  which  he  has  taken  an  active 
part,  serving  m  the  town  council  for  two  years,  lie  is  a  member  of  the 
Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  to  which  he  contributes  liberally. 

Lars  Targersen  Onsum.  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  born 
in  Norway,  as  was  also  his  wife,  Kjerste  (Aason)  Onsum.  Mr.  Onsum 
died   before   Lars  L.    was  born.      This   union   was  blest    with   seven   children. 


IOJ  UTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

After  the  deatli  of  her  husband,  Airs.  Onsum  was  again  married,  and  became 
the  mother  of  two  children  by  her  second  husband. 

Lars  L.  Onsum  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1887,  with  Karen  Onsum, 
to  which  union  four  children  have  been  born:  Clara,  Laura.  Matilda  and 
Leopold. 

.Mr.  Onsum  is  justly  popular  in  bis  home  community,  where  he  not 
only  has  the  happy  faculty  of  winning  friends,  but  holding  them  by  his 
sterling  qualities. 


[ENS  A.  STORTROEN. 


Probably  none  of  the  leading  citizens  of  the  town  of  Dalton,  in  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota,  have  taken  a  more  honored  or  more  conspicuous 
place  in  the  public  life  and  general  affairs  of  the  community,  than  has  Jens 
\.  Stortroen,  who,  as  a  prominent  office  holder,  an  enterprising  merchant 
and  a  citizen  who  has  had  a  part  in  the  establishment  and  the  incorporation 
of  the  town  of  Dalton,  has  won  a  place  of  permanence  in  the  records  and 
history  of  the  community. 

Jens  A.  Stortroen  was  born  in  Martill,  Wisconsin,  on  July  8,  [862, 
the  son  of  Andres  and  Segre  1  Bjerken)  Stortroen,  both  of  whom  were  born 
m  Norway,  the  lather  coming  to  America  alone,  and  the  mother  coming  to 
this  country  with  her  parents.  Andres  Stortroen  was  the  son  of  Jens  ami 
Ingeborg  Stortroen,  who  were  natives  of  Norway  and  lived  in  that  country, 
where  Jens  Stortroen  was  a  farmer,  during  their  entire  lives.  Segre  Rjerken 
is  the  daughter  of  Paul  and  Segre  Bjerken,  who  were  born  in  Norway, 
came  to  America  in  the  year  1856,  and  located  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin, 
where  Paul  Bjerken  was  a  farmer,  and  where  they  both  spent  their  last 
days. 

Andres  Stortroen.  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch.,  was  educated 
in  the  public  schools  of  Norway,  afterward  coming  in  the  year  1850,  to 
America,  where  he  located  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin  ami  bought  eighty 
acres  of  land  on  which  he  lived  until  the  year  [883,  when  be  moved  to  the 
state  of  Minnesota  ami  purchased  two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Aastad  town- 
ship, this  county,  where  be  lived  until  the  year  10,00,  at  that  time  retiring 
ami  living  a  quiet  life,  until  his  death  during  the  year  igo6.  Segre.  the 
widow  of  Andres  Stortroen,  is  now  a  resident  of  Fergus  Falls,  where  she 
lives  with  her  children. 

Jens    A    Stortroen    was   educated    in    the    public    schools    of    Wisconsin. 

after   which   be    farmed    with    bis    father   and    then    bought   one   hundred   and 

sixty  acres  of  land  in    \.astad  township,  (liter    Tail  county,   Minnesota,  where 

he  engaged  in  general   farming  until  the  year   1807.  when  he  moved  t"  the 

of   Dalton,   Minnesota,  and  there  entered  the  business  as  an   implement 


OTTl'.R    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 83 

merchant  for  two  years,  after  which  time  Jens  A.  Stortroen  and  John 
Rovang  established  a  general  merchandise  store,  a  business  in  which  Mr. 
Stortroen  was  engaged  for  some  time  and  then  he  sold  his  interest  to  his 
associate.  After  this  Jens  A.  Stortroen  became  a  wheat  buyer  for  some 
time  and  for  the  next  ten  years  he  was  a  lumber  salesman,  the  last  three  of 
these  ten  years,  this  enterprising  citizen  also  conducting  a  general  merchan- 
dise store.  During  the  year  1905,  Jens  A.  Stortroen  purchased  the  gen- 
eral store  of  John  Rovang,  and  in  1913  Mr.  Stortroen  secured  the  store 
where  he  is  now  located  and  where  he  is  prosperously  engaged  as  a  general 
merchant. 

In  the  year  r.Sor  Jen-  V  Stortroen  was  married  to  Sirianna  Hansel, 
who  was  horn  in  Tumuli  township,  this  county,  and  to  this  marriage  were 
born  the  following  children:  Andres.  Albert,  Regna,  Selma,  Eliza,  Mar- 
ville.  Esther  and  Edwin,  who  is  deceased. 

Jens  A.  Stortroen  has  served  his  township  in  public  office  for  many 
years,  he  having  been  the  occupant  of  practically  all  the  offices  within  the 
gift  of  the  people.  In  the  office  as  chairman  of  the  township  board  Mr. 
Stortroen  did  many  things  for  the  progress  and  welfare  of  the  community 
and  its  life,  making  an  enviable  record  while  serving  in  this  capacity.  One 
of  the  most  notable  of  the  public  works  of  Jens  A.  Stortroen  was  Ins  effort 
and  his  aid  in  the  incorporation  of  the  town  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  during 
the  year   11)07. 

Jens  A.  Stortroen  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Norwegian 
1  utheran  church,  his  work  and  his  aid  in  support  of  the  efforts  and  prin- 
ciples of  this  church  being  well  known  in  the  congregation. 


STEFFEN  A.  HAUGER. 


Steffeii  A.  Hauger  was  bom  in  Norway  on  July  8,  1858,  the  son  of 
Andrew  and  Anna  (Hanson)  Steffenson,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
the  country.  The  grandfather,  Steffen  Anderson,  was  a  farmer  and  owned 
his   own    farm. 

\ndrew  Steffenson  received  his  education  in  Norway  and  there  grew 
to  manhood,  was  married  and  lived  the  life  of  a  farmer  till  he  came  with 
his  family  to  the  United  States  in  iSNj.  They  landed  at  Xew  York  and 
came  at  once  to  Rothsay,  where  the  father  lives  a  retired  life  with  his  Son. 
S.  A.  Hanger,  the  mother  having  been  killed  on  June  22,  [887,  by  lightning 
that  struck  the  In. use.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Steffen  A  .  Hilda  and  Hans,  who  was  drowned  in  Norway. 

Steffen  \.  Hanger  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  "i  hi-  native 
country,  where  lie  lived  until  he  was  twenty-four  years  of  age,  when  he 
came  tn    America   with   his   parents.      He   was   married   in    1887   to   Martha 


184  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Henderson,  who  was  also  born  in  Norway.  They  are  the  parents  of  the 
following  children:  Andrew,  Hannah,  Marvin,  Agnes,  Dovre,  Elmer. 
Mabel  and  Clifford.  Hannah  is  the  wife  of  Oswald  Haugen  and  they  live- 
in  Montana.     Andrew  and  Marvin  are  homesteading  in  Canada. 

In  1800  Mr.  Hauger  purchased  the  one  hundred  and  sixty  acre  farm. 
where  he  now  lives,  in  Oscar  township.  He  also  owns  twenty  acres  in 
Elizabeth  township.  The  splendid  barn  was  built  in  1006.  the  house  having 
been  erected  some  years  before,  but  since  rebuilt. 

Mr.  Hauger  practices  general  farming  and  is  a  breeder  of  Shorthorn 
cattle  and  Poland  China  hogs.  He  owns  stock  in  the  Farmers  Elevator 
Company  at  Rothsay.  Resides  his  duties  as  a  farmer  and  stock  raiser.  Mr. 
Hauger  has  been  road  overseer  for  the  past  fourteen  years. 


ANDREW  SWA'NSON. 


In  the  list  of  mason  contractors,  the  name  of  Andrew  Swanson  occu- 
pies a  place  as  one  skilled  in  his  vocation  and  in  which  he  has  become 
prominently  successful.  Air.  Swanson  has  always  possessed  that  inborn 
love  of  the  rural  district,  and  in  connection  with  his  trade,  has  acquired  a 
splendid  tract  of  land,  consisting  of  one  hundred  and  sixtv  acres,  and  which 
was  originally  the  old  Swanson  homestead. 

Andrew  Swanson.  mason  contractor,  Alexandria.  Minnesota,  was  born 
in  October.  1863.  in  Sweden,  and  is  the  son  of  Carl  and  Christina  (Ander- 
son) Swanson.  \t  the  age  of  three  years  he  came  to  America  with  his 
parents,  and  his  education  was  received  at  the  public  schools  of  Parkers 
Prairie  township.  As  a  young  man  he  began  farming  on  the  old  home 
place.  In  19O]  he  became  the 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres. 
where  he  bought  a  house,  folio 
gives  his  support  to  the  Repn 
with  the  Owl  lodge. 

(  'arl  and  Christina  1  Midi, 
where  they  followed  farming, 
once  in  Parkers  Prairie  towr 
they  were  the  oldest  of  the  pi< 
hundred  and  sixty  acres,  on  wf 
Mr.  Swanson  retired  ami  move 
and  Christina  (  Anderson  -  Sw; 
Mary.  Andrew.  Emma,  Mnaii. 
died  in   1901. 

Mr.    Swans,  mi  ha-  ne\  er  n 
his  parents  while  they  lived,  an 


.■   owner  of   tl 

le 

old  home 

stead,   consistin 

g    of 

In    r899  Mr. 

Swanson  111 

oved  to  Alexan 

dria, 

iwing  his  trac 

le  ;, 

is  a  vocal 

10,,.     Political^ 

f,  lu- 

lblican   party. 

« 

hile   In- 

fraternal    allian. 

re    i  s 

■rson  1    Swans 

-on 

were  bo 

th   born    in    Sw< 

■den. 

They  came 

to 

America 

in    [868,   scttlir 

ig    at 

iship.    Otter 

Ta 

il    county, 

Minnesota,    w 

here 

1  nicer  settlers, 

ta 

king  up 

a    homestead    of 

one 

lich  they  put 

all 

the  impn 

w  Clients.      In    1 

899, 

:d   to    MexaiK 

Iria 

The  cl 

lildren  born   to 

Carl 

anson  were: 

CI 

lristina,    1 

•".lien,   Svin,     \u 

-list. 

da   and     \nna 

Carl    and 

Christina   Swa 

llsOll 

larried,  havin 

g  1 

in.l    the   Ci 

ire  of  looking  ; 

ifter 

id  with  his  own 

busy  life, 

has  taken  but 

little 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  l8$ 

opportunity  for  his  individual  pleasure.  His  support  is  given  to  every 
movement  in  the  direction  of  material  benefit  to  his  community,  where  he 
is  highly  esteemed. 


GUNDER  REIERSON. 


Among-  those  men  of  the  town  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  who  have  made 
for  themselves  a  position  of  prominence  in  the  community,  as  a  result  of 
their  success,  not  only  in  business,  but  in  the  public  life  of  the  office  holder, 
men  who  have  given  of  their  time  and  their  abilities  for  the  general  good 
of  the  locality  and  who  as  the  result  of  long  and  good  lives  have  secured 
the  esteem  and  respect  of  their  fellow  citizens  and  associates,  is  Gunder 
Reierson,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  on  November  9,  1854,  the  son  of  Reier 
and  Ella  (Brotten)  Elingson.  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway,  who 
lived  in  that  country  until  the  year  1861,  when  they  came  to  America  and 
settled  in  Spring  Grove,  Minnesota,  where  they  lived  the  remainder  of  their 
lives,  on  a  farm  which  they  bought  on  reaching  that  locality.  Reier  and 
Ella  Elingson  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Eling,  Bertha, 
Anna,  Gunder  and  Clement. 

Gunder  Reierson  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  and  in  the  high 
school  of  Decorah,  Iowa,  after  which  he  was  a  salesman  in  a  store  for  three 
or  four  years.  In  the  year  1877  he  established  a  general  store  under  the 
name  and,  partnership  of  Haugen  &  Reierson,  where  he  remained  for  about 
four  years  and  then  sold  out  to  his  partner,  and  came  to  the  town  of  Dalton, 
Minnesota,  and  purchased  an  interest  in  the  store  and  firm  known  as  Olson 
&  Burg,  Mr.  Reierson  acquiring  the  share  of  Mr.  Burg,  and  the  company 
assuming  the  firm  name  of  Olson  &  Reierson.  Although  the  interests  in 
.this  firm  changed  hands  a  number  of  times.  Gunder  Reierson  remained  in 
the  business  until  he  is  now  the  oldest  merchant,  in  point  of  service,  in  the 
community. 

During  the  year  1875,  Gunder  Reierson  was  married  to  Lena  Nelson, 
who  was  born  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin  and  to  this  marriage  were  born 
five  children,  Ella  and  Benjamin  and  three  children  who  are  deceased. 

Gunder  Reierson,  in  public  office,  has  served  his  township  well  as  clerk 
of  the  school  district,  an  office  which  he  has  occupied  for  more  than  twenty 
years,  and  as  township  clerk  this  worthy  citizen  made  a  good  and  satis- 
factory  official.  During  the  terms  of  office  of  Presidents  Harrison  and 
Cleveland,  (hinder  Reierson  was  the  efficient  and  capable  postmaster  ol  th< 
town  <>f  Dalton,  Minnesota. 

Gunder  Reierson  and  his  wife  are  faithful  and  devoted  members  of 
the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  at  Dalton,  a  congregation  in  which  they  arc 
highlv  respected,  as  they  are  throughout  the  township  and  county. 


IOO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

JACOB  O.  HATLING. 

Vmong  those  men  who  have  been  successful  merchants  in  the  county, 

ami  who  have  now  retired  to  the  more  quiet  walks  of  life,  men  who  in  the 
past  have  served  notably  in  official  life  and  who  as  the  result  of  unselfish 
life  and  an  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  locality  have  won  an  honored  place 
in  the  ranks  of  local  citizenship,  is  Jacob  O.  Hatling,  who  was  horn  in  Nor- 
way, on  December  17.  [851,  the  sun  of  Tarl  and  [nger  (  Huse )  Olson,  both 
of  whom  were  born  in  Norway,  where  they  lived  until  the  year  [865,  and 
then  came  to  America,  locating  about  ten  miles  south  of  tin-  town  of  Decorah, 
Iowa,  where  Tarl  Olson  worked  as  a  farm  helper,  until  the  year  1867.  when 
on  July  31.  with  a  number  of  families  which  made  an  ox  wagon  train  of 
twenty  wagons,  they  moved  to  the  state  of  Minnesota  and  settled  in  St. 
Olaf  township,  of  (titer  Tail  county.  Here  .Mr.  Olson  engaged  in  farming 
as  ,1  squatter,  until  the  land  of  this  locality  was  surveyed  by  United  States 
government  officials,  and  then  he  homesteaded  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  where  he  lived  for  some  time  and  then  -old  his  land  and  moved 
to  the  town  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  there  establishing,  about  the  year  [879, 
a  general  -tore  in  which  business  he  continued  until  he  retired  from  active 
life;  the  first  six  months  of  his  business  career  he  being  in  partnership  with 
K.  II.  Brandvold,  then  a  prominent  business  man  of  (titer  Tail  county. 
Tarl  and  Fnger  Olson  were  the  parents  of  three  children,  who  grew  to 
maturity.  J.  Q.  Hatling,  the  subject  of  this  -ketch.  Ole  Rambeck  and  Henry 
\nton.  Tarl  Olson  was  one  of  the  well-known  men  of  Dalton  and  the 
community,  a  man  who  took  an  interest  in  public  affairs  and  one  who.  as  a 
member  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  was  appreciated  for  his  good 
life  ami   for  hi-  support  of  the  efforts  of  this  congregation. 

Jacob  0.  Hatling,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  received  his  education  in 
the  schools  of  \orwa\  and  for  a  short  time  attended  classes  in  the  public 
schools  of  this  country,  after  which  he  was  engaged  as  a  farmer  for  some 
vears,  in  St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  was  the  owner  of 
a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixt)  acres,  which  he  cultivated  until  the  year 
r886.  when  he  disposed  of  his  land  and  associated  himself  in  business  with 
his  father  as  a  general  merchant.  Later,  with  his  father  and  Peter  Strom- 
stad,  Jacob  (  ).  Hatling  purchased  a  stock  of  hardware,  and  this  linn  con- 
tinued in  business  for  some  time  when  Mr.  Stromstad  retired  and  his  inter- 
est was  acquired  by  J-  ( *.  Hatling  and  his  father,  the  senior  member  of  the 
company.  After  a  period  of  enterprising  business.  Mr.  Hatling  and  his 
father  enlarged  the  scope  of  their  business  activity  b}  the  erection  of  a  new 
addition  to  their  original  store,  a  room  in  which  they  engaged  as  hardware 
dealers,    for  some  years  and   then   Tarl   Olson    retired    from   business,   and   a 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  187 

brother  of  Jacob  O.  Hatling  entered  the  firm,  the  brother  operating  the  gen- 
eral merchandise  store  and  J.  0.  continuing  in  the  conduct  of  the  hardware 
stock  until  the  year  [907,  when  lie  sold  bis  share  and  retired  to  the  town  of 
Dalton,  where  he  now  lives. 

On  June  28,  1871.  Jacob  O.  Hatling  was  married  to  Gusta  Meldahl, 
who  was  born  in  Norway,  later  corning  to  America  with  her  parents.  To 
the  marriage  of  Jacob  and  Gusta  Hatling  were  born  the  following  children: 
Ole,  Lewis,  Emma,  George,  Noble,  Julia,  May  and  Arthur. 

Jacob  O.  Hatling  has  been  a  conspicuous  figure  in  the  public  life  of 
Dalton  and  of  Tumuli  township,  he  having  served  the  community  in  nearly 
every  township  office,  his  first  office  being  that  of  township  clerk,  to  which 
he  was  elected  when  twenty-one  years  of  age.  In  all  matters  for  the  pro- 
motion or  advancement  of  conditions  in  Otter  Tail  county.  J.  O.  Hatling 
is  a  leader,  the  results  of  whose  efforts  is  a  better  and  more  prosperous 
locality. 


SPENCER  FOLKEDAL. 


few  citizens  of  Dalton  and  of  Otter  Tail  county  have  been  more  prom- 
inently connected,  or  have  been  honored  by  the  people  of  the  locality  in 
more  ways  than  lias  Spencer  Folkedal,  the  well-known  and  popular  post- 
master of  Dalton.  Minnesota.  A  man  of  thorough  culture,  a  citizen  of 
unusual  intellectual  attainments  and  achievements,  and  one  who  with  broad 
and  valued  experience  in  life  has  proved  to  be  a  notable  and  appreciated 
addition  to  the  life  and  activities  in  the  business  and  public  circles  of  Otter 
Fail  county.  Minnesota,  no  review  of  lite  or  events  in  the  count)  would 
lie  complete  without  reference'  1"  the  works  and  accomplishments  of  this 
man. 

Spencer  Folkedal  was  born  in  Medo,  Blue  Earth  county.  Minnesota, 
on  August  jo.  1N75.  die  son  of  1..  S.  and  Mattie  (Munden)  folkedal.  both 
of  whom  were  born  in  Norway,  wdiere  they  lived  until  the  year  1854.  when 
L.  S.  Folkedal  came  to  America  and  located  in  Combridge  township,  Dane 
county,  Wisconsin  where  lie  worked  on  a  farm  ami  111  a  pinery.  In  1859 
1..  S.  Folkedal  Marled  for  the  Pacific  ("oast  with  a  party  of  gold  seekers, 
The)  went  as  far  as  the  Pike's  Peak  region,  Colorado,  and  at  thai  time 
Denver  was  only  a  village.  Not  being  pleased  with  the  outlook  for  gold 
mining  the  prospectors  returned  to  Wisconsin.  Later  Mr.  Folkedal  moved 
to  Winneshiek  county,  Iowa,  where  lie  remained  for  a  short  time,  and  in 
the  year  1N7.1  he  came  t <  >  Minnesota,  :n<t\  located  mi  Medo  township,  Blue 
Earth  county,  where  he  bought  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  of  land  on  which  he 
lived  for  twenty-four  years,  acquiring  during  that  time  two  hundred  acres, 
which  he  improved  and  cultivated. 


IOO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

After  this  time  L.  S.  Folkedal  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  and  bought 
one  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Tumuli  township,  where  he  lived  for  some 
years  and  then  retired  to  the  town  of  Dalton,  where  he  now  lives. 

L.  S.  Folkedal  was  married  to  Mattie  Munden,  daughter  of  Gitle 
Munden  and  wife  who  were  natives  of  Norway,  in  which  country  they  died. 

Spencer  Folkedal  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Blue  Earth 
county  and  at  1 'ark  Region  College,  after  which  he  engaged  for  about  five 
years  in  the  profession  of  a  newspaper  man  at  Fergus  Falls,  later  becoming 
a  farmer  on  his  father's  place  for  about  four  years  and  then,  in  the  year 
1905,  he  moved  to  the  town  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  and  established  himself 
in  business  as  a  dealer  in  farm  implements,  which  business  he  now  follows. 
On  .March  4,  [914,  Spencer  Folkedal  was  honored  by  his  appointment  to  the 
office  of  postmaster  of  Dalton,  Minnesota,  an  office  which  he  is  now  serving 
with  dignity  and  with  recognized  ability.  Tn  public  life  Mr.  Folkedal  has 
been  a  prominent  figure,  he  having  been  elected  to  the  office  of  township 
clerk  where  he  served  two  years  and  for  three  years  he  was  school  treasurer. 
In  political  affiliation  Spencer  Folkedal  is  of  the  Democratic  party. 

On  June  15,  1903,  Spencer  Folkedal  was  married  to  Anna  Torgerson 
and  to  this  marriage  were  born  two  children,   Julian  and  Adrian. 


KNUTE  STENERSON. 


An  opportunity  is  here  afforded  for  the  perusal  of  the  record  of  one 
of  the  prominent  and  influential  business  men  of  Pelican  Rapids.  Mr. 
Stenerson  enjoys  distinctive  prestige  as  having  achieved  wealth,  without 
even  a  dollar  at  the  start  as  a  working  basis. 

Knute  Stenerson.  lumberman,  Pelican  Rapids,  Otter  Tail  county,  was 
born  cm  February  iq,  1862.  in  Norway.  Tie  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools  of  Norway,  emigrating  to  Wisconsin  in  1887,  where  he  spent  one 
year.  In  1888  he  came  to  Pelican  Rapids.  Otter  Tail  county,  and  for  the 
first  two  years  worked  as  a  day  laborer.  Tn  1890  he  engaged  in  the  lumber 
business  with  his  brothers,  four  of  whom  came  to  America.  Tn  [913, 
Guncler  and  Knute  bought  out  the  elder  brother,  and  now  handle  all  kinds 
of  building  supplies,  under  the  firm  name  of  Stenerson  Brothers  T.um1>er 
Company,  the  lm>ihcr-  owning  the  controlling  stock  in  the  company,  as  well 
as  four  other  yards.  Politically,  Mr.  Stenerson  is  a  stanch  Republican, 
while  religiously,  he  belongs  to  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  and  is  an 
all  around,  wide-awake  business  man.  lie  owns  considerable  stock  in  the 
hirst  National  Bank  of  Pelican  Rapids,  and  is  vice-president  and  director 
in   the    \rhard   State   Bank. 

Ingeinunt  Stenerson.  father  of  the  subjeel  of  this  sketch,  was  horn  in 
Norwav,  as  was  also  his  wife.      Tie   was  a   saving,   industrious   fanner,   and 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1  Si  j 

lived  and  died  in  Norway,  where  he  reared  his  family  of  seven  children, 
four  of  whom  came  to  America. 

Knute  Stenerson  was  united  in  marriage,  in  1893,  with  Lina  Stein. 
The}-  have  an  adopted  daughter,  Mollie,  who  became  the  wife  of  Carl 
Clausen. 

Mr.  Stenerson  has  long  enjoyed  the  undivided  respect  of  a  large  circle 
of  sincere  friends  and  acquaintances  in  Otter  Tail  county,  and  as  one  of 
the  prosperous  and  representative  men  of  his  town,  merits  representation 
in  a  history  of  the  county. 


CHRISTIAN  C.  KNUDSON. 

One  of  the  best-known  farmers  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  of  Aastad 
township,  a  man  who  has  been  peculiarly  successful  as  a  farmer,  and  one 
who  as  a  citizen  has  so  conducted  himself  as  to  win  the  respect  and  esteem 
of  the  community  is  Christian  C.  Knudson.  Public  spirited,  far  seeing,  and 
of  nature  and  training  to  soon  become  an  important  part  of  the  locality 
of  his  residence,  he  has  proved  to  be  one  of  those  men  without  whom  the 
county  and  township  would  be  less  advanced  and  less  progressive. 

Christian  C.  Knudson  was  born  in  Norway,  February  15.  1869,  the  son 
of  Christian  and  Engebor  (Ostrus)  Knudson,  who  were  born  in  Norway 
and  lived  in  that  country  until  the  year  1872,  when  they  came  to  America 
and  located  in  Webster  county,  Iowa,  where  they  rented  a  farm  on  which 
they  lived  for  some  time  and  then  bought  the  place  where  they  made  their 
home  for  the  next  eighteen  years.  Later  they  moved  to  Palo  Alto  county, 
Iowa,  where  Christian  Knudson,  Sr.,  purchased  three  hundred  and  twenty 
acres  of  land  which  he  now  owns,  though  he  and  his  wife  live  in  retirement 
at  the  town  of  Emmittsburg,  Palo  Alto  county,  Iowa.  To  the  marriage 
of  Christian  and  Engebor  Knudson  were  born  the  following  children: 
Christian,  the  subject  of  this  sketch:  Anna,  Carrie,  Thomas,  Carl,  Herbert. 
Hannah,  Oscar,  Ida,   Emma  and  F.lmer. 

Christian  Knudson,  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  is  the  son  of 
Kiuult  and  Ann  Moon,  who  wire  natives  of  Norway,  a  country  where  Knudt 
Mm,  hi  -pent  his  entire  life.  After  his  death  his  wife,  Ann,  came  to  America 
with  a  si .11,  some  time  after  Christian  Knudson.  Sr..  had  emigrated  to  this 
country.  On  reaching  America  Ann  Moon,  with  her  sun,  loe.iti.-il  in  Web- 
ster county,   Iowa,   where  she  died   some  time  later. 

Engebor  Knudson,  mother  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  is  the  daugh- 
ter of  Tolev  and  Christian  <  )strus,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Norway,  in 
which  country  thej  made  their  home  until  the  year  1877,  when  the)  came 
to  America  and  settled  in  Webster  county.  Iowa,  where  Tolev  Ostrus  was 
engaged   in   general    farming  until  his  death.     Christina   Ostrus,    following 


]()()  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

the  death  of  her  husband,  went  to  the  state  of  Smith  Dakota,  in  which  state 
she  died. 

Christian  Knudson,  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  married  to 
Christina  Ostrus,  who  was  the  mother  of  one  son,  Knud.  who  died  at  the 
age  of  twenty-four  years,  while  a  resident  of  the  state  of  Michigan.  Shortly 
following  the  birth  of  her  son,  Christina  (Ostrus)  Knudson  died,  and  after 
some  time  Christian  Knudson  was  married  to  a  sister  of  his  deceased  wife. 

Christian  C.  Knudson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Webster 
county,  Iowa,  after  which  he  farmed  for  one  year  in  that  locality  and  then 
went  tn  Palo  \ltn  county,  Iowa,  where  he  rented  a  farm  until  the  year 
[912,  at  which  time  he  bought  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land  in 
Aastad  township,  a  place  where  he  has  since  lived. 

<  )ii  April  22,  [896,  Christian  C.  Knudson  was  married  to  Jennie  Jacob- 
son,  who  was  horn  in  Marshall  county,  Iowa,  October  14,  [879,  the  daugh- 
ter of  Serenius  H.  Tacobson  and  wife,  who  were  natives  of  Norway.  To 
the  marriage  of  Christian  and  Jennie  Knudson  were  horn  the  following 
children:  Clarence.  Silas,  (lava,  Cornelia,  Charlotte.  Alice,  Kilridge,  Thresa, 
(  Tester  and  Hjelrner. 

Christian  C.  Knudson  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  church,  in  which 
congregation  he  takes  an  active  part  in  the  work  and  where  he  is  among  the 
most  .appreciated  communicants. 

In  all  works  or  movements  for  the  general  welfare  of  the  tanner,  or 
for  the  various  walks  of  life  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Christian  C.  Knudson 
is  a  force  in  the  direction  of  progress  and  is  one  of  the  important  elements 
of  citizenship  in  the  community. 


AM  CXI)  JOHNSON. 


One  of  the  most  successful  farmers  and  a  heavy  landowner  of  Otter 
Tail  county,  a  man  who  from  a  modest  beginning  has  grown  to  be  prominent 
m  the  ranks  of  agricultural  life  and  a  man  who  as  a  citizen  has  taken  no 
small  pari  in  the  advancement  of  the  community  and  the  development  of  it- 
resources,  is  Amund  Johnson,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  who  was  born  111 
Norway,  October  11.  1859,  the  son  of  John  Gunderson  and  Ingeborg 
(Runigenj    Ler,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of   Norway. 

Following  his  marriage  in  the  land  of  his  birth.  John  Gunderson  with 
his  wife,  during  the  year  [868,  came  to  America,  and  located  at  Jefferson 
Prairie,  Wisconsin,  where  he  was  engaged  as  a  farmer  for  the  remainder  of 
his  life.  His  wife.  Ingeborg,  survives  her  husband  and  now  lives  near  the 
<it\  of  Milwaukee.  Wisconsin.  To  the  marriage  of  John  Gunderson  and 
hi-  wife  [ngeborg,  were  born  the  following  children:  (hinder,  who  lives 
in   the   Mate  of    South    Dakota:    Amund.   the   subject    of   this   sketch:    Martin. 


OTTER     I  All,    (  OUNTY,     Ml  \  NESOl   \.  I()r 

who  lives  in  Grant  county,  Minnesota,  and  Guilder,  who  lives  near  .Mil- 
waukee.  Wisconsin. 

Amund  Johnson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  state  oi 
Wisconsin,  after  which  he  winked  for  some  time  at  general  farm  work,  and 
then  he  went  to  Pelican  Lake.  Grant  county,  .Minnesota,  about  the  year  [877, 
working  on  the  farms  of  that  region  for  the  greater  part  of  two  years,  and 
then  he  went  to  the  state  of  South  Dakota,  and  pre-empted  land,  which 
after  two  years  he  sold  and  moved  to  Ashby,  Grant  county.  Minnesota, 
where  he  farmed  for  three  years,  and  followed  the  butcher  business  at  the 
town  of  Ashby  for  six  years. 

During  the  year  1892,  Amund  Johnson  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  land  in  Aastad  township,  a  place  which  on  taking  possession  he 
found  uncleared  and  unbroken,  but  which  this  progressive  farmer  soon  con- 
verted into  a  modern  farm  with  good  buildings,  and  which  now  is  in  a  high 
state  of  cultivation.  Mr.  Johnson  now  owns  four  hundred  acres  of  first- 
class  land  in  Otter  Tail  count),  all  of  which  is  well  cared  for  and  improved 
with  necessary  buildings  and  equipment. 

Amund  Johnson,  during  the  year  1882,  was  married  to  Lena  Johnson 
who  is  the  daughter  of  Lage  Johnson  and  wife,  natives  of  Norway.  To 
the  marriage  of  Amund  and  Lena  Johnson  have  been  born  the  following 
children  :     Lage,  Gerhard,  Nora  and   Myrtle. 

Amund  Johnson  has  been  a  good  citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county,  serving 
his  township  at  one  time  on  the  township  board  and  at  all  times  being  will- 
ing to  aid  in  all  moves  for  the  advancement  of  local  interests.  In  religious 
affiliation    \mund  Tohnson  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 


ANDREW   PETERSON. 


skc 


It  has  been  truly  said  that  "It  is  not  by  sleeping,  but  by  working,  wak- 
g  and  laboring  continually,  that  proficiency  is  attained  and  reputation 
quired."  Were  this  test  to  be  applied  to  him  whose  life  record  is  brief!) 
led  here,  lie  might  be  considered  an  exemplification  for  the  statement, 
for  from  hi-  early  manhood,  ambition,  industry  and  honesty  have  been 
marked  characteristics.  \ndrew  Peterson,  for  thirty-three  years,  a  rest 
dent  of  Pelican  Rapids,  is  a  native  of  Sweden,  having  been  born  there  on 
September  22,  [853.  lie  is  the  son  of  Peter  and  Christine  (Haugland) 
Arinson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden,  where  they  spent  their  entire 
lives,  Mr.  Peterson  operated  a  foundry.  Their  children  were  ten  in  num- 
ber, three  of  whom  are  dead,  and  one  of  these  was  named  Sabina.  The 
others  are  Orin,   Eva,  John.  Aleas,   Eric,  Carl  and   Andrew. 

Andrew    attended    school    111    Sweden    and    also    became    proficient    there 
in  the  carpenter's  trade.     In    \pril.    r88o,   be  immigrated  to    America  and 


192  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;     MINNESOTA. 

followed  his  trade  first  in  Ishpeming,  Michigan.  He  later  followed  the 
same  trade  in  Chicago,  Wisconsin  and  Fergus  Falls.  From  the  latter  place 
he  removed  to  Pelican  Rapids  in  [882.  As  the  railroad  was  then  in  con- 
struction he  rode  only  as  far  as  its  terminus  and  was  compelled  to  walk  the 
rest  of  the  way,  a  distance  of  two  miles.  Here  he  was  a  carpenter  for  many 
years,  in  fact  until  he  went  into  the  furniture  and  undertaking  business 
about  the  year  [895.  lie  has  succeded  in  this  undertaking  and  today  is  well 
known  in  his  present  line  of  work. 

Rockel  Norhan  became  Mrs.  Andrew  Peterson  in  [888.  Although  a 
native  of  Norway,  she  was  then  living  in  Pelican  Rapids  with  her  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ole  Norhan,  who  afterward  took  up  a  homestead  claim  in 
North  Dakota.  The  children  horn  of  this  union  are  five  in  number,  namely: 
Inger  Christinia,  Oscar  P.,  Alma  Christinia.  Carl  Johan  and  Ruth  Meria. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Peterson  are  devoted  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  to 
which  they  have  been  generous  both  with  their  time  and  means. 

With  faith  in  himself  and  in  the  universal  good,  Mr.  Peterson  has 
made  his  life  one  of  influence  and  usefulness,  and  has  had  the  reward  of 
knowing  that  he  has  made  many  warm  friends  in  this  locality. 


WILLIAM    LINCOLN. 


The  Lincoln  family  have  been  prominent  in  the  official  life  of  Otter 
Tail  county  for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century.  William  Lincoln,  the 
well-known  auditor  of  Otter  Tail  county,  who  succeeded  his  father  to  this 
office,  not  only  is  well  known  in  the  political  life  of  the  county,  but  is  a 
highly  respected  citizen  in  private  circles. 

William  Lincoln  is  a  native  of  Albert  Lee,  Minnesota,  where  he  was 
born  on  May  23,  1 S77.  a  son  of  William  C.  and  Elizabeth  (Gates)  Lincoln, 
the  former  of  whom  was  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  for  some  time, 
and  later  in  clerical  work.  He  served  seventeen  years  as  a  deputy  in  vari- 
ous county  office-,  and  was  nine  years  auditor  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

In  the  spring  of  [882  the  Lincoln  I'aniiK  removed  to  Fergus  Fails,  and 
it  was  there  that  William  Lincoln  received  his  early  education.  He  was 
graduated  from  the  Fergus  Falls  high  school,  after  which  he  was  employed 
on  Wheelock's  Weekly  for  three  years.  He  then  became  a  clerk  in  the 
office  of  the  count)  auditor,  under  his  father,  William  C.  Lincoln,  and  on 
February  29,  [908,  was  appointed  county  auditor  to  fill  out  the  unexpired 
term  of  his  father,  whose  untimely  death  occurred  in  that  month.  In  the 
fall  of  1908,  .Mr.  Lincoln  was  triumphantly  elected  to  the  office  which  his 
lather  had  so  capably  filled,  and  to  which  he  had  succeeded  after  his  father's 
death,  lie  was  again  elected  in  [910,  and  was  re-elected  in  [912  and  in 
mi  l,       Altogether  lie  has  filled  the  office  of  count}'  auditor  a  little  more  than 


WII.I.IAM  C.   LINCOLN. 


WII.i.ia.M   LINCOLN. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I93 

eight  years,  and  has  given  to  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county  not  only  con- 
scientious, but  efficient  service. 

In  1903  William  Lincoln  was  married  to  Perle  Czeskleba,  and  to  this 
union  have  ben  born  four  children,  Mildred,  William  C,  Helen  Leone  and 
Donald. 


JOHN  ERIKSON. 


On  that  roll  of  honored  citizens,  the  memory  of  whom  the  people  of 
Otter  Tail  county  delight  in  perpetuating,  is  the  name  of  John  Erikson, 
who  as  a  good  citizen  in  the  community  in  the  more  commonplace  life,  as 
well  as  having  been  a  valued  citizen  of  the  nation,  who  in  the  days  of  the 
great  Rebellion  served  through  the  perils  of  the  most  severe  days  of  the 
most  extensive  campaigns,  has  won  for  himself  a  place  in  the  hearts  of  his 
countrymen  that  will  not  soon  be  effaced.  Successful  as  a  farmer,  efficient 
in  business,  public  spirited  as  a  citizen  and  forceful  of  personality  as  a  man, 
his  death  was  a  distinct  loss  to  the  county. 

John  Erikson  was  born  in  Norway.  November  14,  1843,  tne  son  °f 
Erik  and  Berit  ("Johnson)  Helgeson,  who  were  natives  of  Norway,  where 
they  lived  until  the  war  1852,  when  they  came  to  America  and  located  in 
Racine  county,  Wisconsin,  where  they  lived  for  some  time  and  then  went  to 
Goodhue  count}-.  Minnesota,  where  Erik  Helgeson  bought  eighty  acres  of 
land,  on  which  he  put  extensive  improvements,  and  where  he  lived  for  the 
remainder  of  his  life.  Erik  and  Berit  (Johnson)  Helgeson  were  the  parents 
of  seven  children. 

John  Erikson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  state  of  Wis- 
consin and  Minnesota,  after  which  he  worked  for  some  time  at  general  farm 
employment.  During  the  year  1865  John  Erikson  enlisted  for  service  with 
Company  E,  Eleventh  Regiment,  Minnesota  Volunteer  Infantry,  in  thej 
( 'nil  War,  serving  until  the  close  of  the  war,  during  which  time  he  was  a 
sufferer  with  typhoid   fever  contracted   while  on  duty. 

Some  time  after  leaving  the  service  of  his  country  John  Erikson  came 
to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  of  land  in  Aastad  township,  establishing  a  home  here,  where 
he  lived  for  the  remainder  of  his  life.  After  improving  his  original  farm 
until  it  was  in  first-class  condition,  John  Erikson,  added  by  purchase  forty 
acres  adjoining  and  at  another  time  bought  thirty-eight  acres  of  timber 
land,  nn  all  of  which  that  enterprising  farmer  placed  a  number  of  improve- 
ments. 

(  )n  October  10,  [868,  John  Erikson  was  married  to  Berit  Boeye,  who 
was  a  native  of  Norway,  the  daughter  of  Boeye  Almunson  and  Berh  <  )stend- 
I  r3b) 


IQ4  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

son,  who  came  to  America  in  the  year  1864,  going  to  the  state  of  Iowa, 
where  they  remained  two  weeks  and  then  coming  to  the  state  of  Minnesota, 
where  they  established  a  home  in  Goodhue  county,  where  they  lived  for  the 
remainder  of  their  lives,  lierit,  the  wife  of  John  Erikson,  is  one  of  four 
children.  To  the  marriage  of  John  and  Berit  Erikson  were  horn  the  fol- 
lowing children:  Erik.  Osten,  Henry.  Berit,  John,  Berner  and  Anna.  Of 
these  children,  Henry  lives  on  the  home  farm. 

John  Erikson  was  a  faithful  and  devout  memher  of  the  Norwegian 
Lutheran  church,  giving  freely  of  his  time  and  his  interests  for  the  promo- 
tion of  the  welfare  of  that  organization.  John  Erikson  was  a  good  man. 
a  kind  father  and  loving  husband,  and  a  man  and  citizen  of  whom,  and  of 
whose  record,  the  people  of  Aastad  township  are  justly  appreciative. 

John  Erikson  died  on  September  4,  1895,  mourned  by  hosts  of  friends 
and   fellow  citizens. 


JOHN  M.  JOHNSON. 


John  M.  Johnson,  as  present  mayor  of  Pelican  Rapids,  as  well  as  the 
first  settler  of  Pelican  township,  is  deserving  of  more  than  casual  mention 
in  the  present  publication.  A  resident  of  this  township  for  forty-six  years, 
his  life  and  character  have  had  a  strong  influence  upon  the  community  in 
which  he  has  been  a  leader.  Mr.  Johnson,  who  was  born  in  Sweden  on 
April  6.  [843,  came  to  this  country  when  he  was  twenty-three  years  of  age. 
He  is  the  son  of  John  and  Johanna  (Ness)  Johnson,  both  of  whom  were 
horn  in  his  native  land. 

Mrs.  Johnson  died  when  the  subjeel  of  this  sketch  was  a  lad  of  five 
years  and  her  husband  came  to  America  in  [869  and  made  his  home  with 
bis  son.  John,  until  he  was  over  ninety  years  of  age.  In  Sweden  he  was 
engaged  in  the  farming  industry  and  served  in  the  Swedish  army.  The  chil- 
dren of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Johnson  are  John  M.  whose  life  history  is  here  pre- 
sented; Alese,  who  died  in  this  country,  and  [nger,  a  resident  of  Detroit, 
Michigan. 

After  receiving  his  education  in  his  native  country,  John  Johnson 
farmed  there  and  in  Norway,  to  which  country  he  went  in  [863.  Three 
years  later  he  came  to  the  Tinted  States  and  located  in  White  Water.  Wis- 
consin, but  the  same  year  he  became  a  citizen  of  Winship  county,  Iowa. 
Returning  to  Wisconsin,  he  worked  in  the  pineries  for  Knapp,  Stout  &  Com- 
pany, one  of  the  largest  lumber  companies  in  the  state.  In  the  spring  of 
[869  he  braved  the  wilderness  of  the  north  and  became  the  first  settler  of 
what  is  now  known  as  Pelican  township.  As  ,1  "squatter"  he  pre-empted 
the  land  and  later  homesteaded  and  has  now  made  this  tract  one  of  the 
mosl    productive    farms  in   the  county.      It    is  three  hundred   and   sixty  acres 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I95 

in  extent  and  to  this  estate  may  be  added  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres 
which  he  owns  in  Canada.  On  this  homestead,  where  besides  farming  he- 
raised  Guernsey  cattle,  he  lived  until  1910  when  he  built  a  home  in  Pelican 
Rapids. 

While  Mr.  Johnson  was  the  first  pioneer  to  brave  life  in  Pelican  town- 
ship, three  other  families  came  to  this  county  at  the  same  time  and  located 
in  Norwegian  Grove  township.  Mr.  Johnson  was  at  this  time  unmarried. 
With  the  four  families  that  traveled  together  he  camped  the  first  night 
(Thursday)  on  the  west  bank  of  Prairie  lake.  Their  peaceful  slumbers 
were  disturbed  by  the  stealthy  tread  of  eight  Indian  braves.  Fortunately, 
Mr.  Johnson  had  learned  to  talk  Chippewa  during  his  service  as  cook  in 
the  northern  pineries,  and  also  when  he  took  part  in  government  surveys 
at  J.e\  ern,  Minnesota,  and  along  the  South  Dakota  line  and  when  he  worked 
along  Red  river.  So  he  acted  as  spokesman  for  the  little  group  of  fright- 
ened pioneers,  and  a  council  was  held  at  which  it  was  agreed  that  the  whites 
should  farm  and  the  Indians  should  be  allowed  to  hunt  and  that  they  would 
he  friendly  in  their  relations. 

On  Saturday  night  of  the  same  week,  while  Mr.  Johnson  was  away, 
the  women  of  the  camping  party  were  terrorized  by  seeing  ten  Indians 
scantily  clad  approaching  the  camp  The  women  fled  panic-stricken  to  the 
woods,  but  the  Indians  made  no  further  attempt  to  enter  the  camp.  The 
fright  of  this  event,  however,  caused  the  four  families  to  pack  up  their  few 
household  goods  and  to  move  westward  within  the  present  boundaries  of 
Norwegian  Grove  township.  Some  time  after  ihis  episode  Mr.  Johnson 
inquired  of  the  Indians  why  they  had  molested  the  camp  after  their  agree- 
ment to  be  peaceful.  The  red  men  were  surprised  at  the  question  and  said 
that  they  wanted  only  to  trade  some  game  for  cornmeal.  Mr.  Johnson  then 
explained  to  them  that  in  their  almost  undressed  condition,  they  had  fright- 
ened the  settlers  away.  There  was  no  further  interruption  to  the  peace  of 
the  campers  though   they   still   insisted   upon  moving  away. 

Myra  Berg  became  the  wife  of  Mr.  Johnson  in  1873.  She  was  born 
in  Norway  ami  is  the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hans  Berg.  Her  father 
came  to  America  and  made  his  home  with  Air.  and  Mrs.  Johnson  until  his 
death  at  the  age  of  ninety-four.  The  children  boru  in  this  household  arc 
H.  M.,  a  physician  of  Dawson,  Minnesota;  Matilda,  the  deceased  wife  of 
Otto  Crookstad;  Caroline,  who  is  Mrs.  Adolph  Arneson,  of  Pelican  town 
ship ;  Alga,  who  lives  at  home;  Emma,  who  is  Mrs.  Oscar  Sillerod.  of  Peli- 
can township;  Carl  ML.,  a  physician  living  at  Montevideo.  Minnesota.  The 
Johnson  family  are  members  of  the  United  Lutheran  church.  Mrs.  John- 
son died  on  June   15.    I Q I  3 . 

Mr.    Johnson,   besides  having    farming   interests,    is  a   director   of   the 


It)6  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

First  National  Bank.  For  fifteen  years,  he  was  on  the  board  of  township 
trustees  and  was  chairman  most  of  the  time,  and  has  held  other  offices.  In 
the  spring  of  1915  he  was  elected  mayor  of  the  village.  John  M.  Johnson 
is  a  progressive  farmer,  a  loyal  citizen,  a  true  friend,  a  devoted  husband 
and   father,  and  a  man  of  generous  impulses  and  unimpeachable  character. 


LOUIS  ARNOLD. 


Louis  Arnold,  a  successful  farmer  of  Aurdal  township,  is  a  native  of 
Sweden,  where  he  was  burn  on  January  12,  1858.  Air.  Arnold  is  the  son  of 
John  and  Maja  (Olson)  Larson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden  and 
who  spent  their  entire  lives  in  their  native  country. 

Louis  Arnold  was  educated  in  his  native  land,  and  in  1878  came  to 
America  and  settled  at  St.  Peter,  Minnesota.  Four  years  later  he  emi- 
grated to  Otter  Tail  county  and  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land  from  his 
father-in-law,  <  >sul  Halverson.  When  Mr.  Arnold  obtained  possession  of 
this  farm  there  were  only  ten  acres  cleared.  He  has  been  compelled  to 
clear  the  land  and  to  fence  it. 

On  September  24,  1882,  Louis  Arnold  was  married  to  Osena  Halver- 
son, who  was  born  in  Norway  on  November  4.  i860.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arnold 
have  no  children.  Mrs.  Arnold's  father,  Osul  Halverson,  was  born  in  Nor- 
way in  1827.  His  wife,  who  before  her  marriage  was  Anne  Torgusdaugh- 
ter,  was  born  in  Norway  in  1832  and  moved  to  Rice  county,  Minnesota,  in 
1862.  Two  of  Mrs.  Arnold's  maternal  uncles,  Ashley  and  Torgus  Torgen- 
son,  served  in  the  Civil  War.  In  1870  Mrs.  Arnold's  father  and  mother 
came  to  Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  count}',  Minnesota,  and  homesteaded 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  where  Air.  and  Airs.  Arnold  now  live. 
Later  they  purchased  one  hundred  and  ten  acres  east  of  the  first  tract. 
They  were  the  parents  of  eight  children:  Helena  and  Hans  died  in  infancy; 
Torena  and  Torgus  died  in  this  country.  The  living  children  are  (  >sena, 
who  is  now   Airs.    Arnold:  Jacob.  TIalver  and   Mary. 

Mrs.  Arnold's  mother  was  the  daughter  of  Torgus  and  Ose  Olson,  who 
wen-  born  in  Norway  and  who,  in  1856,  emigrated  to  Rice  county,  Minne- 
sota, an<I  purchased  fortj  acres  of  school  land.  They  spent  their  last  days 
in  Rice  county.  They  had  a  family  of  six  children,  of  whom  (Me.  Bertha, 
Gunder  and  Anne  are  deceased.  Ashley  is  now  living  in  Aurdal  township, 
Otter  Tail  county.  He  was  born  in  Norway  on  July  29,  [837,  and  moved 
to  Rice  county,  Minnesota,  with  his  parents,  lie  attended  a  writing  school 
at  Faribault,  Minnesota,  and.  in  1869,  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty 
of  land  iii  this  county.  Later  he  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  where  he  now  lives.  He  has  held  most  of  the  township  offices  and 
served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil   War.      By  his  marriage  to  Anne   Johnson, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  I97 

who  was  born  in  Norway  in  1852  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Andrew  and 
Sarena  Anderson,  pioneer  settlers  of  Rice  county,  there  were  born  four 
children,  Marie,  Thomas,  Sarah  and  Arthur.  Mrs.  Ashley  Torgerson  died 
in  1892.  Torgus,  the  sixth  child,  is  a  farmer  in  Aurdal  township  and  was 
a  soldier  in  the  Civil  War. 

Air.  and  Mrs.  Louis  Arnold  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church.     Mr. 
Arnold  is  now  clerk  of  the  school  board. 


rOHN  LYNG,  M.  D. 


One  of  the  most  prominent  men  in  Otter  Tail  county,  not  only  in  his 
professional  capacity  as  a  physician,  but  as  a  man  of  high  intellectual  attain- 
ments and  strong  personality,  is  Dr.  John  Lyng.  He  has  always  exemplified 
the  highest  ethical  code  of  his  chosen  profession  and  his  technical  knowledge 
and  skill  are  such  as  to  give  him  a  place  among  the  representatives  of  his 
vocation  in  the  state.  Not  content  with  merely  doing  his  duty  in  the  com- 
munity where  he  lived  he  gave  his  services  in  the  Spanish-  American  War 
with  a  glad  heart,  and  the  story  of  self-sacrifice  during  this  part  of  his  life 
is  but  a  shadow  of  what  his  later  life  has  been. 

Doctor  Lyng  is  one  of  those  men  who  believe  that  years  of  thoughtful 
preparation  are  essential  to  success  in  professional  life,  and  his  preparation 
for  the  practice  of  medicine  has  taken  him  to  the  best  schools  in  Europe  as 
well  as  in  America.  The  success  of  Doctor  Lyng  as  a  physician  in  the  com- 
munity in  which  he  lives  has  not  been  a  mere  accident  but  is  the  natural 
result  of  a  noble  inheritance.  He  is  a  descendant  of  a  high  and  honored 
family  of  Norway  and  has  retained  those  traits  of  character  which  make 
the  Norwegians  among  the  most  industrious  in  the  world. 

The  birthplace  of  Doctor  Lyng  was  in  Namsos,  Norway,  where  he  was 
born  on  the  25th  of  December,  1865.  He  is  the  son  of  Martin  and  (Johanna) 
Lyng.  both  natives  of  Norway.  His  father  followed  the  occupation  of  a 
merchant,  and  died  in  1873. 

The  first  trip  of  Doctor  Lyng  to  America  was  made  when  he  w  as 
nineteen  years  old,  and  since  that  time  has  been  abroad  six  times.  After 
his  arrival  in  this  country  he  began  the  study  of  medicine,  which  took  him 
to  the  University  of  Minnesota,  where  he  was  graduated  from  the  medical 
department  in  1890.  Two  years  later  he  went  abroad  in  the  interest  of  his 
profession  and  visited  the  greatest  hospitals  and  medical  schools  in  Edin- 
burg,  Copenhagen,  Berlin  and  Paris.  He  returned  to  America  in  1897  an(l 
became  surgeon  for  the  Soo  Line,  in  which  capacity  he  gained  a  wide 
acquaintance  among  railroad  men.  After  a  period  of  practice  as  a  surgeon 
he  returned  to  Germany  for  a  further  study  of  medicine.  Upon  his  return 
to  America  he  found  the  country  in  a  state  of  excitement  over  the  Spanish- 


K)o  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

American  War,  and  as  a  consequence,  gave  his  services  to  medical  work  in 
the  war  zone,  where  he  gained  a  wide  experience  not  only  with  members  of 
his  chosen  profession  but  with  humanity  as  a  whole. 

In  1890  Doctor  Lyng  returned  to  Minnesota,  where  he  again  entered 
the  medical  world  as  physician  in  Alexandria.  In  1904  he  moved  to  Min- 
neapolis, where  he  practiced  medicine  for  four  years.  At  the  end  of  that 
time  Doctor  Lyng  sailed  again  for  Vienna  and  Paris  to  study  surgery,  and 
returned  in  1911.  Me  took  up  his  residence  in  Fergus  Falls,  where  the 
members  of  the  community  still  claim  his  services  as  a  physician. 

In  1900,  Dr.  John  Lyng  was  united  in  marriage  to  Clara  B.  Chilson,  a 
native  of  South  Dakota,  daughter  of  O.  A.  and  Marie  Chilson,  of  Webster, 
South  Dakota.  To  this  union  was  born  one  son,  John,  who  is  now  attending 
school  at  Minneapolis.     Mrs.  Lyng  died  on  February  8.  1014. 

Doctor  Lyng  holds  membership  in  the  American  Medical  Association, 
the  Minnesota  State  Medical  Society,  and  the  Park  Region  Medical  Society. 
He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Thulanian  Society  at  the  University  of  Minne- 
sota; a  reserve  member  of  the  medical  department.  Seventh  Army  Corps, 
United  States  Regulars;  a  member  of  the  Nordmands  Farbundet.  and  Lodge 
No.   10,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons.  Minneapolis.  Minnesota. 


EBEN  E.  CORLISS. 


Pioneer  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county  who  are  now  living  remember 
very  well  Eben.E.  Corliss,  who  is  also  a  pioneer  of  this  section,  now  living 
in  St.   Paul,  where  he  has  been  custodian  of  the  capitol  building  since  191 1. 

Eben  E.  Corliss  was  horn  on  September  1,  1841,  and  is  a  native  of 
Washington  county,  Vermont.  He  is  the  son  of  Timothy  E.  and  Elvira 
(Hutchins)  Corliss,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  New  Hampshire.  The 
father  was  a  fanner  and  a  lumberman  and  moved  to  Winona  county.  Minne- 
sota, in  1856,  settling  in  Saratoga  township,  where  he  pre-empted  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  of  land.  Me  improved  his  farm  and  remained  there 
until  after  the  close  of  the  ('nil  War.  Timothy  F.  and  Elvira  Corliss  were 
the  parents  of  eight  children.  The  mother  died  in  Saratoga  township, 
Winona  county,  December  <>.   1S60. 

Eben  E.  Corliss  remained  at  home  in  his  native  state,  receiving  his  edu- 
cation in  the  common  schools.  His  early  training  was  received  while  still 
living  with  his  parents  upon  the  old  home  farm.  At  the  breaking  out  of 
the  Civil  War.  he  enlisted  in  Company  EC,  Firsl  Regiment.  Minnesota  \  ohm 
teer  Infantry,  and.  after  a  period,  enlisted  in  Company  A.  Second  Regiment. 
Minnesota  Volunteer  Infantry,  serving  for  three  years.  Mr.  Corliss  passed 
through  a  very  trying  period  of  service,  lie  was  wounded  in  the  battle 
of  Chickamauga,  being  struck  by  a  bullet  in  the  hack  of  the  head  and.   for 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  1 99 

two  months,  was  confined  in  the  hospital,  known  as  No.  5,  at  Nashville, 
Tennessee.  On  May  26,  1864,  he  was  discharged  from  the  service  and  in 
April,  1865,  enlisted  in  Company  A,  Ninth  Regiment,  United  States  Veteran 
Volunteers,  serving  as  sergeant  until  the  close  of  the  war.  Mr.  Corliss  was 
in  a  great  many  severe  engagements.  Among  them  may  lie  named  the  fol- 
lowing: Mill  Springs,  Kentucky;  Pittsburg  Landing,  Siege  of  Corinth, 
Perryville,  Chickamauga,  and  others  of  lesser  importance.  He  was,  for 
a  time,  with  Sherman  before  Atlanta  and,  for  forty  days,  was  engaged  in 
weary  marching  toward  that  city,  being  under  fire  the  greater  part  of  the 
time.  After  returning  from  the  war.  he  settled  in  Saratoga  township, 
Winona  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  remained  on  the  farm  for  one  year. 
From  Saratoga  township,  he  moved  to  Chatfield,  Fillmore  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  studied  law  with  Judge  Ripley.  In  1870  he  was  admitted  to 
the  bar. 

\ftcr  coming  to  Otter  Tail  county  Eben  E.  Corliss  settled  at  Battle 
Lake,  Minnesota,  where  he  built  the  first  frame  house  in  the  county.  Its 
dimensions  were  sixteen  by  twenty  feet,  with  twelve  foot  posts.  He  settled 
on  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  one-half  of  which  was  pre- 
empted and  the  other  half  homesteaded.  He  continued  on  the  farm,  improv- 
ing it  until  1874,  at  which  time  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls  and  opened  a  law 
office,  engaging  actively  in  the  practice  of  his  profession.  Mr.  Corliss's 
property  interests  in  the  city  of  Fergus  Falls  consist  of  several  houses,  much 
business  property,  besides  his  fine  residence  with  all  modern  improvements, 
situated  on  Lincoln  avenue.  He  also  has  a  summer  residence  at  Clitherall 
lake. 

Mr.  Corliss  has  held  many  offices  of  trust  and  responsibility  within  the 
gift  of  the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county.  He  was  elected  county  attorney  in 
1870  and  held  that  office  during  the  greater  part  of  the  time  until  1884, 
serving  ten  years  in  all.  For  one  year  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  lower 
house  "!'  the  state  Legislature  in  1872.  He  was  a  member  of  the  state  capi- 
t < « 1  commission.  He  has  also  served  as  deputy  register  of  deeds,  as  deputy 
treasure  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  as  superintendent  of  the  county  schools, 
tilling  out  the  unexpired  term  occasioned  by  his  brother's  death.  The  brother, 
William  M.  Corliss,  was  the  first  superintendent  of  schools  in  Otter  Tail 
county. 

In  1864  Eben  !•'.  Corliss  was  married  to  Elizabeth  Tucker,  the  daugh- 
ter of  John  Tucker,  of  Saratoga  township.  Winona  county.  Minnesota.  Six 
children  were  born  to  them,  as^  follow:  Charles  W..  who  is  an  attorney-at- 
law,  who  was  married  in  1NK7  to  Alice  Stanton,  of  Fergus  Falls;  John  H.,  a 
graduate  of  Rush  Medical  College  and  now  a  resident  id'  Sumner.  Wash- 
ington: Florence,    lennie,  Marv  and   Roy  J. 


200  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

In  politics,  Mr.  Corliss  defends  the  principles  propounded  by  the  Repub- 
lican partv.  He  lias  attained  considerable  prominence  in  the  council-  of  the 
Republican  party  and  is  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  party  in  Otter  Tail  county. 
He  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  tin  ('itizens  Bank.  Fraternally,  he  is  a 
member  of  the  Masonic  lodge,  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  and  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 


AMUND  NELSON  HAUGEN. 

Well  known  in  the  business  and  commercial  life  of  Fergus  Falls.  .Min- 
nesota, is  Amund  Nelson  Haugen,  who  was  for  many  years  a  prominent 
business  man  of  Otter  Tail  county. 

Mr.  Nelson  was  born  on  March  i.  1846,  in  Ilollindahl,  Norway,  lie- 
is  the  son  of  Nells  E.  and  Carrie  (  Nelson)  Haugen.  The  entire  Haugen 
family  crossed  the  Atlantic  ocean  in  1S46  and  was  sixteen  weeks  on  the 
voyage.  They  emigrated  to  Quebec,  Canada,  and  from  Quebec  to  the 
United  States,  settling  at  Rock  Prairie,  Rock  county,  Wisconsin,  where  the 
father  purchased  land  and  built  a  stone  house.  Amund  Nelson  remained  on 
the  old  homestead  until  1862.  When  the  Civil  War  broke  out  he  enlisted  in 
the  Thirty-third  Regiment,  Wisconsin  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served 
three  years  in  Company  F.  Altogether  he  was  engaged  in  seventeen  1  un- 
ties, lie  received  an  honorable  discharge  in  Madison.  Wisconsin,  in  [865, 
and  after  his  return  home,  in  Rock  county,  he  remained  a  year  and  then 
moved  to  Highland  Prairie,  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  estab- 
lished a  general  store,  which  he  operated  for  one  year. 

After  one  year  at  Highland  Prairie,  Mr.  Nelson  removed  to  Spring 
Grove,  in  Houston  county,  where  he  opened  a  store,  which  he  sold  at  the 
end  of  one  year.  In  1808  Mr.  Nelson  came  by  team  all  the  way  to  St. 
Olaf,  Otter  Tail  county,  but  he  remained  only  long  enough  to  purchase 
eight  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Fergus  Falls  township. 

Amund  N.  Haugen  returned  to  Fillmore  county  and  in  1876  married 
Christina  Halverson.  They  have  a  family  of  seven  children,  as  follow: 
Henry,  who  resides  at  Rugby,  North  Dakota;  Clara;  Albert,  of  Duluth; 
Nellie,  who  teaches  in  Minot,  North  Dakota:  Charles.  Emma  and  Hannah, 
who  live  at  home  with  their  parents. 

Mr.  Nelson  returned  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  located  in  Elizabeth. 
He  engaged  in  the  farm  implement  business,  which  he  followed  for  twenty- 
one  years.  In  1897,  with  his  family,  he  removed  to  Fergus  Falls  and  after 
that  time  was  practically  retired  from  active  life. 

Mr.  Nelson  occupies  himself  by  loaning  money  and  by  occasionally 
buying  and  selling  real  estate,  lie  is  the  former  president  of  the  First  State 
Bank,  of  Fergus  Falls.     He  has  a  beautiful  and  spacious  residence  on  North 


OTTKU    TAIL    Cnr.XTY,    mixxksota. 


Union  street.  Mr.  Nelson  is  a  familiar  figure  on  the  street-  of  Fergus 
Falls  and  is  popular  among  all  classes  of  people.  Fraternally,  he  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic. 


ONON  TORGERSON. 


liurn  on  the  farm  which  he  now  owns  in  Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  .Minnesota.  May  2.  1878,  Onon  Torgerson  is  the  son  of  Gunder  and 
Christina  Torgerson,  who  were  natives  of  Norway  and  Sweden,  respect- 
ively. 

Air.  Torgerson's  father  was  born  on  .March  13,  [830,  and  his  mother 
was  horn  in  Sweden  in  1X41  >.  The  former  moved  to  Faribault,  Rice  county, 
Minnesota,  in  1867,  and  three  years  later  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he 
took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  fort)  acres.  lie  added  to  this  farm 
until  he  had  one  hundred  and  sixty-nine  acres,  where  his  son,  Onon,  now 
lives,  lie  cleared  most  of  the  land,  lie  died  in  iNoj  and  his  wife  in  [894. 
They  had  a  family  of  seven  children,  Emma,  Christian  (deceased),  Onon, 
Augusta,  (  >scar,  Esther  and  Anton.  They  were  members  of  the  Swedish 
Baptist  church.  Gunder  Torgerson  served  as  township  treasurer  for  a  num- 
ber of  years,  in  all  about  twelve. 

Onon  Torgerson  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  educated  in  the  public 
schools.  He  has  always  been  engaged  in  farming  and,  at  the  present  time 
owns  ninety-one  acres  of  the  old  homestead.  Mr.  Torgerson  has  erected  a 
magnificent  new  barn  and  a.  very  hue  residence.  These  buildings  were  con- 
structed in    [915. 

On  May  _'S,  [901,  Onon  Torgerson  was  married  to  Ella  Wessberg, 
who  was  born  in  Sweden  in  [883.  Her  father  was  born  111  Sweden  and  is 
n..w  deceased.  Her  mother  lives  in  Warren,  North  Dakota.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Torgerson  have  five  children.   Lorimer,   Ruth,  Chester,   Eunice  and  Thelma. 

Mr.  Torgerson's  paternal  grandparents  were  Torgus  and  Ose  Olson, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norwa)  and  who  came  to  Rice  county.  .Min- 
nesota, in  [856.  They  purchased  forty  acres  of  land  111  Rice  count)  and 
spent  their  last  days  there.  They  were  the  parents  of  six  children,  id"  whom 
Ole,  Bertha,  (hinder  and  Anne  are  deceased.  The  living  children  are  Ash- 
lex  and  Torgus.  Ashley  is  a  farmer  in  Aurdal  township  and  a  veteran  ol 
the  (  nil  War.  Torgus  is  also  a  farmer  in  \urdal  township  and  a  veteran 
of  the  Civil  War. 

There  is  no  family  in  Aurdal  township  which  is  more  favorably  known 
than  the  Torgersons.  They  have  worthily  discharged  every  duty  of  life, 
both  public  and  private,  and  today  Onon  Torgerson,  a  representative  of  the 
present  generation  of  the  family,  enjoys  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  all  of 
the  people  of  this  township. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.     MINNESOTA. 


EVEN  MATHIASON. 


"The  good  citizen  is  a  person  who  habitually  conducts  himself  with 
proper  regard  for  the  welfare  of  the  community  of  which  lie  is  a  meml>er, 
and  is  active  and  intelligent  in  his  co-operation  with  his  fellow  members  to 
that  end."  Even  Mathiason,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  September  3,  1855. 
was  twenty-seven  years  old  when  he  came  to  this  country.  His  parents, 
O.  and  Bertha  (Erikson)  Mathiason,  lived  and  died  in  his  native  land. 

Even  Mathiason  received  his  education  in  Norway  and  located  in  Peli- 
can Rapids  in  1X82  immediately  after  arriving  in  the  United  States.  It  was 
necessary  to  travel  from  Roxie,  Minnesota,  to  this  township  in  a  wagon 
drawn  by  oxen.  After  working  on  a  farm  for  nine  years  he  returned  to 
Norway  and  brought  hack  his  bride  whom  he  married  in  St.  Paul  in  1891. 

Mrs.  Mathiason  was  Olena,  daughter  of  Ole  Mathiason.  and  was  born 
in  Norway.  Her  father  died  in  that  country.  After  his  marriage.  Mr. 
Mathiason  located  in  the  present  building  and  operated  a  hotel  for  the  fol- 
lowing six  years.  1  le  then  laid  in  a  stock  of  groceries  and  has  been  a 
grocery  merchant  ever  since  The  children  born  to  Mi.  and  Mrs.  Mathiason 
are  Ole:  Elmer,  aged  twenty-two  years:  Beney  Louis,  aged  eighteen  years: 
Ethel  Meria,  aged  twelve  years,  and  Lawrence  William,  aged  seven  years. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.   Mathiason  are  members  of  the  Synodical  church. 

Mr.  Mathiason  was  for  some  time  a  member  of  the  local  school  board 
and  to  its  work  gave  his  best  thought  and  attention.  A  residence  of  thirty- 
three  years  in  one  town,  during  which  time  Mr.  Mathiason  has  built  up  a 
reputation  tor  honor  in  business  and  loyalty  and  uprightness  in  private  life, 
make  him  one  of  the  esteemed  citizens  of  this  township. 


NELS  GERH  VRDSON. 


One  of  the  successful  farmer-  of  Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  who  i-  a  native  of  Xorwav.  is  WE  Gerhardson,  who  was  born 
in  Norway,  April  8,   [861. 

Mr.  Gerhardson  is  the  son  of  Andrew  and  Kare  1  WE  1  Gerhardson, 
both  of  whom  were  born  111  Xorwav.  the  former  in  [823  and  the  latter  in 
[830.  \ftcr  their  marriage,  in  their  native  kind,  they  started  for  America 
on  \pnl  11.  [86l,  and.  upon  arrival  in  the  United  States,  settled  in  the 
-late  of  Iowa.  Later,  however,  the)  emigrated  to  Freeborn  county,  Minne- 
sota, and.  subsequently,  to  (titer  Tail  county,  before  the  city  of  Fergus 
Falls  was  thought  of  ami  at  a  time  when  there  was  only  one  grocer)  Store 
on  the  present  site  of  Fergus  Falls.  About  three  months  later.  Mr.  Ger- 
hardson's  grandfather  came  to  America  and  took  a  homestead  in  Aurdal 
township,     comprising    one    hundred    and    sixty   acres.      Mr.    Gerhardson's 


OTTKS    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  203 

father  inherited  this  farm  and  died  upon  it  in  1907.  His  wife  died  about 
four  years  previously,  in  1903.  Mr.  Gerhardson's  parents  had  ten  children, 
of  whom  one.  Lena,  died  early  in  life.  The  others  were  Gulena,  Nels, 
Christine,  Gilbert,  Karl,  Anne,  Ole,  Otto  and  Tilla.  Mr.  Gerhardson's  par- 
ents were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

Nels  Gerhardson  was  a  mere  lad  when  his  parents  settled  in  Aurdal 
township.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the  township,  reared  mi 
the  farm  and  has  always  been  engaged  in  farming.  In  partnership  with  his 
sons,  Mr.  Gerhardson  owns  two  hundred  and  ten  acres  of  land  three  miles 
out  of  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  is  engaged  in  fanning  and  stock  raising. 
Since  he  acquired  this  farm.  Air.  Gerhardson  has  made  many  improvements. 
He  has  erected  substantial  buildings,  fenced  the  land  and  installed  adequate 
drainage,  all  of  which  has  contributed  to  make  the  farm  a  most  desirable 
tract  and  most  productive. 

In  1887  Nels  Gerhardson  was  married  to  Mattie  Vegin,  who  is  a  native 
of  Minnesota,  born  in  1866.  Mrs.  Gerhardson's  father  was  Knnt  Vegin, 
who  was  an  early  settler  in  Grant  county.  Minnesota,  where  he  spent  his 
last  days.  Mr.  and  Airs.  Nels  Gerhardson  have  been  the  parents  of  five 
children:  Eva,  who  is  deceased;  Eva,  who  married  Guilder  Mjesth  and  has 
two  children.  Jenette  and  Norman:  Anton,  who  lives  at  home:  Eddie,  who 
also  lives  at  home,  and  Martha,  who  is  deceased.  The  mother  of  these  chil- 
dren died  on  March  12.  1896.  Nels  Gerhardson  is  a  highly-respected  citi- 
zen in  the  township  and  county  where  he  has  lived  for  several  years  and 
where  he  is  well   known. 


LOUIS  HALYORSON. 


Louis  Halvorson,  a  native  of  Fergus  Falls  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minesota,  was  horn  a  mile  and  a  half  from  Elizabeth,  November  13.  [881, 
is  one  of  the  successful  young  farmers  of  Aurdal  township.  Mr.  Halvor- 
son is  the  son  of  Mathias  and  Mare  (Holte)  Halvorson.  the  former  of 
whom  was  horn  in  Norway  in  [839  and  the  latter  horn  in  that  country  in 
1851.  Mathias  Halvorson  moved  to  southern  Minnesota,  and  later  to  Otter 
Tail  county,  settling  on  a  homestead  one  ami  one-half  miles  south  of  Eliza- 
beth, where  he  lived  until  [CjOI.  lie  now  lives  retired  in  Fergus  falls.  Mrs. 
Mathias  Halvorson,  who  was  married  to  Mathias  Halvorson  in  Otter  Tail 
county,  is  the  daughter  of  Johannes  and  Bertha  (Holler)  Holte,  who  wire 
early  >ettler^  111  Otter  Tail  county,  but  who  are  now  both  deceased.  Air. 
Halvorson's  parents  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  They  had  alto- 
gether a  familv  of  fourteen  children,  seven  of  whom  are  as  follow  ;  Henry, 
Louis,  Mollie.  Hannah,  Emma,  Eddie  and  Alfred:  the  others  are  deceased 

Reared   on   the  old   homestead    farm   in    Fergus    Falls   township,    Louis 


204  OTTER     TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

Halvorson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  as  soon  as  he  was  old 
enough  took  up  fanning  as  a  life  vocation.  In  1910  Air.  Halvorson  moved 
to  the  farm  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  which  he  now  owns,  in 
Aurdal  township.  Ik-  is  engaged  in  fanning  and  stuck  raising  and  has 
made  a  success  of  his  chosen  vocation. 

In  [906  Louis  Halvorson  was  married  to  Emma  Brekke,  the  daughter 
of  Halvor  < ..  Brekke,  who  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Halvorson  have  five  children,  Eleanor,  .Morris,  Bertha,  Harry  and  Ida. 

Mr.  Halvorson  has  been  more  or  less  active  in  local  politics  and  is 
now  serving  as  clerk  of  Aurdal  township,  lie  and  his  wife  and  family  are 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 


JACOB  CLARENCE  EVELAND. 

Among  the  well-known  fanners  of  Aurdal  township  is  Jacob  Clarence 
Eveland,  who  owns  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  magnificent  farming 
land,  three  and  one-half  miles  northeast  of  Fergus  halls,  Minnesota,  and 
who  was  horn  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  September  7.    [873. 

Mr.  Eveland  is  the  sou  of  Jacob  M.  and  Angeline  (Stuffleben)  Eye- 
land.  the  former  of  whom  was  horn  in  Fulton  count),  Illinois,  in  [843,  and 
the  latter  born  in  the  same  county.  Jacob  M.  Eveland  was  the  son  of 
Henry  and  Irene  (Miller)  Eveland,  the  former  of  whom  was  horn  in 
Indiana,  and  the  latter  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  Henry  Eveland  and  wife 
emigrated  to  Fulton  county,  Illinois,  and.  after  living  there  for  twenty 
years,  emigrated  to  Bremer  county,  Iowa.  It  was  Henry  Eveland's  brother. 
Mason  Eveland,  who  was  the  first  settler  in  Lafayette  township,  Bremer 
county,  Iowa.  Henry  Eveland  himself  was  the  second  settler  in  that  town 
ship.  Mr.  Eveland's  paternal  grandfather  died  in  Bremer  count)-,  Iowa,  in 
[879.     I  lis  wife  had  died  many  years  before. 

Mr.  Eveland's  maternal  grandparents  were  Joshua  and  Polly  (Alsbury) 
Stuffleben.  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  Keystone  state  and  who.  after 
their  marriage  in  Pennsylvania,  emigrated  to  Fulton  count)-,  Illinois,  and 
later  to  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  settling  in  Lafayette  township.  Loth  died  in 
Bremer  county,  the  former  in  [913,  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine,  and  the  latter 
in   [885,  ai  the  aye  of  sixty-three  years. 

Mr.  Eveland's  Father,  the  venerable  Jacob  M.  Eveland,  is  now  living 
in  Lafayette  town-hip,  Bremer  county,  lie  owns  two  hundred  and  sevent) 
one  acres  of  the  old  homestead,  at  one  time  owned  a  number  of  farms.  Hi' 
also  owns  land  in  Mississippi.  I'.v  his  marriage  to  Angeline  Stuffleben  then 
were  horn  nine  children,  live  of  whom  grew  to  manhood  and  womanhood. 
Nellie,    |acob  Clarence,   Bertha,  Glenn  and    \lvin. 

facob    Clarence    Eveland    was    reared    on    the    old    homestead    farm    in 


OTTER     TAIL     L'lll'XTV,     MIXXF.SUTA. 


-'"5 


Bremer  county,  Iowa,  and  educated  in  the  public  schools.  Mr.  Eveland  has 
always  been  engaged  in  fanning.  In  1904  he  emigrated  to  South  Dakota 
and  purchased  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land  in  that  state,  which, 
however,  he  sold  in  October,  1909,  when  he  came  to  Aurdal  township  and 
purchased  two  hundred  and  forty  acres,  three  and  one-half  miles  northeast 
of  Fergus  Palls,  Minnesota. 

In  i8i»J  Jacob  <  '..  Eveland  was  married  to  Fannie  Chestnut,  a  native  of 
Fulton  count}-.  Illinois,  who  was  born  on  April  27,  1874.  Mrs.  Eveland's 
father  and  mother  were  John  and  Emma  ( Stuffleben)  Chestnut,  both  of 
whom  were  natives  of  Fulton  county,  Illinois.  Mrs.  Eveland's  mother  died 
in  [885,  and  her  father  died  on  September  10,  1915,  at  Manito,  Illinois. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Eveland  have  six  children.  Tina,  Melvin,  Everett,  Bessie,  Ada 
and  Merrill,  all  of  whom  are  living. 

Mr.  and  Airs.  Eveland  and  family  are  members  of  the  Methodist  epis- 
copal church.  Nominally,  Mr.  Eveland  is  identified  with  the  Democratic 
party,  but  he  has  never  been  especially  interested  in  politics  and  has  newer 
aspired  to  office.  lie  is  known  in  the  community  where  he  lives  as  a  success- 
ful  farmer,  a  good  man  and  a  valuable  citizen. 


II  W.VOR  G.   P.RFKK1 


Halvor  G.  Brekke,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Aurdal  township.  Otter  Tail 
county.  Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Norway,  where  he  was  born  on  June  15. 
1845.  Mr.  Brekke  is  the  sun  of  Guilder  Olson  and  Sigred  (Aslakson) 
Brekke,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway.  Mr.  Brekke's  father  was 
born  in  March.    [808,  and  his  mother  in   February,   1808. 

The  Brekkes  emigrated  to  Dane  county.  Wisconsin,  in  1861,  and  to 
Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  in  T870.  They  took  up  a 
homestead  in  section  9,  and  here  both  lived  until  their  deaths.  Mr.  Brekke's 
father  died  in  April,  [896,  and  his  mother  in  September,  1901.  They  were 
the  parents  of  twelve  children,  of  whom  Ole,  Julia.  Aasne,  Aasne  and  Mar- 
garet are  deceased.  The  living  children  are  Aslak.  Sandow,  Torger,  Hal- 
vor G,  Julia,  Ole  and  Margaret. 

Halvor  G.  Brekke  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway  and. 
in  1865.  four  years  after  his  parents  had  come  to  Wisconsin,  the  son  also 
came  to  Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  and  settled  in  Deerfield  township,  where 
he  worked  on  a  farm.  He  accompanied  his  parents  to  Otter  Tail  county  in 
[870  and  took  a  homestead  farm  of  our  hundred  and  forty-seven  acres. 
where  he  now  lives.  This  splendid  farm  is  situated  in  section  9,  of  Aurdal 
township.  Mr.  Brekke  cleared  the  land,  which  he  had  acquired  b 
stead  right,  and  in  [889  built  a  good  residence.  During  the  same  year  he 
also  built  a  very  commodious  barn,  which  was  destroyed   by  lightning  and 


206  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.     MINNESOTA. 

which  was  replaced  in  1912  by  a  magnificent  new  barn,  forty-eight  by 
sixty-six  by  fourteen  feet.  Mr.  Brekke  is  a  general  fanner  and  stockman 
and  has  been  successful  in  his  chosen  vocation. 

In  [877  Halvor  (I.  Brekke  was  married  to  Betsey  Evenson,  who  was 
born  on  August  25,  1845,  ni  Norway  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Evan  and 
Gunhildl  Knutson)  Evenson.  In  [861  Mrs.  Brekke' s  parents  came  to  Dane 
county,  Wisconsin,  and  there  both  died.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Halvor  G.  Brekke 
have  been  the  parents  of  four  children,  GustaA  Severin,  Emma,  Emma  and 
Henry  Benjamin.  Gustav  Severin.  who  was  born  on  the  farm  where  he 
now  lives  on  April  28,  1S7S.  married  Huldah  Johnson,  who  was  born  in 
Friberg  township,  ( )tter  Tail  count).  Minnesota.  December  7,  1889.  They 
have  ni>  children,  lie  is  employed  on  the  old  homestead.  Emma,  the  sec- 
ond child,  is  deceased.  Emma,  the  third  child,  married  Louis  Halvorson 
and  has  five  children,  Eleanor,  Morris,  Bertha,  Harry  and  Ida.  Henry 
Benjamin  lives  at  Dilworth,  Minnesota. 

Halvor   G.    Brekke   has    served    as    a    member   of    the    school   board    in 
Aurdal  township  and  has  also  served  as  trustee  of  the  township  and  as 
supervisor   for   fourteen  years.      He  was  assessor  of  the  township   for  six- 
teen  years.      Mr.   and   Mrs.    Brekke  and    family  are  active   members  of   the 
Lutheran  church. 


\K'\K   ENGEBRETSON. 


Arne  Engebretson,  a  well-known  farmer  of  Aurdal  township,  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota,  was  horn  on  November  4.  1850,  in  Norway,  and  is 
the  son  of  Engebret  Gunderson  and  Raghnild  (Olson)  Engebretson,  who 
spent  their  entire  lives  in  Norway.     Arne  Engebretson  was  their  only  child. 

Mr.  Engebretson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  land, 
and  in   f882  came  to    America  and  settled  at   Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota. 

A  short  time  after  coming  to  this  country  he  moved  to  Aurdal  township, 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land,  where  he 
now  lives.  This  land  has  been  subsequently  increased  to  about  one  hundred 
and  twelve  acres  and  is  located  in  sections  15.  to  and  0,  Aurdal  township. 
Mr.  Engebretson  is  a  farmer  and  stockman.  His  land  is  highly  productive 
and   he  raises  all  crops  common  to  this  latitude. 

In  [879  Arne  Engebretson  was  married  in  Norway  to  Mary  Olson,  a 
native  of  Norway,  horn  in  [851.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Ole  Severson  and 
[ennie  Severson,  who.  in  [882,  came  to  America  and  settled  in  Otter  Tail 
county.  Mrs.  Engebretson's  father  died  in  1014.  and  her  mother  died  in 
the  same  year,  both  being  eighty-eighl  years  old  at  the  time  of  their  deaths. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Engebretson  have  seven  children.  Ole,  Engebret,  Richard. 
\ntoii.    (  histav,    I  'scar   and    1  lannah. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  207 

Arne  Engebretson  is  independent  in  politics.  He  and  his  family  are 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  Mr.  Engebretson  has  served  as  super- 
visor of  Aurdal  township  and  has  also  served  as  a  member  of  the  school 
hoard.  Likewise,  he  has  been  assessor  of  Aurdal  township  for  seven  years. 
It  may  be  said  of  \rnc  Engebretson  that  he  has  worthily  discharged  all  of 
the  duties  of  life,  both  public  and  private,  and  that  he  has  a  host  of  friends 
in  the  township  and  county  where'  he  lives. 


UJGUST  and  WILLIAM  TRENNE. 

Anion-  the  prosperous  farmers  and  successful  stock  raisers  of  Oscar 
township.  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  are  August  and  William  Trenne. 
the  former  horn  on  August  25,  [883,  the  latter  on  January  15,  1880,  in 
Oscar  township,  Otter  Tail  count)",  suns  of  Fritz  and  Charlotte  (Druskey) 
Trenne,  natives  of  Germany.  Fritz  Trenne  was  educated  in  the  common 
schools  of  Germany,,  he  later  becoming  a  soldier  of  the  German  army  and 
taking  part  in  the  war  with  Austria,  in  [866,  and  in  the  Franco-Prussian 
War.  during  the  years  1870-71.  During  the  last  year  of  his  militarv  career, 
Fritz  Trenne  served  as  an  officer  in  the  army  of  his  native  country.  Shortly 
following  his  marriage,  the  elder  Trenne,  in  1872,  came  to  America  and 
located  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  bought  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  of  land  in  Oscar  township,  a  place  which  Fritz  Trenne  cultivated 
until  1007,  when  he  retired  and  moved  to  Fergus  Falls,  where  he  lived  until 
his  death,  on  (  )ctober  12,  1912.  Charlotte,  the  widow  of  Fritz  Trenne. 
now  lives  at  Fergus  Falls.  Fritz  Trenne  was  not  only  a  successful  farmer, 
as  one  who  acquired  six  hundred  and  fifty-three  acres  of  land,  hut  he  was  a 
man  prominent  in  the  affairs  of  his  community,  having  been  the  occupant  of 
several  township  school  offices  Fritz  and  Charlotte  Trenne  were  the  par- 
ents of  eleven  children,  Paul,  Lena.  William.  Elizabeth,  Tillie,  August, 
Emily,   Martin.  Frencie,  Minnie  and  Malvine. 

William  Trenne  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  district  No.  Ill,  Oscar 
township,  Otter  Fail  county,  after  which  he  engaged  in  general  farming  and 
stock  raising,  an  occupation  which  Mr.  Trenne  is  now  following  on  his  well- 
improved  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  in  Oscar  township.  In  addition  to  his 
farm  activity,  William  Trenne  is  prominently  connected  m  business  life,  he 
being  one  of  the  organizers  and  a  stockholder  of  the  Elizabeth  Creamen 
Company,  as  well  as  being  an  officer  of  the  Cream  of  Barley  Company,  of 
Minneapolis. 

On  November  .^.  1904,  William  Trenne  was  married  10  Ida  Krause.  a 
native  of  the  -talc  of  Nebraska,  and  to  this  marriage  have  been  born  four 
children,    Walter.    Francis,     Wired    and    Tin's. 

Auin'st    Trenne.    after    his    school    davs,    became    a    fanner,    he    takins 


2o8  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    .MINNESOTA. 

charge  of  the  old  Trenne  homestead,  which  Mr.  Trenne  has  greatly  improved 
and  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  which  August  Trenne  has 
brought  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  Mr.  Trenne  now  gives  his  time  to 
general  farming  and  the  raising  of  large  numbers  of  good  grade  live  stock. 
On  June  24,  1915,  August  Trenne  was  married  to  Johannah  Greenogle, 
the  daughter  of  John  Greenogle  and  wife,  prominent  people  of  their  com- 
munity. The  Trenne  family  are  all  prominent  members  of  the  Norwegian 
!  utheran  church,  of  <  Iscar  township,  they  giving  of  their  efforts  and  means 
for  the  support  of  the  work  of  this  congregation. 


NELS  T.  MOEN. 


One  of  the   active  and   progressive   citizens   of    Fergus    Falls, 
lawyer  and   writer   and   a   good  talker,   gifted   particularly   with   line   powers 
of  description,  i-  Nels  T.   Moen,  editor  and  manager  of  the  Ugeblad  Pub- 
lishing  Company  and  municipal  judge  of   Fergus  Falls. 

Nels  T.  Moen  was  horn  in  Freeborn  county,  Minnesota,  May  26,  [866, 
the  son  of  [ollef  and  Man  (Nelson)  Moen.  When -Tollef  Nelson  was 
twenty-two  years  old,  in  [856,  he  and  his  brother  landed  in  Quebec,  Can- 
after  a  fourteen  week-  voyage  on  the  ocean  from  Norway.  Upon 
arriving  in  Quebec,  the  two  brothers  borrowed  enough  money  to  reach  their 
destination,  traveling  b\  land  and  by  canal  boat  until  they  reached  Michigan. 
From  .Michigan  they  walked  several  hundred  miles,  finally  reaching  their 
uncle's  home  at  Big  Canoe,  Iowa. 

Tollef    Nelson   and   his   brother    farmed    in    Iowa    for   a    time   and    then 

ed  to  Waseca  county,  Minnesota,  where  they  worked  at  fanning  on 
shares.  Later  the}  moved  to  the  next  county,  Freeborn,  and  there  worked 
in  the  same  way.  In  1868,  they  purchased  a  yoke  of  oxen  and  a  wagon  and 
moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  settling  in  Tumuli  township.  They  each  took 
a  homestead  near  Dalton  and  there  Tollef  Nelson  spent  the  rest  of  his  life, 
hi-  death  occurring  in  October.   1895. 

Tollef  Kelson  and  his  wife,  who  before  her  marriage  was  Alary  Lar- 
son, were  the  parent-  of  twelve  children,  four  of  whom  died  in  infancy, 
those  who  survived  being  as  follow:  Carrie,  who  is  the  wife  of  T.  O. 
Udbye  and  lives  in  Fergus  Falls:  Xels  T.,  the  subject  of  this  -ketch:  Inger. 
who  i-  now  Mrs.  1'.  C.  Svensrud  and  li\i-  on  the  old  homestead;  Lars,  who 
also  lives  on  part  of  the  old  homestead;  .Martin,  who  i-  a  resident  of  Fergus 
ball-;  \utou.  who  i-  a  resident  of  Canada;  Thore,  who  lives  in  Fergus 
ball-,  and  b.hnc,  who  married  b'uiil  Brusven  and  lives  at  Rothsay,  Minnesota. 

Nels  T.  Moen  received  hi-  elementary  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Tumuli  township,  tin-  county.  Me  first  attended  school  in  a  dug-out. 
later  in  a   log;  house  and  still  later  in  a    frame  building.      lie  remained  on   a 


NELS  T.  MOEN. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2CK) 

farm  with  his  parents  until  [893  and,  after  graduating  from  the  Red  Wing 
Seminary,  attended  the  University  of  Minnesota  and  was  graduated  from 
the  law  department  of  that  institution.  After  finishing  his  legal  education, 
Mr.  Moen  moved  to  Ada.  m  Norman  county,  but,  subsequently,  was  offered 
the  position  of  principal  of  the  school  at  tialstead,  which  he  accepted.  In 
addition  to  his  duties  as  principal  of  the  school,  he  practiced  law  in  the 
evening.  In  1897  -Mr.  .Moen  returned  to  Ada,  where  he  remained  for  ten 
years,  having  in  the  meantime  been  elected  judge  of  the  probate  of  Norman 
county,  in  which  capacity  he  served  for  two  terms.  He  also  served  as 
county  attorney   for  one  term. 

In  1907.  .Mr.  Moen,  who  is  a  vigorous  and  capable  opponent  of  the 
liquor  traffic,  accepted  the  position  of  state  attorney  for  the  anti-saloon  league 
of  Minnesota,  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  two  years,  or  until  1909,  in 
which  year  he  moved  to  Fergus  Falls.  As  a  platform  orator  in  behalf  of 
temperance.  Mr.  Moen  has  few  superiors  in  this  state  and  to  the  cause  of 
temperance  he  has  given  service  equal  to  that  of  any  man  who  has  labored 
in  this  great  cause. 

After  Mr.  Moen's  removal  to  Fergus  Falls,  he  engaged  in  the  practice 
of  law.  During  the  legislative  session  of  i<)ji.  he  served  as  chief  clerk  to 
the  re-apportionment  committee  and  in  the  same  year  was  appointed  muni- 
cipal judge  of  Fergus  Falls  by  Governor  Fl>erhart.  In  1912  he  was  elected 
to  the  same  office.  One  year  previously,  Mr.  Moen  became  editor  and  man- 
ager of  the  Ugeblad  Publishing  Company,  the  publishers  of  the  Fergus  Falls 
!  rgeblad,  the  oldest   Scandinavian  paper  west   of  the  "twin  cities." 

In  [893  Mr.  Moen  was  married  to  Betsy  Johnson,  who  died  in  1008, 
leaving  four  sons,  Thomas  O.,  Milford  A..  Neal  B.  and  Caroll.  On  Decem- 
ber 26,   1911,   Mr.   Moen  married,  secondly.  Ingeborg-  Stortroen. 

During  the  summer  of  1014.  Mr.  Moen  traveled  in  Norway  and  visited 
his  ancestral  home  in  that  picturesque  country.  The  Moen  family  are  all 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 


ANDERS  A.  BERGRUD. 


Anders  A.  Bergrud,  who  has  made  a  success  of  farming  in  \unlal 
township,  Otter  Tail  count),  Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Norway,  horn  there 
on  July  23,  [851,  the  son  of  \ndiew  V  and  Sigrid  (Hengsley)  Bergrud, 
both  of  whom  were  horn  in   Norway. 

Mr.  Bergrud's  parents  came  to  America  and  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  in  [883.  His  father  died  in  this  county  in  r N< >(>.  Mi-  mothei  is 
now  living  in  Sverdrup,  and  is  eighty-four  years  old. 

Mr  Bergrud  was  educated  in  Norway  and  in  1S7N  came  to  Otter  Tail 
(rib) 


2IO  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

county.  Two  years  later  he  homesteader!  eighty  acres  of  land  in  the  county 
and,  shortly  thereafter,  erected  good  buildings  on  the  farm.  He  now  has 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  his  home  farm,  and  has  added  fort) 
acres  in  section  21,  eighty  acres  in  section  21  and  forty  acres  in  another 
tract,  also  in  section  21,  all  bought  after  the  first  one  hundred  and  sixty. 

On  November  23,  1879,  Mr.  Bergrud  was  married  to  Sigrid  Boen, 
who  was  born  in  Norway  on  November  7.  1856.  and  who  is  the  daughter  of 
Erick  Trond  Boen,  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Bergrud  have  been  the  parents  of  five  children.  Celia  Ida,  Alfred,  "Theo- 
dore N.,  Inga  and  Henry.  Celia  Ida,  horn  in  [880,  is  the  wife  of  Olaf 
Haave  and  has  four  children,  Selma,  Alvin.  Benne  and  Margaret.  Alfred. 
born  on  November  25,  1881,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  lives 
at  home  with  his  parents.  lie  has  charge  of  the  farm  and  is  engaged  in 
general  farming  and  stock  raising.  He  also  owns  forty  acres  of  land  in 
Aurdal  township.  Theodore  N.,  horn  in  t88}.  died  in  IQ07.  Inga,  horn  in 
1886,  is  the  wife  of  Peter  YVeggeland.     Henry  was  born  on  May  27,   t8q6. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bergrud  and  family  occupy  a  comfortable  and  com- 
modious home  in  Aurdal  township  and  are  among  the  most  highly  respected 
citizens  living  in  this  township. 


\NDRFAY  BR  \  \  I  I- \ 


\  successful  farmer  of  Aurdal  township.  Otter  Tail  county.  Minne- 
sota, is  Andrew  Braaten.  who  was  born  in  Moore  count}'.  Minnesota,  Sep 
tember  4,  1869. 

Mr.  Braaten  is  the  son  of  Eric  and  Gtinel  Braaten,  both  of  whom  were 
born  in  Norway,  the  father  on  September  27,  1827,  and  the  mother  on 
December  3,  1836.  After  their  marriage  in  Norway,  they  came  to  America, 
in  i860,  and  settled  in  Mower  county,  Minnesota.  Three  years  later  the) 
settled  in  Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  homesteading  one 
hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  where  their  son.  Andrew,  now  lives,  and 
where  he  was  reared.  Eric  Braaten  was  able  to  clear  some  of  this  land 
before  his  death  in  [902.  He  also  made  many  improvements  upon  the 
farm.  His  widow  is  still  living.  They  had  a  family  of  five  children,  of 
whom  Andrew  was  the  fourth.  The  other  children  were  Hannah  Karine. 
Ragnhild  and  Nellie.     Of  these  children,  Hannah  is  deceased. 

Andrew  Braaten  was  reared  principally  on  the  farm  which  he  now 
owns.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  \urdal  township  and.  as 
soon  as  lie  was  old  enough,  took  up  farming  with  his  father.  Mr.  Braaten 
owns  two  hundred  and  eighty  acres  of  land  and  occupies  a  fine  residence. 

Andrew  Braaten  was  married  in  1896  to  Lena  Vis,  who  was  born  in 
Aurdal  township  ami  who  is  the  daughter  of  Christopher  and  Gertrude  Aas. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  211 

early  settlers  in  Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Both  of  Mrs.  Braaten's 
parents  are  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andrew  Braaten  have  four  children, 
Grace,  Geneva,  Erick  and  Amy. 

Mr.  and  Airs.  Braaten  are  members  of  and  take  an  active  part  in  the 
Lutheran  church  of  Aurdal  township.  The  members  of  the  Braaten  family 
are  also  identified  with  this  church.  Not  only  is  Mr.  Braaten  a  most  suc- 
cessful fanner,  but  he  is  a  highly  intelligent  and  valuable  citizen  in  the  com- 
nnmitv  where  he  has  lived  for  so  many  years. 


lOHN  O.  SVIEN. 


John  O.  Svien,  well-known  farmer  and  citizen,  who  by  the  conduct  of 
his  life  in  the  community,  has  won  a  prominent  place  in  the  ranks  of  citizen- 
ship, and  who,  as  the  result  of  an  unselfish  life  in  the  interests  of  the  town- 
ship and  county,  has  a  host  of  friends  and  appreciative  fellow  citizens,  was 
horn  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  on  April  25,  1872,  the  son  of  Ove  J. 
and  Ingred  (Boe)  Svien,  Ove  J.  Svien  being  the  son  of  Johannes  and  Anna 
(  Lunde )  Svien,  who  were  horn  in  Norway  and  came  to  America  in  the  year 
1856,  locating  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin,  later  going  to  the  state  of  Iowa, 
where  they  lived  for  some  time  and  then  came  to  Minnesota,  settling  in 
Goodhue  county,  where  they  spent  their  last  days.  Ingred  Boe  is  the  daugh- 
ter of  Aslak  and  Bertha  Boe,  who  were  farmers  in  their  native  land  of 
Norway,  where  they  lived  their  entire  lives. 

Ove  J.  and  Ingred  Svien,  parents  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  were 
born  in  Norway,  where  the  father  lived  until  he  was  nine  years  of  age,  and 
then  came  to  America,  the  mother  coming  with  relatives  when  she  was 
twenty-two  years  of  age.  On  reaching  America.  Ove  J.  Svien  became  a 
farmer  on  eighty  acres  of  land  which  he  secured  in  Goodhue  county,  Minne- 
sota, on  which  he  lived  until  the  year  1896,  and  then  moved  to  Grant  county. 
Minnesota,  where  he  bought  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land,  which 
he  farmed  until  the  year  ioi-\  at  which  time  Ove  J.  Svien  retired  and  moved 
to  the  city  of  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  where  he  still  lives.  Ove  J.  and  Ingred 
Svien  were  the  parents  of  eight  children.  John.  Anna,  \slak.  Bertha,  Andrew, 
Henry,  Emma  and  John  Bouchard.  In  religious  affiliation,  Ove  J.  Svien 
and  his  family  are  members  of  the  United  Lutheran  church. 

John  O.  Svien  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  Good- 
Inn-  county,  Minnesota,  after  which  he  came,  in  the  year  [896,  to  Otter  Tail 
count},  Minnesota,  and  rented  a  farm  in  Tumuli  township,  where  he  lived 
for  two  years  and  then  he  went  to  the  state  of  North  Dakota,  homesteading 
a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  on  which  he  lived  for  twelve  years, 
in  that  state.  -After  this  time  John  O.  Svien  returned  to  (liter  'fail  county, 
Minnesota,    and   bought   a    farm   of   one   hundred   and    sixty-three   acres    in 


212  .  OTTER    TAII      COUNTY,    MINNESOTA 

Tumuli  township,  near  the  village  of  Dalton,  where  he  now  lives  and  follows 
general  agricultural  pursuits. 

During  the  year  1905  John  O.  Svien  was  married  to  Lena  Brekke,  who 
was  bom  in  Tumuli  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  the  daughter 
of  Johannes  Brekke  and  wife.  To  the  marriage  of  John  O.  and  Lena  Svien 
were  born  two  children,  Inez  Othelia  and  Truman  Julian.  John  O.  Svien 
and  his  wife  and  children  are  members  and  active  workers  and  supporters 
■  if  the  United  Lutheran  church  at  Dalton. 

In  political  life  John  O.  Svien  has  taken  no  particular  part,  but  has 
chosen  to  lie  a  good  citizen  of  private  life  and  to  serve  his  community,  as  he 
can.  from  the  common  walks  of  life  and  citizenship. 


TOSKPH   A.  OTTE. 


Among  the  younger  men  of  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  business  and 
financial  circles,  is  Joseph  A.  Otte,  cashier  of  the  State  Bank  of  Bluffton.  a 
citizen  whose  life  is  proving  of  great  value  to  the  community,  not  only  in 
the  business  world,  but  as  a  man  who  is  interested  in  the  development  of 
his  town  and  township  to  a"  greater  and  higher  plane  in  the  various  lines  of 
endeavor  and  activity  in  which  they  are  engaged.  A  man  of  thorough  cul- 
ture, one  with  excellent  preparation  for  the  profession  in  which  he  is  so 
capably  engaged,  a  citizen  who  in  those  things  to  which  he  has  laid  his 
hands  has  been  peculiarly  successful,  and  a  man  who  because  of  the  force 
and  strength  of  his  life  has  a  host  of  friends  and  admiring  fellow  citizens, 
he  is  worthy  oi  a  prominent  place  in  the  ranks  ot  leading  men  in  Otter  Tail 
county,    Minnesota. 

Joseph  A.  Otte  was  born  in  Stearns  county.  Minnesota,  on  November  4. 
[887,  the  son  of  William  and  Mary  I  Macks)  Otte.  both  of  whom  were 
born  in  German)  and  lived  in  that  country  until  about  the  year  1880.  when, 
having  married,  the)  came  to  America  and  located  in  Stearns  county,  Min- 
nesota, where  William  Otte  settled  on  a  farm  one  and  one-half  miles  north 
of  Melrose.  William  and  Marx  Otte  were  the  parents  of  seven  children. 
Marv.  \una.  Bernard,  William.  Joseph.  Catherine  and  Henry.  In  religious 
affiliation  the  elder  Otte  and  his  family  are  communicants  in  the  Roman 
1  .nholic  church. 

Joseph  V  Otte  received  his  early  education  in  the  common  schools  of 
Melrose.  Minnesota,  later  attending  St.  Joseph's  Universit)  at  Columbus, 
Ohio,  for  three  years,  and  then  pursuing  a  business  and  commercial  course. 
including  shorthand  and  typewriting  at  Saul  Centre.  Minnesota,  after  which 
he  accepted  a  position  as  first  bookkeeper  of  the  State  Lank  of  Monticello, 
Minnesota,  where  he  remained  for  two  years  anil  then  went  to  Buffalo, 
Minnesota,   and   became  deputy   auditor    for  two  and   one-half  years;   then 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2IJ 

coming  to  Bluffton,  Minnesota,  he  aided  in  the  establishment  of  the  State 
Rank  of  Bluffton,  Minnesota,  an  institution  of  which  he  was  made  cashier, 
a  position  which  he  now  occupies,  and  one  which  he  holds  in  a  most  efficient 
and  capable  manner. 

On  May  22,  [911,  Joseph  \.  Otte  was  married  to  Alice  Granger,  and 
has  made  for  himself  and  his  wife  an  excellent  home,  the  hospitality  of  which 
is  well  known  throughout  the  community.  Joseph  A.  Otte  and  his  wife  are 
members  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church. 

Not  only  in  the  financial  world  is  Joseph  A.  Otte  a  success  hut  in  agri- 
cultural life,  as  the  owner  of  a  large  farm,  consisting  of  one  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  of  well  cultivated  land,  in  Blowers  township  and,  also  as  the 
holder  of  considerable  stock  in  the  State  Bank  of  Bluffton,  this  worthy  man 
has  shown  himself  to  be  of  a  type  of  which  the  locality  may  be  proud. 

In  public  life  Joseph  A.  Otte  has  not  neglected  his  duty  as  a  citizen  111 
the  community,  hut  has  given  of  his  valuable  time  freely  for  the  promotion 
of  local  interests  and  he  is  now  serving  the  village  of  Bluffton  as  its  village 
clerk,  in  an  unselfish  and  progressive  manner,  as  is  characteristic  of  this 
man  whom  all  delight  to  honor  ami  to  whose  character  and  worth  all  are 
willing  to  attest. 


HENRY  P.   NELSON. 


Henry  1'.  Nelson,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Aurdal  township.  Otter  Tail 
county.  Minnesota,  was  born  on  the  old  Aurdal  township  farm,  August  10, 
[888;  and  is  the  son  of  Xels  E.  and  Methe  (  Ilallan)  Nelson,  both  of  whom 
were  born  in  Norway,  the  former  on  December  17.  1S44.  and  the  latter  on 
January  6,   1850. 

Xels  hi.  Nelson's  parents  were  Ingebret  and  Aaste  Nelson,  both  of 
whom  were  born  in  Norway  and  who  came  to  America  and  settled  in  Aur- 
dal township  in  [868.  They  took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixtv 
acres  and  both  died  on  the  homestead  farm.  Mr.  Nelson's  father  came 
from  Norway  to  Minnesota  with  his  parents.  He  settled  in  Goodhue  county 
and  was  also  a  pioneer  in  Mirdal  township.  Later  be  look  up  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  land  and  made  many  improvements  upon  the  farm,  which 
he  acquired  from  the  government.  \fter  having  made  a  large  quantity  of 
brick,  he  erected  a  magnificent  brick  residence  on  the  farm  and  lived  111 
this  home  until  his  death,  in  1900.  His  widow  is  still  living.  The)  were 
the  parents  of  five  children,  Peter,  Haldon,  \nna.  Xels  and  Henn  P.  Mr. 
Nelson's  parents  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church 

Henry  P.  Nelson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Mirdal  town- 
ship and  reared  on  tin  farm  which  his  parents  owned  Mr.  Nelson  himself 
owns  a    farm   of  one  hundred   and   sixty   acres   of  land    in     Mirdal   township, 


214  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

which  is  a  part  of  the  old  homestead.  He  also  owns  other  land  in  this 
county.  In  1911  Mr.  Nelson  built  a  splendid  home  on  the  farm.  He  1-  a 
general  farmer  and  stockman  and  has  heen  very  successful  although  he  is 
still  a  young  man. 

On  June  28,  1913,  Henry  P.  Nelson  was  married  to  Emma  Bye,  the 
daughter  of  Stephen  and  Betsy  Bye,  and  who  was  horn  in  Sverdrup  town- 
ship. Mrs.  Nelson's  parents  were  early  settlers  of  Sverdrup  township.  They 
have  one  sun,  Searle  LeRoy,  who  was  born  on  March  29,  1914. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nelson  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 


NELS  N.  ROVANG. 


A  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  during  the  campaigns  of  which  he  made  an 
enviable  record,  a  pioneer  citizen  of  Otter  Tail  county,  who  did  much  to 
make  the  district  habitable  in  the  early  days,  a  citizen  who  in  the  public  life 
of  Tumuli  township  has  shown  himself  to  be  a  man  of  much  worth,  and  one 
whose  general  life  in  the  community  has  been  such  as  to  win  for  him  a  host 
of  friends  and  admiring  fellow  citizens  who  delight  in  honoring  his  name,  no 
record  of  life  or  review  of  events  in  Otter  Tail  county  would  be  complete 
without  reference  to  the  career  of  Nels  N.  Rovang,  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Nels  N.  Rovang  was  born  in  Norway  on  July  [9,  iN,y>.  the  son  of  Nels 
and  Anna  (Halverson)  Olson  Rovang.  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Norway, 
where  they  made  their  home  until  the  year  1850,  when  they  came  to  America 
and  located  near  the  town  of  Madison,  Wisconsin,  living  there  for  two  years 
and  then  moved  near  the  town  of  Decorah.  Iowa,  where  Nels  Rovang  bought 
a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  on  which  he  farmed  for  about 
five  years  and  then  sold  his  place  and  went  to  Wabash  county.  Minnesota, 
there  buying  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  United  States  government  land, 
for  which  lie  paid  the  sum  of  one  dollar  and  twenty-live  cents  per  acre.  There, 
on  a  farm  which  he  had  improved  until  it  was  one  of  the  most  desirable  of 
the  township,  the  elder  Rovang  and  his  wife  spent  their  last  days.  Nels  and 
Anna  Rovang  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  two  of  whom  were  veterans 
of  the  Civil  War:  Nels  N.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  who  served  until  the 
end  of  the  war.  with  Company  A.  Third  Regiment  Minnesota  Volunteer 
Infantry,  and  Christ,  who  served  nearly  tour  years  with  Company  C,  Tenth 
Regiment,  Minnesota  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  who  was  killed  in  action  at 
Nashville,    Tennessee. 

Following  his  service  in  the  Civil  War.  Nels  N.  Rovang  returned  to 
Wabasha  county.  Minnesota,  and  in  partnership  with  a  brother-in-law,  boughl 
one  hundred  and  sixty  aires  of  land,  on  which  they  farmed  for  two  years  and 
then  selling  their  land,  the)  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  in  the 
year   [868,  and  located  in  'Tumuli  township,  where   Nels  N.    Rovang  home- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  215 

steaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  southeast  of  the  town  of  Dal- 
ton,  where  he  now  lives  in  retirement  with  a  son,  who  operates  the  farm. 

On  November  29,  1865,  Nels  N.  Rovang  was  married  to  Ingeborg 
Johnson  Dahlager,  who  was  born  in  Norway,  and  who  came  to  America  and 
settled  in  the  state  of  Iowa  with  her  parents,  who  were  farmers.  To  the 
marriage  of  Nels  N.  and  Ingeborg  Rovang  were  born  the  following  children: 
Martin,  Anna.  John,  Julia,  Christian,  Emma  and  Otto.  Mr.  Rovang  and 
his  family  are  affiliated  with  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  a  congregation 
in  which  they  are  highly  respected  and  esteemed  for  their  lives  and  for  their 
work-  in  support  of  the  creeds  and  policies  of  this  denomination. 

In  the  public  and  official  life  of  Tumuli  township,  Nels  N.  Rovang  is  a 
citizen  with  a  long  and  honorable  record  as  a  public  servant,  he  having 
served  for  eight  years  as  treasurer  of  Tumuli  township,  and  for  some  years 
occupied  the  office  of  township  supervisor,  during  which  time  much  was  done 
for  the  progress  and  advancement  of  the  township  and  the  county.  Nels  N". 
Rovang  is  among  the  esteemed  citizens  of  the  county. 


CASPER  LEIN. 


few  men  111  the  community  life  of  Oscar  township,  this  county,  have 
taken  a  more  active  part  in  the  civic  affairs  of  that  community  than  has 
Casper  Lein,  a  well-known  and  prosperous  retired  farmer  of  that  section 
of  the  county,  who  since  1871  has  been  a  resident  of  Otter  Tail  county. 
Successful  in  hi-  Farming  ventures,  Mr.  Lein  also  has  been  prominently  con- 
nected with  other  enterprises  of  a  profitable  character  and  is  regarded  as  one 
of  the  most  substantial  men  in  his  community.  Eor  some  years  he  has  been 
living  a  life  of  retirement  from  the  active  duties  of  the  farm,  his  broad 
acres  long  ago  having  been  turned  over  to  his  sturdy  sons  and  he  is  now 
"taking  life  easy." 

Casper  Lein  was  born  in  the  kingdom  of  Norway  on  January  7.  [842, 
son  of  Jacob  Lein,  a  fanner  and  deep-sea  fisherman,  who  came  to  America 
in  hi-  latter  days  and  died  in  Iowa,  while  on  a  visit  to  his  son,  P>.  M.  Lein, 
in  that  -late.  Jacob  Lein  and  hi-  wife  were  the  parents  of  seven  children, 
namely:  John  1'..  who  i-  living  at  lb.lt,  tbi-  state;  P..  M..  deceased;  Casper, 
the  immediate  subject  of  tbi-  biographical  -ketch:  Jonas,  who  lives  in  Iowa: 
Mary,  who  lives  in  Pipestone  comity,  this  state;  Christina,  who  live-  in  the 
eastern  part  of  Montana,  and  Martin,  who  lives  in  Burleigh  county,  North 
Dakota.  Jacob  Lein  and  his  wife,  Maltie,  were  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  and  their  children  grew  up  in  the  strict  observance  of  the  tenets  of 
that   faith. 

Reared  and  educated  in  hi-  native  country,  Casper  Lein  did  not  .-me 


2IO  OTTER     TAIL    COTNTY.     MIXXKSOT.V. 

to  America  until  he  was  twenty-six  years  of  age.  It  was  in  [868  that  he 
lam  led  in  Quebec,  shortly  thereafter  entering  the  United  States,  proceeding 
to  Iowa,  where  for  about  two  years  he  remained  in  Winneshiek  county, 
engaged  as  a  farm  laborer.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  decided  to  home- 
stead a  farm  in  Minnesota  and  with  that  end  in  view  came  to  Otter  Tail 
eount\.  the  long  journey  being  made  by  ox-team.  Arriving  in  this  county, 
he  pre-empted  one  hundred  and  sixty-three  acres  in  (  )scar  township  and  pro- 
ceeded to  make  a  home  for  himself  and  his  wife,  he  having  married  in 
Iowa,  in  [869,  Christine  Moe,  who  also  was  horn  in  Norway,  and  who 
through  all  their  years  of  activity  in  this  county  has  proved  a  competent  and 
valuable  helpmate  to  him.  Prom  the  ven  -tart,  Casper  Lein  prospered  and 
as  he  became  financially  able  added  from  time  to  tune  to  his  land  holdings 
until  at  one  time  he  was  the  owner  of  four  hundred  acres  of  choice  land 
surrounding  his  home.  As  he  retired  from  the  active  life  of  the  farm. 
however,  he. disposed  of  a  part  of  this  and  turned  the  remainder  over  to 
his  children,  who  are  now  managing  tin-  estate,  he  making  his  home  with 
his  son,  Oscar,  on  the  old  home  place. 

To  Casper  and  Christine  (Moe)  I. em  nine  children  have  been  horn, 
Olaf,  John.  Nicoline,  Bernard,  Sophia.  Carl,  Oscar.  Matilda  and  Attin.  Mr. 
and    Mr>.    Lein   are  active  and   prominent   members  of   the    Lutheran   church 

m  their  neighborh 1,  of  which  Mr.  Lein  has  been  the  treasurer  for  the  past 

thirty-four  years,  and  their  children  were  brought  up  to  the  faithful  observ- 
ance of  the  tenets  of  that  faith.  Active  in  all  neighborhood  good  works. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lein  long  have  been  held  in  the  warmest  esteem  throughout 
that  pari  of  the  county  and  no  one  thereabout  has  more  friends  than  have 
they. 

For  years  Casper  Lein  has  served  the  public  faithfully  and  well  as  a 
justice  of  the  peace  in  Oscar  township  and  since  1S85  has  been  clerk  of  the 
school  district.  From  [873  to  [906  he  served  as  clerk  of  the  township  and 
for  thirty-eight  years  was  the  township  assessor.  He  was  postmaster  from 
[900  to  [906,  at  Oscar.  During  several  decades  Ik-  served  the  government 
as  a  collector  of  census  statistics  and  also  assisted  several  times  in  taking 
the  census  of  the  state  of  Minnesota.  For  twelve  years  he  was  the  secre- 
tary-treasurer of  the  Oscar  Township  Farmers  Mutual  Insurance  Associa- 
tion and  is  still  serving  as  one  of  the  directors  of  that  excellent  organization. 
lie  also  is  a  stockholder  111  the  Carlisle  Elevator  Company  and  owns  a  good- 
sized  block  of  stock  111  the  Carlisle  Hank  as  well  as  in  the  Scandinavian 
Bank  of  Fergus  Falls.  The  civic  distinctions  which  have  come  to  Mr.  Lein 
during  his  long  and  busy  life  in  this  county  are  ample  evidences  of  the 
regard  in  which  he  is  held  generally  in  the  community  and  his  friends  very 
properly  are  proud  of  the   honors  which  have  been  bestowed   upon  him. 


OTTEK    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2\J 

JOHN  SANFRED  KALLERMAN. 

Born  in  Sweden,  the  scion  of  a  sturdy  race  of  fanners,  swindled  out  of 
the  possession  of  his  farm  in  Sweden,  a  penniless  emigrant  to  the  United 
States,  and  now  a  retired  farmer  living  in  Wadena,  Otter  Tail  county,  Min- 
nesota, ami  a  man  who  has  the  satisfaction  id'  knowing  that  his  has  been  a 
successful  career  m  the  agricultural  life  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  that  to  him- 
self alone  is  due  the  success  which  he  s, .  deservedly  has  won — such,  in  brief, 
is  the  life  of  the  person  whose  name  forms  the  caption  of  this  biographical 
review. 

John  Sanfred  Kallerman  was  horn  in  Skaraborgsland,  Sweden,  at  the 
picturesque  village  of  Skofde,  on  December  23,  1840,  the  son  of  James  Olson 
and  Cajsallesa  Johnson,  both  natives  of  Sweden,  the  former  born  in  1809 
and  the  latter  in  1813.  Both  were  reared  to  manhood  and  womanhood  and 
married  in  Skaraborgsland.  Jonas  Olson  came  in  possession  of  the  farm 
upon  which  his  ancestors  had  lived  for  so  many  generations  and  devoted 
himself  to  general  farming.  Both  he  and  his  helmed  wife  died  on  the  old 
homestead,  the  former  in  1878  and  the  latter  in  [889.  To  Jonas  Olson  and 
Cajsallesa  Johnson  were  born  four  children,  as  follow:  Lorenzo,  who  1-  .1 
prosperous  and  successful  farmer  living  on  a  farm  in  Sweden;  Matilda,  who 
married  John  Larson  and  lives  in  Sweden;  John  Sanfred  Kallerman,  the  sub- 
ject of  this  sketch;  and  Franz  August,  a  major  in  the  Swedish  army,  who 
lives  at  Stockholm. 

John  Sanfred  Kallerman  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Sweden 
and  later  pursued  his  secondary  education  in  the  high  school  of  his  native 
land.  Being  reared  on  the  farm,  he  early  in  life  became  a  farmer  and  followed 
husbandry  for  a  time.  Later,  however,  he  became  a  grocer  in  Sodertulge, 
near  Stockholm,  in  the  meantime  retaining  his  farm,  which  bore  the  name  of 
"Bambersfik."  Having  received  an  offer  to  trade  his  farm  for  a  larger  farm 
located  in  the  south  of  Sweden,  he  accepted  the  offer  only  to  find  to  his  loss 
that  he  had  been  swindled  and  could  never  recover  the  farm  for  which  In- 
had  traded,  thereby  losing  a  sum  equivalent  to  ten  thousand  dollars.  Now  a 
poor  man,  he  emigrated  to  America  alone  and  after  a  perilous  trip  landed 
with  but  twenty  cents  in  his  possession. 

Mr  Kallerman  came  immediately  to  Wadena.  Minnesota,  and  worked 
for  various  railroad  companies,  boat  builders  and  on  neighboring  farms.  In 
the  same  fall,  on  October  12.  [886,  bis  beloved  wife  and  his  two  sons  joined 
him  in  his  new  home,  and  in  1SS7  he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  section  1  _>.  of  Bluffton  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  At  the  time  tins 
land  was  wild,  uncultivated  and  covered  with  a  heaw  brush  There  were  no 
mads  or  other  improvements.  After  building  a  log  cabin  on  the  same  loca 
tion  as  the  present   site  of  the  country  home,   he  began   to  clear   the   land   anil 


2l8  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.;     MINNESOTA. 

to  put  it  to  cultivation.  Later  he  added  new  buildings  and  began  to  spe- 
cialize in  the  raising  of  cattle.  Still  later  he  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  adjoining  his  original  tract,  eighty  acres  in  section  t  and  forty  acres  in 
section  12,  of  Bluffton  township.  About  the  year  1912  he  sold  his  farm 
to  his  two  sons,  and-  for  twenty  years  operated  a  threshing  outfit  and  saw- 
mill, at  the  expiration  of  which  time  he  retired  and  moved  to  Wadena,  where 
he  bought  a  home  and  invested  in  other  real  estate. 

On  November  r6,  1875,  John  Sanfred  Kallerman  was  married  to  Sophia 
Emily  Anderson,  a  native  of  Sweden  and  the  daughter  of  Anders  Bengtson 
Carlhon.  To  this  happy  union  there  have  been  horn  two 
'.  and  Matteas  L.,  who  purchased  and  have  operated  their 
Bluffton  township.  Allen  F.  has  been  prominent  in  local 
erved  as  township  clerk. 

John  Sanfred  Kallerman.  as  a  Democrat,  has  held  man)'  local  political 
offices,  including  township  supervisor,  school  director  and  delegate  to  the 
>tate  convention,  and  has  filled  all  positions  to  the  entire  satisfaction  of  his 
constituency.  His  interest  in  local  politics  has  been  a  deep  one  and  ever 
directed  toward  the  public  welfare.  Both  he  and  his  beloved  wife  are  devoted 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  To  him  is  tendered  the  respect  and  confi- 
dence of  a  bust  of  friends  and  the  admiration  of  the  good  citizens  of  Bluffton 
ti  iwnship. 

Mr.  Kallerman  has  at  various  times  been  a  public  school  official  and  has 
always  been  a  strong  supporter  of  free  public  education.  He  is  opposed  to 
various  systems  of  private  and  parochial  schools  and  has  expressed  the  hope 
that  all  parochial  schools  may  be  abolished. 


and    Bri 

ta    Mari; 

children 

.  Allen 

father's 

farm  ii 

politics 

and  has 

O.  T.  SUTTER. 


One  of  the  well-known  fanners  of  Compton  township,  this  county,  was 
().  J.  Sutler,  a  native  of  Sweden,  who  died  on  September  [9,  1  <j T 4,  at  the 
age  oi  sixty-nine  years.  The  late  <  ).  J.  Sutter  was  married  at  the  tune  he 
came  to  America,  in  i<XNj.  The  Sutter  family  came  to  this  country  in  com 
pany  with  the  Johnson  family,  who  were  also  early  settlers  of  <  ompton  town- 
ship, (  >tter  Tail  county.  After  landing  in  America,  the  Sutter  family  moved 
to  Wadena.   Minnesota,  but  later  settled  on  the    farm  where  the  family  now 


In  the  spring  of   1882,  after  arriving  i 

n  the  state  of  Minnesota,  the  late 

1 '■  1 

Sutter  purchased  a  homestead  right  1 

if  eight)   acres   fr0m   Mels    \nder- 

son, 

and.  at   the  time  of  his  death.   111   Sepl 

liiibcr.    Mil  |.   bad   about   i  me  hun- 

dred 

acres  of   land.      The    farm   was   all    w 

ild   land    when   the   Slitters   settled 

upon 

it,  nearly   thirtv-five   vears  ago,  and 

O.    J.    Sutter   made   most    of    the 

improvement     on  the  farm. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2IO, 

Of  the  six  children  born  to  O.  J.  Sutter  and  wife,  two  are  married, 
Anna  and  John.     The  other  children  are  Matilda,  Olaf,  Mea  and  Charles. 

O.  J.  Sutter  was  one  of  the.  organizers  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church, 
of  Compton  township,  and,  for  many  years,  was  one  of  the  deacons  in  the 
church.  He  was  also  a  Sunday  school  teacher  and  superintendent  of  the 
Sunday  school.  Mr.  Sutter  was  not  interested  in  politics,  but  devoted  prac- 
tically all  of  his  time  and  energy  to  his  family,  his  home,  his  church  and  his 
farm. 

Olaf  Sutter  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Compton  township 
and  also  at  Northwestern  College,  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  which  he 
attended  after  finishing  the  common  school  course. 

Upon  completing  a  two-years'  course  at  Northwestern  College,  Mr. 
Sutter  returned  to  the  farm  and  has  lived  there  ever  since.  Olaf  Sutter  is 
now  the  town  clerk  and  is  an  ardent  Republican  in  politics.  He  belongs  to 
the  Lutheran  church. 


OLOF  PARY. 


Perhaps  no  citizen  of  New  York  Mills,  or  of  Otter  Tail  county,  has 
served  his  community  more  unselfishly,  or  to  greater  or  to  more  permanent 
and  practical  good,  than  has  Olof  I'arv.  pioneer  business  man.  philanthropist 
and  honored  man  of  New  York  Mills.  Public  spirited,  benevolent  and  tenac- 
ious in  his  determination  that  Otter  Tail  county  should  have  those  things 
without  which  it  could  not  reach  its  present  state  of  prosperity,  and  ever 
ready  to  make  personal  sacrifice  for  the  realization  of  his  patriotic  ambitions 
in  the  interests  of  his  locality,  he  is  today  one  of  the  most  esteemed  citizens 
in  the  county. 

Olof  I'arv  was  born  in  the  northern  part  of  Finland,  very  near  to  Lap- 
land, on  July  7,  1852,  the  sun  of  Olof  and  Annie  Margaret  (  Halvor)  Pary, 
who  were  born  at  that  place,  the  father  on  October  21,  181 4.  and  the  mother 
on  November  25,  1S22.  Olof  Pary,  Sr.,  was  a  farmer  of  his  native  land, 
working  on  his  own  land,  until  the  year  1871,  when  witli  his  wife  and  five 
children,  he  came  to  America  and  went  to  the  town  of  Michigammi,  Michi- 
gan, where  lie  was  employed  generally  for  some  years,  and  then,  in  the  year 
1NN7.  be  came  to  (liter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  bis  son.  Olof,  who 
bad  preceded,  was  living.  \t  this  place  Olof  Pary,  Sr.,  lived  in  retirement 
until  be  died,  on  January  30,  1904,  bis  wife,  Annie,  surviving  him  until  her 
death,  on  January  1  (.,  [910.  Olof  and  \nnie  Pary  were  the  parents  of  the 
Following  children:  Abraham,  a  fanner  of  Otter  Tail  county,  who  is 
deceased:  Olof,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Henry,  a  farmer  of  Newton  town- 
ship; Lizzie,  who  married  Theodore  Anderson  ami  lives  in   Newton  town- 


220  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

ship;  and  Mary,  who  married  Isaac  Peterson,  who  died,  and  who  later  mar- 
ried John  Majava,  and  they  live  in  Newton  township. 

Olof  Pary  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Finland  and  in  the 
public  schools  of  Michigammi,  .Michigan,  after  which  he  worked  for  seven 
years  on  railroads  of  the  state  of  Michigan  and  in  Canada,  and  then,  during 
the  year  1881.  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  arriving  on  July  14, 
and  shortly  following  which  he  established  a  store  at  a  small  unsurveyed 
settlement,  which  later  became  the  present  town  of  New  York  Mills.  At  the 
time  of  his  settlement  at  New  York  Mills,  Olof  Pary  found  but  two  .-lores 
being  conducted,  one  known  as  the  Winslow  store  and  the  other  known  as 
the  Blowers  store,  both  of  which  are  places  of  history  now. 

After  fourteen  years  as  a  merchant  Olof  Pary  invested  in  the  stock  of 
a  flour-mill  at  Washburn,  North  Dakota,  a  concern  with  which  he  was  identi- 
fied for  about  three  years.  In  [898  he  sold  his  interests  and  joined  the  gold 
seekers  of  Alaska,  in  which  country  he  remained  for  three  years,  during 
which  time  he  conducted  a  general  store  and  at  the  same  time  worked  on 
claims,  after  which  he  returned  to  New  York  Mills,  where  he  lived  for  a 
time,  lie  then  went  to  the  state  of  Washington,  where  for  about  five  years 
he  was  a  prospector  for  gold  and  copper,  and  then,  in  the  year  1908,  Olof 
Pary  again  became  a  merchant  of  Xew  York  Mills,  a  business  which  he  fol- 
lowed for  some  time  and  then  he  purchased  the  Farmers'  Mercantile  Asso- 
ciation, which  he  conducted  until  selling  to  (diaries  A.  Matala.  when  he 
retired  from  active  business  life. 

During  the  year  [874  Olof  Pary  was  married  to  Sarah  Bippo,  who 
was  born  in  Finland,  the  daughter  of  John  Bippo  and  wife.  Sarah  (  Bippo) 
Pary  died  in  the  year  1004.  she  being  the  mother  of  one  child,  John,  who 
grew  to  maturity,  and  is  now  a  business  man  in  Duluth,  Minnesota.  Olof 
Pary  was  married,  secondly,  during  the  year  [908,  to  Sarah  1'.  Warner,  the 
daughter  of  S.  J.  Warner  and  wife,  who  were  early  settlers  in  the  state  of 
Ohio,  but  who  later  moved  to  Springfield,  Illinois,  where  they  lived  the 
remainder  of  their  lives.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Warner  were  the  parents  of  eight 
children,  as  follow:  Joseph  P.,  Mrs.  M.  T.  Swinney,  Charles  K..  Mrs. 
Annie  Belle  Killins,  William  Woodrow,  Mrs.  Sarah  Pary,  John  S.  and 
[•rank   S. 

Olof  Pary  has  been  known  throughout  the  history  of  Xew  York  Mills 
and  vicinity  as  .me  of  the  men  interested  in  the  developmenl  of  the  general 
interests  of  the  community,  and  of  these  interests  the  one  closest  to  the  heart 
of  this  public-spirited  citizen  has  been  the  matter  of  good  roads  for  the  town- 
ship and  for  the  county.  During  the  pioneer  days  of  Otter  Tail  county  when 
(Hot  Pan  settled  in  the  district  be.  with  Clinton  Fiske.  August  Sit/  and 
A.  S.  Rlowers,  were  the  township  board  which  not  only  assisted  in  the  laving 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  221 

Out  of  public  highways,  but  helped  in  the  labor  of  the  project,  and  gave  of 
their  money  that  (  Hter  Tail  count)'  might  he  better  opened  to  settlement  and 
to  intercourse  with  the  outside  world.  Olof  I'ary  has  served  his  township 
long  and  well  as  a  member  of  the  township  board,  and  with  the  spirit  oi  the 
true  patriot  has  steadily  refused  to  accept  remuneration  for  his  services,  pre- 
ferring to  give  of  his  efforts  and  of  his  judgment  and  experience  in  order 
that  the  community,  of  which  he  is  the  oldest  living  settler,  may  be  a  better 
place  for  posterit) . 

Olof  I'ary  is  a  man  of  important  and  conspicuous  affiliations,  not  only 
in  the  Republican  party,  of  which  he  is  a  supporter  and  which  he  has  repre- 
sented in  convention,  both  county  and  state,  but  in  the  local  offices  of 
president  of  the  school  board  and  as  a  member  of  the  town  council,  offices  to 
which  he  has  l>een  elected  almost  without  opposition,  and  without  seeking, 
and  in  fraternal  circles.  Olof  Par)-  is  prominently  associated  as  a  Mason,  an 
organization  in  which,  during  his  twenty-one  years  as  a  member,  he  has 
received  the  degrees  of  the  blue  lodge  No.  [59,  at  Perham,  and  the  Scottish 
Rite,  as  well  as  the  Shriner  honors,  at  Minneapolis. 

Olof  I'ary  is  a  supporter  of  all  the  churches  of  New  York  Mills,  he 
taking  interest  in  their  affairs  and  their  activities  and  lending  his  support. 
both  moral  and  financial,  to  their  work. 

The  life  of  Olof  I'ary  has  been  long  and  good,  of  great  service  to  his 
community,  and  one  which  will  make  an  important  part  of  the  history  of  life 
and  events  in  Otter  Tail  county. 


DANIEL    ANDERSON. 


Born  in  Sweden.  March  31,  [854,  Daniel  Anderson,  a  prosperous  farmer 
of  Compton  township,  is  the  son  of  A.  I ).  Sutter  and  Christina  Nelson,  who 
were  natives  of  Sweden.  Mr.  Anderson's  paternal  grandfather  was  also 
Daniel  Anderson  by  name,  who  died  in  Sweden,  where  be  was  a  farmer  1>\ 
occupation  and  where  he  owned  a  large  tract  of  land,  lie  was  a  member  of 
the  Lutheran  church. 

Mr.  Anderson's  father,  V  D.  Sutter,  was  a  farmer  111  the  old  country, 
and,  after  coming  to  America,  lived  retired.  lie  came  to  this  countn  in 
1883  and  lived  with  his  son.  Daniel  Anderson,  until  Ins  death,  m  November, 
[905,  His  wife  died  in  April,  mu.  They  were  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  and  reared  a  family  of  three  children,  of  whom  Daniel,  the  subject  of 
this  sketch,  was  the  eldest.     The  other  children   were   Margaret   and  Christine, 

Educated  in  the  public  school-,  of  the  old  country,  Daniel  Anderson  came 
to  America  i"  f88l  and,  after  landing  at  Philadelphia,  came  direct  to  Minne- 
sota.    Two  years  later  he  purchased  land  in  Compton  township,  this  county 


222  OTTEK    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

Mr.  Anderson  began  his  career  as  a  tanner  in  Compton  township  with  eighty 
acres  in  section  21,  which  Ik-  subsequently  increased  to  two  hundred  acres. 
but  -dine  of  it  lias  been  divided  among  his  suns,  lie  gave  eighty  acres  of 
his  farm  to  his  son.  A.  1).  Anderson,  and  eighty  acre-  to  his  sun.  W.  1'. 
Anderson. 

On  March  jo.  [880,  Daniel  Anderson  was  married  to  Christine  Xor- 
den,  a  native  of  Sweden,  and  to  them  have  been  horn  seven  children,  Andrew. 
John,  William,  Benjamin  (deceased),  Ella,  Manna  and  Amanda. 

Air.  and  Airs.  Daniel  Anderson  are  members  of  the  Mission  church. 
Air.  Anderson  has  served  as  supervisor  of  Compton  township  fur  six  years, 
but  is  no  longer  serving  in  this  office.  He  also  served  as  school  treasurer  for 
one  term  in  Compton  township.  Daniel  Anderson  is  a  prosperous  farmer,  a 
useful  citizen  and  is  popular  among  all  of  the  people  in  the  community  where 
he  resides  and  bv  whom  he  is  well  known. 


JOHN"   NORDIN. 


Born  in  Sweden  on  April  25,  [853,  John  Nordin,  a  well-to-do  fanner 
of  ( '.  mptoii  township,  owns  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  of  which 
his   father  at  one  time  owned  a  part. 

Air.  Xordin  is  a  son  of  John  Johnson  and  Carin  Matson  and  the  grand- 
son of  John  Johnson,  Sr.,  a  farmer  by  occupation,  who  owned  land  in  his 
native  country  of  Sweden.  The  paternal  grandfather  was  a  devout  member 
of  the  1  .utheran  church. 

In  1883  Air.  and  Airs.  John  Johnson,  the  parents  of  John  Xordin.  sold 
their  farm  in  Sweden  and  came  to  America,  locating  in  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  where  Air.  Nordin's  father  purchased  land  in  section  21.  of 
Compton  township,  lie  gradually  added  to  his  original  purchase  until  he 
was  the  owner  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  at  the  time  of  his  death. 
Mis  first  purchase  of  land  in  this  county  consisted  of  one  hundred  and  forty 
acres,  and  thi-  is  a  part  of  the  farm  upon  which  his  son,  John  Nordin,  now 
lives.  Mr.  Nordin's  father  had  received  military  training  in  bis  native  land, 
and  was  a  faithful  and  devout  member  of  the  Lutheran  church,  His  death 
occurred  in  December,  lN'j.v  his  wife  having  passed  away  previously,  in 
March.  [890.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  of  whom,  John,  the 
immediate  subject  of  this  review,  is  the  eldest.  Mat-,  the  next  youngest 
burn,  died  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years,  while  the  other  two  living  children  are 
t  'hri-tcna  and   Margaret. 

|ohn  Xonbn  received  a  liberal  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Sweden 
and  was  a  teacher  in  the  graded  schools  of  that  country  for  nine  years. 
Upon  coming  to  America  with  his  parents,  he  settled  with  them  on  the  farm 
w  here  he  i-  now   living. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  223 

Un  -March  25,  1880,  John  Nordiii  was  married  lu  Margaret  Anderson, 
who  is  also  a  native  of  Sweden,  and  to  this  union  have  been  born  rive  chil- 
dren, Axel,  lj.mil,  Robert,  Anna  and  Freda,  all  of  whom  are  living  at  home 
with  then  paients,  with  the  exception  of  Axel,  who  is  engaged  in  the  cement 
business  at  Wadena. 

In  1907  Air.  Nordin  built  a  splendid  new  barn,  thirty-rive  by  fifty  feel, 
and  111  1914  he  constructed  a  large  concrete  silo.  The  house  in  which  the 
family  lives  was  rebuilt  in  1914,  and  all  of  the  buildings  and  equipment 
about  the  farm  are  modern  and  up-to-date.  .Mr.  Xordin  is  a  dairy  farmer 
and  keeps  always  twelve  cows  or  more. 

The  Xordin  family  are  members  of  the  -Mission  church,  in  which  they 
lake  an  active  and  interested  part. 


JOHN  NORGREN. 


Conspicuous  among  American  citizens  from  Sweden  is  found  the  name 
of  John  Xorgren,  who  keeps  well  in  line  with  American  progress,  and  is  per- 
forming his  part  in  the  business  affairs  of  the  agricultural  district  of  Fergus 
Falls,  Minnesota,  where  he  has  won  for  himself  a  name  representing  industry 
and  energy,  and  where  he  has  become  a  potent  factor  along  agricultural  lines. 

John  Xorgren.  farmer,  Fergus  halls,  Elizabeth  township,  was  born  on 
February  8,  1845,  m  Sweden,  and  is  a  son  of  Magnus  Johnson,  the  name  of 
Xorgren  being  an  adopted  one,  and  was  taken  from  the  name  of  a  farm  in 
Sweden.  He  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Sweden,  and 
came  to  America  when  he  was  twenty-one  years  of  age.  landing  at  Xew  York 
in  1866,  coming  first  to  Minnesota,  after  which  he  went  to  Wisconsin,  where 
he  was  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  for  three  years,  at  the  end  of  which 
time  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Northern  Pacific  railroad  at  St.  Louis, 
Minnesota.  After  discontinuing  this  work,  .Mr.  Xorgren  followed  his  track- 
Mi"  stone  mason  for  three  years;  coming  to  Otter  Tail  county  in  April,  1N71. 
where  he  established  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  and  where 
he  still  resides,      lie  has  continued  to  add  to  his  property  until  he  now   owns 

two  hundred  and  nine  acres  of  g 1  agricultural  land,  one  hundred  and  sixty 

acres  in  section  14  and  Forty-nine  acres  in  section  4.  lie  divides  his  time 
and  attention  between  general  farming  and  stock  raising  of  all  kinds,  lie  has 
put  all  tin-  improvements  on  the  place,  including  ;; I  buildings  of  a  charac- 
ter to  correspond  with  the  general  surroundings,  giving  an  appearance  of 
care  and  prosperity  to  his  farm,  which  is  located  two  miles  from  the  town  of 
Elizabeth. 

Mr.  Morgren  is  a  Republican,  while  his  religious  sympathies  arc  with 
the  Lutheran   church,    which   he   built,   and    for   which   he   hauled   the   lumber 


224  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

with  an  ox  team,  tie  is  an  active  worker  in  the  church,  of  which  he  has  been 
the  leader  for  the  past  fifteen  years,  lie  has  also  been  supervisor  of  the 
town  board  for  fifteen  years,  and  occupied  the  office  of  road  supervisor  for  a 
number  of  years. 

Magnus  Johnson,  father  of  .Mr.  Norgren,  was  a  native  of  Sweden, 
where  he  and  his  wife.  Marta  (Christina)  Johnson,  lived  and  died.  They 
were  farmers,  and  owned  a  tine  tract  of  land,  consisting  of  two  hundred  and 
eighty  acres.  They  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  of  which  Mr. 
Johnson  was  a  leader,  lie  was  a  well-informed  man.  who  always  kept  abreast 
with  the  times  in  his  community.  This  marriage  was  blest  with  eight  chil- 
dren: John,  Anna,  Christina.  Andrew,  John,  Eva,  Sarah  (deceased)  and 
<  itista.  Of  these  children.  Andrew.  John  and  Christina  were  the  only  ones 
who  came  to  America. 

|ohn  Norgren  was  united  in  marriage  on  June  7,  1^74.  with  Ellen  neck- 
man,  daughter  of  John  Beckman.  She  was  born  in  Sweden,  and  was  twelve 
years  old  when  she  came  with  her  parents  to  America.  This  union  has  been 
blest  with  the  following  children :  Clif,  Amanda,  Anna.  William.  Ida.  Rosie. 
\lfred.  Elf,  and  two  who  died  in  infancy.  Charles,  \ndrew  .  Amanda  and 
Anna  l>eing  the  only  married  ones. 

John  Beckman,  father  of  Mrs.  John  Norgren,  was  horn  in  Sweden,  and 
on  his  arrival  in  America  located  in  Otter  Tail  countv,  Minnesota. 


1'  \CI.    \.  STORTROEN. 

Paul  A.  Stortroen.  treasurer  of  Otter  Tad  county  for  the  past  sixteen 
years,  and  a  well-known  and  highly  respected  citizen  of  this  comity,  is  a 
native  of  Martel  township,  Pierce  county,  Wisconsin,  where  his  birth 
occurred  on  (  >ctober  22,    [864. 

Mr  Stortroen  is  ,1  son  of  \nders  J.  and  Sigri  (Bjerkeng)  Stortroen, 
the  former  of  whom  was  born  at  Tonset,  Osterdalen,  Norway,  and  who 
came  to  America  about  1848,  in  company  with  his  brother.  Anders  J. 
Stortroen  located  in  Pierce  county,  Wisconsin,  where  he  lived  until  iN,X_v  in 
winch  year  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  purchased  land  in  the  Aastad 
neighborhood,  where  he  farmed  until  [902,  when  he  retired  and  moved  to 
Fergus  Falls,  where  he  spent  the  remainder  (if  hi-  life  and  where  Mr.  Stort- 
roen's  mother  1-  still  living. 

Paul  A.  Stortroen  was  educated  in  the  schools  -1  Fergus  halls,  and 
after  his  graduation  from  the  high  school  was  engaged  for  five  vears  as  a 
teacher  in  this  county.  He  made  a  most  commendable  record  as  an  instructor 
and  was  popular  with  school  officials  and  with  the  patrons  and  pupils  of  the 
various  communities  in  which  he  taught.      At  the  end  of  five  vears  of  this 


UTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  22$ 

valuable  form  of  public  service,  Mr.  Stortroen  was  appointed  as  a  clerk  in 
the  office  of  the  register  of  deeds  at  Fergus  Falls,  which  position  he  held 
tor  four  years.  Afterwards  he  was  appointed  deputy  auditor  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  and  served  as  clerk  in  the  auditor's  office  for  a  period  of  eight  years, 
lie  then  spent  a  year  on  the  farm,  but  in  1899  was  again  called  to  official 
life,  having  been  elected  treasurer  of  the  county,  a  position  which  he  now 
In ilds.  For  a  quarter  of  a  century  Mr.  Stortroen  has  been  prominent  in 
the  political  life  of  Otter  Tail  county,  and  is  today  well  known  among  all 
classes  of  people. 

By  lii s  marriage  to  Martha  Tuve,  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  Mr.  Stort- 
roen has  had  two  children,  Arthur  and  Noble,  both  of  whom  are  living  at 
home  with  their  parents.  The  family  are  earnest  and  devoted  members 
of  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  church,  and  are  prominent  workers  in  that 
denomination,  being  regular  attendants  at  the  services  and  liberal  con- 
trihutors  to  the  support  of  the  church. 

AUGUST  SCHMIDT. 

August  Schmidt,  retired  fanner  of  New  York  Mills,  Otter  Tail  count}-, 
Minnesota,  was  horn  in  Germany,  December  21,  1858,  the  son  of  Henry  and 
Sophia  (Broemme)  Schmidt,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germany.  In 
[872  Henry  Schmidt  came  to  America  and  located  in  Sibley  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  lived  for  one  year  and  then  went  to  Redwood  county,  where 
he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  on  which  he  lived  for 
some  time,  after  which  he  disposed  of  his  land  and  went  to  Lamberton, 
where  he  died  in  the  year  [913,  his  widow,  Sophia,  surviving  him  until  1914. 
Henry  and  Sophia  Schmidt  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  August,  Fred, 
Dora.  Frank,  .Minnie.   Pauline,  Alvine  and  Emma. 

August  Schmidt  came  to  America,  with  his  parents,  when  fourteen  years 
of  age.  and  after  his  school  days  he  came  to  New  York  Mills,  near  where  he 
bought  a  farm  of  four  hundred  acres,  located  in  Homestead  township,  a 
place  which  he  improved  extensivelj  and  where  he  lived  until  the  vear  [914, 
when  he  retired  from  active  life  and  moved  to  the  town  of  New  York  Mills. 
Mr.  Schmidt  has  a  good  and  convenient  home  in  New  York  Mill-,  where  he 
now  lives  a  quiet  life. 

During  tin-  year  [88]  Augusl  Schmidt  was  married  to  Dora  Hoche, 
who  was  horn  in  Germany,  where  her  parents  lived  their  entire  life  I-  the 
marriage  of  August  and  Dora  Schmidt  were  bom  the  following  children. 
Herman.   Frank.  Louise.  Hulda,    \tnanda.   Walter,    Fredonia  and  YValdemer. 

August  Schmidt  has  been  prominently  connected  with  the  official  life  of 
hi<    community,    having   served    as    supervisor   of    Homestead    township    for 


226  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

twelve  years  and  for  a  number  of  years  was  chairman  of  the  board  of  super- 
visors. The  part  taken  by  Mr.  Schmidt  has  done  much  to  make  the  com- 
munity better  and  more  progressive  among  the  townships  of  the  county. 


PETER  BTORKLUND. 


Peter  Bjorklund,  a  prominent  farmer  of  Henning  township,  this  count), 
was  born  in  Sweden  on  January  13,  1 S 5 5 .  As  the  distance  to  school  was  too 
far  he  was  educated  by  his  mother  at  home.  Mr.  Bjorklund  had  read  the 
Bible  through  several  times  before  he  came  to  America,  in  1867,  together 
with  his  parents.  He  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  in  187 1,  and, 
for  a  time,  attended  the  public  schools  of  this  county. 

Mr.  Bjorklund  took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in 
Henning  township,  where  he  now  lives.  He  has  added  to  this  land  from 
year  to  year  until  he  now  owns  six  hundred  and  eighty  acres,  besides  eighty 
acres  which  he  gave  to  his  son,  Oscar.  After  the  latter  had  received  eighty 
acres  from  his  father,  he  purchased  eighty  acres  and  erected  good  buildings 
upon  the  farm.  Oscar  Bjorklund  installed  the  first  milking  machine  in  Hen- 
ning township.  Mr.  Bjorklund's  farm  consists  of  five  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  his  home  farm  and  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  in  another  farm 
in  Henning  township.  He  is  a  general  farmer  and  stockman  and  a  well- 
known  breeder  of  Holstein  cattle. 

On  December  26,  1880,  Peter  Bjorklund  was  married  to  Alary  Larson, 
who  was  born  in  Norway  in  [862,  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Herbrant 
and  Borghild  Larson.  They  moved  to  Dodge  county  in  1869  and  later  to 
Eagle  Lake  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  where  Mrs.  Bjorklund's  father  died. 
Her  mother  died  near  Thief  River  Falls,  Minnesota.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bjork- 
lund have  been  the  parents  of  eleven  children,  of  whom  two,  Ida  and  Rich- 
ard, are  deceased.  The  living  children  are  Oscar,  Clara,  Hulda  and  \nna 
(twins),  Herbert,  Otto,  Robert,  Edgar  and  Edith. 

Mr.  Bjorklund  is  one  of  the  wealthiesl  farmers  of  Henning  township. 
He  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  for  thirty-five  war--.  The 
homestead  where  he  lives  was  pre-empted  in  1X70  and  two  years  later  he 
got  married  and  moved  onto  the  farm,  lie  has  been  a  member  of  the  town- 
ship board  for  main  years,  serving  as  treasurer,  supervisor  and  chairman 
of  the  board  and  president  of  the  borne  telephone  line.  The  Bjorklund-  are 
members  of  the  Swedish  Baptist  church  at  Henning  and  are  very  active  in 
religious  work. 

Mr.  Bjorklund's  brother.  August,  who  lives  in  Henning  township,  is  also 
a  prominent  farmer.  He  was  born  in  Sweden  on  July  8,  1862,  and  was  four 
years  old   when  the  familv  came  to  America,      lie  was  reared  in  Eagle  Lake 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  227 

township  and  attended  the  public  schools.  He  bought  the  old  homestead  of 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  and  added  eighty  acres  to  the  farm.  In  19 12 
he  sold  the  farm  and  moved  to  Henning  township,  where  he  purchased  two 
hundred  and  forty  acres  in  section  1.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  August  Bjorklund  are 
members  of  the  Swedish  Baptist  church  at  Henning.  While  a  resident  of 
Eagle  Lake,  August  Bjorklund  served  on  the  school  board  and,  for  thirteen 
years,  was  township  clerk.  He  also  served  twelve  years  as  justice  of  the 
peace  and  twenty-five  years  as  assessor.  For  two  years  he  was  postmaster 
of  his  home  town. 

On  December  31,  1891,  August  Bjorklund  was  married  to  Anna  Smith, 
the  daughter  of  Olof  and  Mary  Smith,  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  To 
them  have  been  born  five  children,  Erwin,  Roy,  Earl,  Reuben  and  Gladys,  all 
of  whom  are  living  except  Earl,  who  is  deceased. 

Both  Peter  and  August  Bjorklund  are  enterprising  farmers,  well  known 
and  popular  citizens.  They  have  done  much  in  behalf  of  the  material  devel- 
opment of  Eagle  Lake  and  of  Henning  townships  and  both  enjoy  the  confi- 
dences of  a  host  of  friends  in  Otter  Tail  county. 


H.  H.  STONE. 


H.  H.  Stone  has  been  a  resident  of  Otter  Tail  county  since  1900,  com- 
ing here  when  he  was  sixteen  years  old.  After  attending  the  high  school  at 
Fnlda  and  the  St.  Cloud  Normal,  he  taught  school  for  five  years  in  this 
county  and  at  the  same  time  worked  on  the  farm.  Tn  191 1  he  discontinued 
teaching  and  since  that  time  has  given  his  entire  attention  to  the  cultivation 
of  the  soil.  The  year  previous  to  that  he  had  purchased  over  eighty  acres 
and  now  owns  the  southeast  quarter  of  section  2,  in  Elmo  township.  He 
engages  in  general  farming  and  is  a  breeder  of  Galloway  cattle  and  Duroc- 
Jersey  hogs,  having  ten  of  the  former  and  of  the  latter  one  hundred. 

On  October  30.  if)io.  H.  H.  Stone  was  married  to  Ethel  L.  Sparks,  ai 
Minneapolis.  His  wife  is  a  native  of  Miller.  South  Dakota,  but  has  lived  in 
this  county  since  [902,  and  is  a  daughter  of  M.  M.  Sparks,  at  present  a  resi- 
dent of  Parkers  Prairie,  where  lie  is  engaged  in  the  garage  business.  H.  FT. 
Stone  ami  wife  have  two  children,  Martha  Kate,  born  on  October  s.  i<)ii. 
and  Sylvia  Beth,  born  on  December  17.  1012.  Tn  1914  Mr.  Stone  erected  a 
line  new  barn,  sixty-two  by  thirty-two  feet,  having  a  hip  roof  and  concrete 
foundation. 

Mr.  Stone  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  of  the 
Royal  Neighbors,  and  the  Modern  Brotherhood  of  America,  lie  was  census 
taker  in  the  year  toio  and  since  that  time  has  been  assessor,  lie  was.  from 
the  organization  of  district    No.   275,   clerk,   his  period  of  office  extending 


OTTEK    TAIL    COt'NTY,     MINNESOTA. 


from  1907  to  the  present  time.  .Mr.  Stone  is  secretary  of  the  Almora  Co- 
operative Creamery.  In  politics,  he  is  an  independent  voter.  Mr.  Stone's 
useful  life  is  a  striking  example  of  what  energy  and  perseverance  will  do, 
and  it  is  gratifying  that  now  he  is  able  to  enjoy  the  results  of  his  skill. 


HANS  C.  HANSON. 


Prom  the  roll  of  public-spirited  citizens,  whose  unselfish  interests  have 
done  great  things  for  the  development  of  the  county  and  for  their  more 
immediate  vicinities,  the  name  of  Hans  C.  Hanson,  of  New  York  Mills, 
Minnesota,  stands  out  conspicuously  as  one  who,  perhaps  has  done  greater 
service  for  the  public  improvement  of  his  home  town  and  for  the  promotion 
of  the  business  activities  of  bis  locality  than  any  other  of  these  desirable  and 
valued  citizens.  A  man  of  varied  experience  in  life,  one  with  broad  knowl- 
edge of  the  activities  of  the  business  world,  and  a  citizen  who  as  a  promoter 
and  as  an  organizer  has  proved  himself  as  one  of  unusual  ability,  this  review 
of  Otter  Tail  county  would  not  be  complete  without  reference  to  the  work 
and  achievements  of  this  worthy  citizen. 

Hans  C.  Hanson  was  born  in  Denmark  on  the  island  of  Fynn,  on  April 
1,  1859,  the  son  of  Rasmus  and  Alary  Hanson,  who  were  likewise  natives  of 
Denmark.  Rasmus  Hanson  is  well  known  in  his  community  for  his  record 
as  a  soldier  in  the  war  with  Germany,  when  he  received  a  medal  for  an  act 
of  bravery  in  cutting  chains  which  were  blockading  the  war  area  to  the  ships 
of  his  country.  In  private  life,  Rasmus  Hanson  was  a  farmer  and  land 
owner  of  Denmark,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  were  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church.  To  the  marriage  of  Rasmus  and  Alary  Hanson  were  horn  three 
children:  Hans,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Mary,  who  married  Andrew 
Hanson,  and  lives  at  Orlando,  Louisiana,  and  Anne,  who  is  married  and  lives 
mi  the  island  of  Langeland.  in  Denmark. 

Hans  ('.  Hanson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  land. 
where  he  attended  classes  until  fifteen  years  of  age  and  then  he  engaged  in 
general  farming,  until  the  year  1880.  when,  being  twenty-one  years  of  age, 
he  sailed  for  \111crica  and  landed  at  Xew  York  City,  on  his  birthday,  and 
immediately  Following  he  went  to  Rochester.  Minnesota,  where  he  worked 
on  a  farm  for  one  summer  and  then  took  up  work  for  an  elevator  company, 
at  the  same  time  attending  night  school  under  the  direction  of  a  friend,  who 
is  now  a  resident  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  \fter  two  years  Hans  C. 
I  [anson  engaged  in  work  at  the  Rochester  Iron  Works,  where  he  was  employed 
for  five  years,  and  then  resigned  to  accepl  a  place  on  the  police  Force  "t 
Rochester,  under  Chief  of  Police  Capp.  In  the  year  r88q  Mr.  Hanson  came 
to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  boughl   fortv  acres  of  land  in  section 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  229 

II,  of  Homestead  township,  land  which  was  unbroken  railroad  territory. 
Hans  C.  Hanson  proceeded  to  clear  and  to  improve  this  land,  and  from 
time  to  time  increased  his  holdings  by  the  purchase  of  additional  land  until 
he  owned  two  hundred  and  forty  acres.  On  this  place  Hans  C.  Hanson  lived 
until  a  decade  ago,  at  the  time  of  leaving  he  having  one  of  the  best  improved 
and  most  completely  equipped  farms  of  the  community. 

During  his  residence  on  his  farm,  Hans  C.  Hanson,  for  two  years,  was 
driver  of  the  United  States  mail  on  the  star  route,  after  which  he  moved 
to  the  town  of  New  York  Mills  and  rented  an  old  hotel,  which  he  managed  in 
connection  with  his  duties  as  a  mail  carrier,  until  one  Easter  morning  when 
the  hotel  burned.  Mr.  Hanson  then  rented  a  nearby  house,  where  he  con- 
tinued in  the  hotel  business,  and  in  1906  he  erected  a  new  hotel  building 
which  was  known  as  "The  Merchant's  Hotel,''  a  building  which  was  equipped 
with  twenty  rooms,  all  of  which  were  supplied  with  hot  and  cold  running 
water  and  steam  heat.  Hans  C.  Hanson  conducted  this  hotel  until  the  vear 
[913,  when  he  retired  from  this  business  for  two  years  and  then,  during 
T915,  he  returned  to  the  management  of  his  former  place  of  business. 

At  the  time  of  the  double  tracking  of  the  Northern  Pacific  railway 
through  the  locality,  Hans  C.  Hanson  was  given  charge  of  a  special  company 
of  men  employed  at  construction  work  and  for  one  season  followed  this 
work  and  then  during  the  next  year  he  went  to  the  state  of  Montana,  where 
he  was  engaged  in  the  work  of  laying  the  steel  rails  between  the  towns  of 
Armington  and  of  Billings,  after  which  Mr.  Hanson  returned  to  New  York 
Mills,  being  called  home  on  account  of  illness  in  his  family.  At  this  time 
Hans  C.  Hanson  became  a  grain  buyer  for  the  Andrews  Grain  Company,  a 
position  in  which  he  is  now  engaged. 

Hans  C.  Hanson  has  taken  an  important  part  in  the  public  life  and  in 
the  public  affairs  of  New  York  Mills.  For  six  years  Mr.  Hanson  served  on 
the  town  council  and  during  that  time  it  was  largely  clue  to  his  personal 
efforts  that  the  streets  of  the  town  were  graded,  that  cement  sidewalks  were 
built,  and  that  the  central  park  of  the  town  was  arranged  for  and  largely 
completed — this  without  cost  to  the  community — the  funds  being  collected  l>\ 
public  subscription  and  by  donation.  Hans  C.  Hanson  was  the  organizer  of 
the  local  Commercial  Club,  an  organization  of  thirty-six-  members,  of  which 
Mr.  Hanson  is  now  serving  as  president.  During  the  year  1914  Hans  C 
Hanson  was  an  active  candidate  for  a  seat  in  the  state  Legislature,  but  was 
defeated  at  the  election. 

Hans  C.  Hanson  was  married  on  September  0.  t88i.  to  Charlotte  Carl- 
son, who  was  born  at  Stockholm,  Sweden,  the  daughter  of  Carl  Carlson  and 
wife,  who  were  natives  of  Sweden,  and  of  whom  the  father  came  to  \merica, 
his  daughter,  Charlotte,  coming  to  join  her  father  during  the  vear  1880. 


23O  OTTER  TAIL  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA. 

To  the  marriage  of  Hans  and  Charlotte  Hanson  were  born  the  follow- 
ing children:  Carl  Oscar,  who  is  a  railroad  man  of  Duluth,  Minnesota; 
Adla,  who  married  William  Ash  and  later  died  of  tuberculosis;  Alma,  who 
married  Seblon  Olson  and  lives  at  New  York  Mills;  Abby,  who  is  manager 
and  grain  buyer  for  the  Farmers'  Elevator  Company,  of  Vining,  Minnesota; 
Arthur,  who  is  a  chauffeur  for  the  Fiske  livery  at  New  York  Mills;  Justus,  a 
student  of  the  Wadena  Business  College;  Clara,  who  married  Marshall  Lloyd, 
an  electrician  of  Verndale,  Minnesota;  and  Laura,  who  lives  at  home.  Fol- 
lowing the  death  of  his  daughter,  Adla,  Hans  C.  Hanson  adopted  his  grand- 
daughter, Lura  Ash,  who  now  lives  with  Mr.  Hanson  as  one  of  the  family. 

Hans  C.  Hanson  is  prominently  and  broadly  affiliated  with  several  fra- 
ternal organizations  of  the  community,  he  being  a  member  of  the  Independ- 
ent Order  of  Odd  Fellows  since  twenty-two  years  of  age,  a  lodge  in  which 
he  has  served  as  vice-grand  at  Rochester.  Mr.  Hanson  is  also  a  Mason  of 
Perham  Lodge  No.  159,  as  well  as  of  the  chapter  at  Wadena.  Hans  C.  Han- 
son is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Brotherhood  of  America,  and  in  church 
affiliation  he  is  a  member  of  the  Congregational  church,  in  which  congrega- 
tion he  serves  as  treasurer.     In  politics  he  is  a  Republican. 


FELIX  NYLUND. 


Felix  Nylund,  a  native  of  Finland,  who  succeeded  his  father  in  the  pub- 
lication of  the  Uusi  Kotimaa  at  the  latter's  death,  in  1892,  is  a  well-known 
citizen  of  New  York  Mills  and  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota. 

Mr.  Nylund  was  born  on  January  4,  1873,  in  Finland,  and  is 'the  son  of 
August  and  Sophia  Nylund,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Finland,  the 
former  born  in  1835  and  the  latter  in  1845.  They  were  married  in  Finland 
and  in  1878  he  came  to  America  and  settled  at  Calumet.  Michigan.  Three 
years  later  the  family  came,  and  they  moved  to  Minneapolis.  Minnesota,  and 
in  July.  1884,  to  New  York  Mills,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota.  August 
Nylund  had  established  the  Uusi  Kotimaa  in  [882,  at  Minneapolis,  and  in 
1884  moved  tin-  business  to  New  York  Mills,  where  the  publication  of  the 
paper  has  since  been  continued.  August  Nylund  died  on  December  12.  [892, 
but  his  widow  is  still  living,  and  re-ides  at  New  York  Mills.  Felix  Nylund, 
the  subject  of  this  sketch,  in  partnership  with  his  brother,  August  Ferdinand, 
continued  the  publication  of  the  paper  alone,  under  the  firm  name  of  Nylund 
Brothers.  August  Ferdinand  Nylund  was  born  in  Finland  in  March,  1868. 
The  Uusi  Kotimaa  has  :t  circulation  of  approximately  six  thousand  live  hun- 
dred. It  is  a  financial  success  and  is  ably  conducted  by  its  presenl  owner 
and  proprietor. 

August  and  Sophia  Nylund  were  the  parents  of  nine  children,  of  whom 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  J^  I 

four,  Felix,  Lydia,  Hilma  Sophia  and  Olga,  are  now  living.  Felix  Nylund 
attended  public  school  in  Finland,  at  Calumet,  Michigan,  and  Minneapolis, 
Minnesota.  He  came  to  New  York  Mills,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
with  Ins  parents  and  took  up  the  publishing  business  in  1892.  He  has  been 
connected  with  the  business  ever  since.  For  three  years  Mr.  Nylund  has 
been  a  member  of  the  New  York  Mills  council.  He  has  been  a  member  of 
the  school  board  for  nine  years  and  was  clerk  of  the  board  for  rive  years. 
Mr.  Nylund  has  forty  acres  of  land  inside  the  village  of  New  York  Mills. 
He  owns  real  estate  and  the  building  in  which  his  business  is  housed.  Besides 
this  he  owns  residence  property  in  New  York  Mills.  He  is  an  enterprising 
business  man  and  well  deserves  the  success  which  has  attended  his  efforts 
since  his  father's  and  his  brother's  deaths.  Mr.  Nylund  is  a  thorough-going 
American,  thoroughly  in  sympathy  with  the  institutions  and  traditions,  and 
loyal  to  the  country  of  his  adoption. 


JENS  NELSON. 

Jens  Nelson,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Tordenskjold  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Sjalland,  Denmark,  where  his  birth  occurred 
on  January  2Q,  1870.  Mr.  Nelson  is  a  son  of  Nels  and  Sophia  (Nelson) 
Jensen. 

Nels  Jensen  and  wife  were  born,  reared  and  spent  all  their  lives  in  Den- 
mark. The  former  was  a  laborer  and  a  soldier  in  the  War  of  1863-64  against 
Germany.  He  is  still  living  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-two  years  and  is 
in  good  health.  His  wife  died  about  1907.  Nels  Jensen  and  wife  were  the 
parents  of  twelve  children,  ten  of  whom  were  daughters  and  two  sons.  Nine 
of  these  children  remained  in  Denmark.  One  daughter,  Helena,  came  to 
America,  and  after  arriving  in  this  country,  was  married  to  N.  P.  Gloier, 
and  they  are  residents  of  Brooklyn,  New  York. 

Jens  Nelson  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Denmark,  and  when 
he  was  twenty-one  years  of  age  came  to  America,  settling  in  Tordenskjold 
township,  where  lie  worked  for  the  farmers  of  the  neighborhood  for  about 
two  vears.  Afterward  Mr.  Nelson  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres 
of  land  in  section  10.  and  has  lived  here  ever  since.  The  farm  was  originally 
wild  land,  and  had  only  a  small  log  house  on  it  in  the  way  of  improvements. 
Only  about  twenty-two  acres  of  the  farm  had  been  cleared,  but  at  the  present 
time  there  is  a  tine  house  and  a  magnificent  bank  barn  with  a  concrete  foun- 
dation em  the  farm.  There  is  also  a  concrete  chicken  house,  and  all  of  the 
outbuildings  are  substantial  and  convenient  for  modern  farming.  The  house 
was  erected  in  1001  and  the  barn  in  tqoq.  There  is  a  beautiful  avenue  of 
oaks  leading  from  the  road  to  the  house,  and  Mr.   Nelson  has  also  set  out 


232  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

evergreens  and  box-elders,  adding  much  to  the  beauty  and  attractiveness  of 
tlie  place.  He  has  an  orchard  of  fifty  apple  trees,  and  is  engaged  in  mixed 
farming,  111  which  he  has  met  with  a  very  commendable  degree  of  success. 
On  August  9,  1892,  Jens  Nelson  was  married  to  Johanna  Christina 
Christensen,  a  bister  of  H.  C.  Christensen  and  C.  H.  Christensen,  mentioned 
elsewhere  in  this  volume.  Mr.  and  Airs.  Nelson  are  the  parents  of  five  chil- 
dren. Marie,  George,  Christine,  Lauritz  and  Herbert. 

Both  Air.  and  Airs.  Nelson  and  family  are  members  of  the  Free  Luth- 
eran church,  in  which  they  take  an  active  and  interested  part.  Mr.  Nelson 
is  independent  in  politics.  He  is  an  enterprising  farmer,  a  good  neighbor 
and  a  good  citizen,  and  enjoys  the  confidence  of  many  friends  and  acquaint- 
ances. 


LEANDER  HOLAIES. 


Of  those  men  who  from  foreign  counties  have  come  to  this  country,  and 
in  the  laud  of  their  adoption  have  proved  thorough  successes  regardless  of 
the  handicap  of  life  in  a  strange  nation,  the  name  of  Leander  Holmes,  a  native 
of  Finland,  is  one  which  stands  as  an  example  of  the  result  of  industry  and 
determination,  used  with  tact  and  with  foresight,  in  the  development  of  busi- 
ness and  industrial  life. 

Leander  Holmes  was  born  in  Finland  on  November  20,  [852,  the  son  of 
Charles  and  Elizabeth  Holmes,  who  likewise  were  born  in  Finland,  and  lived 
in  that  country  during  their  entire  life,  where  the  father  was  engaged  a-  a 
farmer.  Charles  and  Elizabeth  Holmes  were  the  parents  of  (he  following 
children:  Anna  Brita,  who  married  Leander  Mattson  and  lives  at  Duluth, 
Alinnesota;  Charles,  who  lives  in  Finland,  and  Leadner,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch. 

Leander  Holmes  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Finland,  and  was  con- 
firmed in  the  Lutheran  church  of  that  country,  after  which  he  learned  the 
carpenter's  trade  and  followed  that  business  as  a  skilled  and  expert  workman 
for  some  years,  both  in  his  immediate  locality  and  at  the  city  of  Petrograd 
1  Si  Petersburg),  Russia.  In  the  year  [882  he  came  to  America  and  was 
employed  as  a  workman  in  the  lumber  camps  of  the  state  of  Michigan  for 
some  years,  and  then  he  went  to  the  state  of  California,  where  he  followed 
the  same  business,  later  going  to  Park  City,  Utah,  and  engaging  as  a  worker 
111  the  silver  and  lead  mines  of  that  locality,  work  in  which  he  continued  for 
three  years.  In  the  year  c8Q2  Leander  Holmes  came  to  the  state  of  Minnesota 
and  located  in  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  bought  eighty  acres  of  land  in 
section  (»,  of  Newton  township.  Being  covered  with  brush  and  timber,  Lean- 
der   Holmes    proceeded    t>>   clear   his   land    and    to    replace   the   unsatisfactory 


OTTER    TAIL    imxi'V,    MINNESOTA.  233 

buildings  with  new  structures,  together  with  the  adding  of  land  to  his  hold- 
ings until  he  nov\  has  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  all  well 
improved  and  in  a  good  state  of  cultivation. 

During  the  year  1S77  Leander  Holmes  was  married  to  Gemina  Coopar, 
who  was  born  in  Finland,  the  daughter  of  Herman  Coopar  and  wife,  of  that 
country.  To  the  marriage  of  Leander  and  Gemina  Holmes  were  born  the  fol- 
lowing children:  Ina  .Maria,  who  married  Edward  Deschaine  and  lives  at 
.Menominee.  Michigan;  Gusta  Leander,  who  died  at  Petrograd,  when  an 
infant;  Axel  Ananias,  who  died  in  infancy;  John  Adolph,  an  employe  of  the 
Dower  Lumber  Company,  at  New  York  Mills,  Minnesota;  Lydia  Wilhel- 
mina,  who  married  Arthur  Haglund  and  lives  at  Hibbing,  Minnesota;  Hilma 
Sophia,  who  lives  at  home;  Fannie  Josephine,  who  died  during  the  year 
1910,  being  seventeen  years  of  age;  and  Frank  William  and  Winnie  Esther, 
who  live  at  home. 

Leander  Holmes  is  one  of  the  men  of  Otter  Tail  county  and  of  Newton 
township  who  has  done  much  for  the  progress  of  the  community,  being- 
willing  at  all  times  to  give  of  his  time  and  effort  for  the  promotion  of  public 
and  general  interests.  Unselfish  and  ambitious  for  the  welfare  of  the  locality 
he  ha-  proved  to  lie  a  worth}'  addition  to  the  citizenship  of  the  county. 


CHALKLEY  M.  BUTTON. 

Among  the  strong  and  influential  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county,  the 
review  of  whose  lives  is  an  important  part  of  this  book,  is  Chalkley  M.  But- 
ton, who  a>  a  man  of  keen  perception,  tireless  energy  and  honesty  of  purpose. 
together  with  the  use  of  intelligence,  has  exerted  a  beneficial  influence  in  the 
community  of  his  residence,  as  well  as  having  contributed  largely  to  the  sup- 
port of  the  moral  and  material  advancement  of  the  county. 

Chalkley  M.  Button  was  born  in  Hardin  county.  Iowa,  on  September 
30,  [860,  the  son  of  Hiram  and  Fannie  (Bolden)  Button,  the  father  being 
born  111  Chautauqua  count).  Ww  York,  on  February  u,  [833,  and  the 
mother  being  born  near  the  city  of  Indianapolis,  Indiana,  on  October  jo. 
[843.  Hiram  Button  was  the  son  of  Mbert  and  Mary  (Collins)  Button, 
his  mother  being  a  Quakeress  and  his  father  a  well-known  citizen  of  New 
England,  in  which  part  .if  the  country  they  were  married  and  afterward 
moved  to  Chautauqua  county,  New  York,  where  they  lived  for  some  time 
and  then  later  went,  about  the  year  1S55,  to  Hardin  county,  Iowa,  where 
he  followed  his  profession  and  his  trades  as  a  lawyer,  merchant  and  as  a 
shoemaker.  Hiram  Button,  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  one  of 
ten  children,  of  whom  two  are  living. 

Fannie  Boldon  was  the  daughter  of    \.sher  and  Emeline  I  Pitman)  Bol- 


2^4  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

don,  who  were  natives  of  the  state  of  Indiana,  where  they  lived  until  going 
to  the  state  of  Iowa,  where  Asher  Boldon  followed  his  vocation  as  a  farmer 
during  the  remainder  of  his  days.  Fannie  Button  was  one  of  ten  children, 
rive  ot  whom  the  now  living. 

Hiram  and  Fannie  Button  each  came  to  the  state  of  Iowa  with  then- 
parents  and  there  met  and  married,  and  then  Hiram  Button  engaged  as  a 
general  farmer  tor  some  years,  after  which  he  came  to  the  state  of  Minnesota 
and  located  in  Utter  Tail  county,  where  he  homesteaded  a  farm  of  eighty 
acres  of  land  in  section  jo,  of  Newton  township,  land  which  he  cleared  and 
where  he  established  a  home,  where  he  lived  until  his  death,  in  the  year  1902. 
Fannie  Button,  the  wife  of  Hiram  Button,  survives  her  husband,  she  being 
seventy-two  years  of  age.  Hiram  Button,  though  a  man  of  quiet  and  retiring- 
disposition,  was  faithful  to  his  duty  as  a  citizen  and  served  his  community 
in  the  offices  of  assessor,  school  director  and  supervisor,  as  well  as  being  one 
of  the  men  who  organized  the  Farmers'  Alliance,  a  strong  and  beneficial 
organization. 

Hiram  and  Fannie  Button  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Chalkey  M.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Florence,  who  died  in  infancy;  Byron 
A.,  who  lives  at  Williston,  North  Dakota;  Asher  ]..  who  conducts  a  business 
college  at  Moorhead,  Minnesota;  Jessie  M.,  who  married  Ole  Tranby  and 
lives  at  Malta,  Montana:  Oscar,  who  is  a  school  teacher  of  Bellingham, 
Washington:  Aivin,  who  is  a  school  teacher  of  Aldrich,  Minnesota;  I.usia. 
who  married  Clarence  Rowdon  and  lives  at  Malta,  Montana:  Mabel,  who 
married  David  Henry  and  lives  at  Malta.  Montana:  Myrtle  Edna,  who  died 
at  the  age  of  seven  years;  and  Fannie  Luella,  who  died  at  the  age  of  three 
years. 

Chalkley  M.  Button  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Hardin 
county,  Iowa,  and  in  the  schools  of  Otter  Tail  count)'-,  Minnesota,  after 
which  lie  taught  school  for  some  time  and  then  settled  in  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  where  he  homesteaded  eighty  acres  of  land,  across  the  road  from 
the  land  that  was  owned  by  his  father,  Hiram  Button.  Being  uncleared  land, 
Chalklej  M.  Button  sel  oul  to  prepare  In-  land  lor  cultivation,  clearing  the 
soil  of  brush  and  timber  and  building  a  house  and  other  buildings,  until  he 
ha-  ii"w  one  of  the  most  complete  farm-  of  the  community,  where  lie  engages 
in  general  farming  and  in  tin-  breeding  of  cattle  and  hogs. 

On  December  t_\  1000,  Chalkley  M.  Button  was  married  to  Frances 
Rummins,  who  was  born  in  tin-  state  of  Iowa,  the  daughter  of  George  Rum- 
mins  and  wife.  To  the  marriage  of  Chalkle}  and  Frances  Button  has  been 
born  two  children.  Florence  and  Chalkley  Monroe,  Jr. 

Chalklev  M.  Button  is  prominenl  in  the  business  life  of  his  community, 
being  a  shareholder  in  the  local  lel.-i.honc  company  and  being  a  man.  who 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  235 

because  of  his  experience  and  training,  is  one  whose  counsel  and  judgment 
in  matters  of  general  business  are  highly  valued. 

In  politics,  Mr.  Button  is  an  ardent  supporter  of  the  principles  of  the 
Prohibition  part}-  and  is  a  man  whose  efforts  in  the  direction  of  the  object 
of  this  party  has  proved  of  great  value. 


JOHN  GEISNESS. 


John  Geisness,  a  resident  of  this  county  for  twenty  years,  and  owner  of 
two  hundred  acres  of  splendid  farm  land,  while  not  a  native  of  the  county, 
is  looked  upon  as  such.  From  far  off  Norway  he  came  when  a  child  of  nine 
years,  bringing  with  him  the  strong  traits  of  character  for  which  his  coun- 
try is  noted.  Through  energy,  thrift  and  perseverance,  he  has  accomplished 
much  and  has  acquired  the  right  to  be  called  a  representative  farmer  and  a 
man  of  high  character. 

Mr.  Geisness  was  born  in  Trondhjem,  Norway,  on  January  31,  1857, 
son  of  Alexander  and  Annie  Boletta  (Lund)  Geisness,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Norway,  where  they  were  married.  Encouraged  by  reports  of  the 
new  country,  they  set  sail  for  America  in  1866  and  arriving  in  this  country 
made  their  first  home  in  St.  Croix  county,  Wisconsin,  where  they  bought  a 
farm  the  first  year.  Seven  years  after  he  purchased  a  farm  there,  Mr. 
Geisness  died,  but  his  wife  continued  to  live  there  until  her  death,  in  191 1, 
at  the  age  of  seventy-seven.  She  never  re-married.  Both  she  and  her  hus- 
band were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  and  the  latter  was  a  Republican 
in  politics.  Of  the  ten  children  born  in  their  home,  four  died  while  very 
young.  The  living  are :  John,  the  subject  of  this  biography ;  Bolletta  Mar- 
garet, who  married  Magnus  Olson  and  lives  two  miles  east  of  New  Rich- 
mond. Wisconsin;  Anne,  Mrs.  Arthur  Howell,  resides  in  Duluth,  Minne- 
sota; Ellen  is  the  wife  of  Edward  Halvorsen  and  lives  in  Duluth;  Thomas  is 
a  resident  of  Port  Angeles,  Washington,  and  \manda  is  Mrs.  Louis  Wahl, 
who  lives  on  the  old  home  place  in  Wisconsin. 

Because  of  the  large  family  and  the  difficulty  of  securing  an  adequate 
livelihood  in  the  early  days,  John  Geisness.  with  his  brothers  and  sisters. 
shared  the  lo1  common  to  the  children  of  pioneer  settlers.  The  school  days 
were  short  and  the  work  days  were  long  and  therefore  his  education  was 
only  such  as  could  be  acquired  at  that  time.  Spending  his  early  youth  on  tin- 
farm,  he  later  worked  in  the  pine  w Is   for  five  years  previous  to  several 

years  spenl  as  a  farm  laborer  in  Minnesota  and  Dakota.  Tn  [886  he  bought 
eighty  acres  in  section  31,  in  the  township  of  Henning,  built  a  log  house  and 
then-  he  lived  for  four  years,  during  which  time  he  broke  the  land  which 
was  at  the  date  of  purchase  only  a  wilderness,     lie  then  moved  to  Vining, 


236  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,,    MINNESOTA. 

where  he  purchased  a  hotel,  which  he  operated  for  eight  years.  Selling  the 
Henning  township  land  he  bought  a  farm  in  Nidaros  township,  which  was 
adjoining  to  his  village  hotel.  This  he  later  sold  to  a  man  named  Froslee, 
and  with  the  means  thus  obtained  bought  two  hundred  acres  in  Folden  town- 
ship, one  and  one-half  mile-  from  Vining.  There  he  lived  for  four  years. 
adding  to  his  propert)  by  a  tract  of  eighty  acre-  in  section  5.  and  later  a 
similar  amount  where  he  now  lives.  His  residence  on  this  place  has  been 
for  the  last  nme  years.  The  improvements  consist  of  a  line  new  home  and 
barn  and  such  other  necessities  as  the  modern  farm  demands.  Mr.  Geisness 
has  been  successful  as  a  breeder  of  Duroc-Jersey  hoys  and  has  made  a  spec- 
ialty of  dairy  farming,  keeping  on  hand  from  ten  to  fifteen  cows. 

Mr.  Geisness  was  still  a  young  and  ambitious  pioneer  when  he  mar- 
ried, bringing  his  bride,  Thnna  Haugenson,  to  his  crude  pioneer  cabin  home. 
This  was  on  May  0,  (888.  Mis.  Geisness  is  a  native  of  Norway,  having 
been  horn  there  mi  May  30,  18(14.  Her  parents,  Rolland  and  Christna 
(Ska fnes)  Eiaugenson,  were  among  the  first  pioneers  coming  to  Folden 
township,  for  they  arrived  in  their  wagons  in  1871.  The  father  died  on 
April  id.  [895,  his  widow  surviving  him  until  September  22,  1914,  when 
she  died,  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven.  The  children  born  to  them  are:  Edna 
Amanda,  who  married  Eric  Paulson  and  lives  in  Sacred  Heart,  Minnesota: 
Reynard  Alexander,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eighteen;  Annie  Bolletta,  who 
died  at  two  years  of  age,  and  was  followed  by  another  daughter,  also  named 
Annie  Bolletta,  who  grew  up  and  married  Clifford  Read,  a  resident  of 
Seattle.  Washington;  Cora  Nicoline,  Ella  Juliet.  Thea  Jennette  and  Eva 
Elenora,  all  In  ing  at  home. 

The  Haugenson  family  were  indeed  pioneers,  the  log  house  in  which 
the)  first  lived  is  still  standing  and  is  now  used  as  a  summer  kitchen.  When 
ime  <ui  the  northern  frontier  they  were  often 
their  sudden  appearance  used  to  frighten  even 
in  the  year  1868  when  this  family  crossed  the 
1  hard  journey  overland  arrived  in  St.  Croix 
y  lived  for  the  following  three  years.  When 
1N71.  traveling  in  covered  wagons  drawn  by 
s  to  make  the  journey.  In  order  to  procure 
walk  to  town. 

ire   members   of    the    Lutheran    United   church. 

He  has  been    for  two  terms  president   of  the 

k-  Company  and  has  been  also  president  of  the 

residence    here    Mr.    and    Mrs.    Geisness    have 

ittractive   home   many    friends   ami   acquaintances.      Mrs 

a  valuable  assistant  in  all  that   her  ambitious  husband  has 


they   f 

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isconsin,   when 

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d  t 

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Since    their    1 

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OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  237 

undertaken  to  do  and  both  are  among  the  most  highly  respected  citizens  of 
this  locality,  Mr.  Geisness  being  recognized  as  one  of  its  leading  farmers 
and  business  men. 


HENRY  CORDES. 


The  energy,  frugality  and  business  instinct  of  the  German  citizen  has 
done  much  toward  the  development  of  the  United  States.  Wherever  these 
people  have  settled  there  is  evidence  of  thrift  and  prosperity.  Substantial 
homes,  large  barns  and  well-cultivated  fields  in  the  rural  districts  and  well- 
conducted  business  interests  in  the  towns  and  cities.  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  is  no  exception  to  the  rule,  for  here  is  found  the  progressive 
farmer  and  the  successful  business  man  of  German  origin. 

Henry  Cordes,  a  German  by  birth,  is  a  man  true  to  the  instincts  of  his 
race,  born  in  Hanover,  Germany,  February  12,  1872,  he  came  to  this  country 
in  early  boyhood  and  has  been  most  successful  in  his  calling. 

Henry  Cordes  was  the  son  of  Herman  and  Charlotte  (Winter)  Cordes, 
natives  of  Hanover,  Germany.  Herman  Cordes  was  born  on  April  14,  1842, 
and  was  married  to  Charlotte  Winter  in  1870,  whose  birth  occurred  on  May 
20,  1844.  He  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  his  country. 
He  and  his  wife  were  active  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  church.  Mr. 
Cordes  operated  a  small  farm  in  German}-,  where  he  and  his  wife  reared  a 
family  of  ten  children.  In  the  year  1885  he  decided  to  cast  his  fortunes  in 
America  and,  in  company  with  his  wife  and  children,  he  landed  in  New  York 
City  mi  April  5,  of  that  year.  He  came  directly  to  Minnesota,  where  he 
entered  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  21,  Leaf  Lake  town- 
ship, Otter  Tail  county.  Mr.  Cordes  is  still  living  on  a  farm  near  Henning, 
Mrs.  Gunk's  having  died  on  July   18,   1909. 

The  parents  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Herman  Cordes  never  came  to  America. 
Henry  Cordes.  the  lather  of  Herman,  was  an  extensive  farmer  and  owned 
large  tracts  of  land  in  Germany.  Fritz  Winter,  the  father  of  Mrs.  Herman 
Cordes,  was  also  a  tiller  of  the  soil  and  owned  a  small  farm.  The  Cordes 
and  Winter  families  wen-  all  members  of  the  German   Lutheran   church. 

Henry  Conks,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  received  most  of  his  educa- 
tion in  Germany,  having  come  to  the  United  Slates  when  a  lad  of  thirteen, 
he  received  but  one  year  of  schooling  in  America.  Mr.  Cordes  was  mar- 
ried on  October  18,  1900,  to  Doris  Bormann,  a  native  of  Hanover,  Ger- 
many. She  was  bom  on  January  28,  [878.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cordes  are  the 
parents  of  eight  children:  Herman,  Hertha,  Emma,  Bettie,  Clara,  Walter, 
Edwin  and  Norbert. 

Tn  tooo  Henn   Cordes  purchased  of  his  father  one  hundred  and  sixty 


238  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.     MINNESOTA. 

acres  of  his  proem  farm.  Two  years  before  he  purchased  an  adjoining 
one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  completing  his  present  farm  of  two  hundred 
and  eighty  acres.  Mr.  Cordes  has  added  much  to  the  value  of  his  farm  by 
the  erection  of  a  large  barn,  forty  by  eighty-four  feet,  with  two  silos,  twelve 
by  thirty-four  feet,  the  work  being  completed  in  the  year  1909.  Two  years 
previous  to  this  he  had  rebuilt  a  large  and  modern  house.  Later  he  has 
added  a  number  of  large  sheds  for  bis  machinery  and  for  the  comfort  of  his 
many  hogs  and  line  Guernsey  cattle.  Air.  Cordes  owns  his  threshing  outht, 
but  does  only  the  threshing  on  his  own  farm  and  near  neighbors. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cordes  are  active  members  of  the  German  Lutheran 
church,  in  which  denomination  Mr.  Cordes  has  been  a  member  of  the  official 
board  fur  six  years.  He  is  at  the  present  time  treasurer  of  the  school  board, 
director  of  the  creamery  company  and  he  holds  the  office  of  vice-president 
witli  the  telephone  companies  of  Otter  Tail  and  Henning.  Mr.  Cordes  has 
been  very  active  in  all  things  that  tend  to  the  development  and  improvement 
of  his  home  and  the  community  in  which  he  lives. 


MARTIN  K.  MARTINSON. 

Martin  K.  Martinson,  successful  and  well-known  farmer  of  Compton 
township,  in  Otter  Tail  county,  a  man  who  has  taken  no  small  part  in  the 
development  and  advancement  of  the  community  and  the  support  of  its 
movements  and  projects  for  a  greater  township  and  county,  was  born  in 
Sweden  on  August  4.  1864,  the  son  of  Martin  Erickson  and  Emma  (  Peter- 
son) Erickson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden  where  they  now  live. 
Martin  Erickson  being  a  farmer  of  that  country.  Martin  Erickson  and  his 
wife  are  the  parents  of  four  children,  Margaret,  Peter,  Martin,  and  Chris- 
tine who  is  deceased. 

Martin  K.  Martinson  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  his  native 
land  after  which  he  came  to  America,  in  the  year  1889,  and  went  to  the 
state  of  Minnesota,  where  he  located  in  Otter  Tail  county,  working  for  some 
year--  as  a  farm  helper.  In  the  year  1885  he  bought  eighty  acres  of  farm 
land  in  Compton  township,  section  28,  paying  for  this  land  the  sum  of  two 
thousand  five  hundred  dollars.  On  this  place  Martin  K.  Martinson  lias 
since  lived,  he  having  improved  the  farm  and  cultivated  the  soil  until  the 
place  is  among  the  most  desirable  of  the  locality. 

On  December  4.  ton-.  Martin  K.  Martinson  was  married  to  Carrie 
Peterson,  wh<>  was  horn  in  Sweden,  the  daughter  of  Nels  Peterson  and  wife, 
who  came  to  America  in  the  year  1893,  locating  in  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  where  they  bought  a  farm,  which  later  they  sold  to  Martin  K. 
Martinson. 

Martin    K .   and   Carrie    Martinson  are  the  parents   of   one  child,    Algot. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  239 

who  was  born  on  October  14,  1903.  Mr.  Martinson  and  his  wife  are  well 
known  and  highly  respected  members  of  the  Swedisli  Lutheran  church,  a 
congregation  in  which  they  are  actively  engaged  as  workers  and  as  support- 
ers of  the  creeds  of  this  denomination. 

In  public  life  Martin  K.  Martinson  has  taken  no  especial  part,  he  pre- 
ferring to  live  well  and  to  do  his  duty  as  a  private  citizen  of  the  county  and 
the  township. 


OLAUS  O.  HOYL.WT). 


The  history  of  one  who  has  lived  an  honorable  life  and  attained  high 
distinction  in  the  community  in  which  he  lives  should  find  a  prominent  place 
in  the  biographical  records  used  by  succeeding  generations.  The  lives  of 
these  men  serve  as  an  inspiration  to  beginners  and  as  a  spur  to  novices  in 
the  field  of  industry.  Among  those  who  have  resided  in  Otter  Tail  county 
since  the  very  beginning  of  her  agricultural  development,  is  Olaus  O.  Hov- 
land.  As  a  boy  he  had  the  privilege  of  living  on  a  Minnesota  homestead 
and  to  those  days  of  stern  labor  and  discipline  be  owes  much  of  the  success 
which  came  to  him  in  later  life. 

Olaus  Hovland  was  burn  in  Winneshiek  county.  Iowa,  on  the  16th  of 
September,  1868,  and  is  the  son  of  Ole  O.  and  Anna  (Teslo)  Hovland. 
Contrary  to  the  prevailing  custom  of  that  locality  and  period  he  received 
more  than  the  average  educational  training.  He  attended  the  local  public 
schools  and  at  the  completion  of  the  common  school  course  entered  the  high 
school  at  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  During  his  attendance  in  the  high 
school,  he  absorbed  the  highest  principles  of  right  living  and  learned  to 
look  upon  the  occupation  of  farming  as  a  dignified  and  noble  form  of  labor. 
His  first  experience  as  a  farmer  was  received  on  his  father's  homestead 
where  he  went  to  work  after  leaving  high  school.  For  several  years  follow- 
ing his  period  of  residence  on  his  father's  farm,  he  rented  a  place  whose 
resources  proved  to  be  unusually  profitable.  In  iqi_>,  he  bought  the  place 
where  he  now  reside^.  The  farm  extends  over  two  hundred  acres  of  ground 
located  in  sections  26  and  27.  He  has  erected,  since  his  occupation  of  the 
place,  buildings  of  modern  construction  and  design.  His  interests  are  with 
general  farming  and  he  gives  some  attention  to  stock  raising.  As  a  Repub- 
lican he  has  served  as  township  clerk  and  as  school  director  and  executed 
the  duties  of  each  office  with  efficiency  and  force. 

On  the  21st  of  March.  1895,  the  marriage  of  Olaus  Hovland  to  Minnie 
Sjolaas.  a  native  of  Oscar  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  took  place  She 
is  the  daughter  of  John  and  Karin  (Bjerke)  Sjolaas,  among  the  early  set- 
tlers of  that  section,  who  settled  there  in  186V).  having  come  from  Houston 
county,   Minnesota,   where   they   had   lived   since  the   early   development    <>f 


-'4°  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

that  community.  .Mr.  Sjolaas  died  on  the  27th  of  March,  1902,  and  his 
wife  passed  away  on  the  7th  of  January.  10,14.  No  children  have  been  born 
to  Mr.  and  Airs.  Hovland,  but  they  have  found  enjoyment  and  pleasure  in 
the  task  of  rearing-  the  three  nieces  of  Mrs.  Hovland;  Ida,  Luella  and  Lena 
Lider. 

J'lie  work  of  Olaus  Hovland  has  been  such  as  to  win  for  him  more 
than  passing  recognition  in  the  count)-  in  which  he  lives.  While  he  has 
worked  mainly  [or  individual  advancement,  he  has  never  lost  sight  of  the 
fact  that  there  are  movements  for  public  good  and  has  used  his  best  efforts 
in  furthering  the  cause  of  honesty  and  business  prosperity  in  Otter  Tail 
county.  lie  is  a  man  of  a  versatile  nature  which  has  found  expression  in 
deeds  for  the  welfare  of  the  public  at  large. 


MM  IX  B.  THOMPSON. 


A  man  of  splendid  attainments  as  a  lawyer.  John  B.  Thompson  has 
long  held  local  precedence  as  an  exponent  of  the  most  loyal  and  progressive 
spirit.  An  influential  factor  in  the  promotion  of  various  important  business 
enterprises,  he  is  eminent!}-  entitled  to  mure  than  passing  consideration  in 
the  biographical  records  of  the  county  in  which  he  resides.  A  native  son 
of  <  )tter  Tail  county  and  a  representative  of  one  of  its  well-known  and 
honored  Norwegian  families.  Mr.  Thompson  has  well  upheld  the  prestige 
of  the  name  which  he  bears  and  which  has  been  long  and  prominently  iden- 
tified with  the  industrial  affairs  of  Battle  Make,  this  comity.  His  character 
and  services  have  but  further  exemplified  that  line  type  of  citizenship  which 
has  made  the  Norwegian  element  one  of  so  much  importance  and  influence  in 
the  sturdy  citizenship  of  Minnesota. 

John  B.  Thompson  was  horn  on  November  4.  1876.  in  Mane  Prairie 
township,  this  county,  son  of  l'.ernt  and  Inger  (Gulseth)  Thompson.  His 
parents  were  horn  in  Selber,  Trondhjem,  Norway,  where  they  were  also 
married.  Upon  their  arrival  in  America  with  a  large  family  early  in  the 
seventies,  Mr.  and  Mr>.  Thompson  settled  in  Spring  Grove,  Minnesota. 
They  later  came  to  Otter  fail  count)  ami  took  a  homestead  claim  on  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  on  the  wesl  side  of  Indian  lake  in  Dane  Prairie 
township.  In  that  section  Mr.  Thompson  met  the  trials  of  pioneer  lite  in 
.1  strange  community,  but  his  character  was  of  such  force  and  strength  that 
he  was  able  to  turn  his  means  of  maintenance  in  life  from  a  hardship  to  a 
pastime.  lie  cleared  a  place  for  a  log  cabin  before  he  entered  upon  any 
form  of  agricultural  life,  and  lived  several  years  in  the  dwelling,  most  of 
which  had  been  erected  by  himself.  Later  in  life  he  sold  his  place  to  his 
son.  Nels  B.  Thompson,  and  moved  to  the  opposite  side  of  the  lake.  wher< 
he  died   after  a    few    years.      Mr-.    Thompson    spent   her  last    days   with   her 


THOMPSON. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  24I 

daughter,  Mrs.  Thomas  Larson,  the  wife  of  one  of  the  prominent  men  of 
this  count}',  a  biographical  sketch  of  whom  is  presented  elsewhere  in  this 
volume.  Mr.  Thompson  was  a  Republican  and  took  an  active  interest  in 
the  political  affairs  of  the  county,  but  could  never  be  persuaded  to  accept  a 
candidacy  for  a  political  office.  He  was  deeply  devout  in  all  his  religious 
undertakings  ami  with  his  wife  gave  loyal  support  to  the  Lutheran  church 
of  which  they  were  members.  Mr.  Thompson  was  not  only  one  of  the 
founders  of  the  church  in  the  community  in  which  he  lived,  but  for  a  time 
before  its  establishment  on  a  permanent  basis,  gave  the  use  of  his  house  as 
a  meeting  place  for  the  congregation. 

John  B.  Thompson  received  the  advantages  of  a  liberal  education,  avail- 
ing himself  first  of  the  opportunities  offered  in  the  course  of  study  at  the 
Wilmer  Seminary.  After  he  left  Luther  College  in  the  year  1896.  he 
attended  the  University  of  Minnesota,  from  which  institution  he  was  gradu- 
ated in  the  year  1904.  Following  the  plan  he  had  mapped  out  for  his 
future  profession,  his  course  in  the  university  was  that  of  the  law  and 
shortly  after  his  graduation  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  began  his  prac- 
tice in  Henning,  a  village  in  Otter  Tail  county.  During  the  legislative 
session  of  1905,  he  was  engrossing  clerk,  and  at  the  expiration  of  that  term 
of  service  he  returned  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  has  resided  ever  since. 
Mr.  Thompson  has  made  rapid  and  substantial  progress  in  his  practice  of 
law  and  through  his  ability  and  well-fortified  powers  as  a  counselor,  has 
gained  a  position  entitling  him  to  the  full  confidence  and  respect  of  the  com- 
munity. Aside  from  his  law  practice,  he  has  at  different  times  been  engaged 
in  business  enterprises  which  have  proved  most  successful.  In  1912,  in  com- 
pany with  T.  A.  Ranstad,  Mr.  Thompson  made  his  initial  appearance  in  the 
field  of  business  enterprise,  as  agent  for  a  popular  line  of  automobiles.  This 
line  of  work  has  not  only  proved  to  be  profitable,  but  it  has  also  been  of  an 
unusually  pleasant  nature,  and  has  gained  for  the  subject  of  this  sketch  a 
wide  acquaintance  throughout  the  entire  county  of  Otter  Tail.  Further 
prestige  was  later  gained  by  him  as  director  and  manager  of  the  Battle  Lake 
Milling  Company  which  he  organized.  He  has  also  found  time  ami  oppor- 
tunity for  work  in  the  field  of  real  estate  in  which  he  takes  a  live  interest. 

Mr.  Thompson  has  given  bis  entire  political  supporl  to  tin-  cause  of  the 
Republican  party,  and  has  been  honored  for  the  last  four  years  with  the 
position  of  mayor  of  Battle  Lake.  With  the  numerous  cares  of  professional 
and  business  interests  on  his  mind  Mr.  Thompson  still  finds  time  to  engage 
in  the  recreations  of  fraternal  and  social  life.      He  is  a  member  of  the   Elks 

lodge  at  Fergus  Falls,  and  also  of  the  Modern  W Imen  of    America.     He 

fills  the  office  of  secretary  of  the  Commercial  Club  at  Battle  Lake,  an  office 
I  t6b) 


2-|-  OTTER     PALL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

the  duties  of  which  have  brought  him  in  contact  with  the  best  class  of 
citizenship  of  the  community  in  which  he  lives  and  won  for  him  much  popu- 
larity among  its  members. 

On  June  23,  iqoj,  John  B.  Thompson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Pauline 
Tjostelson,  who  was  born  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  the  daughter  of  Peter 
Tjostelson,  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  that  locality.  Air.  and  Mrs. 
Thompson  have  no  children. 


HENRY  GEORGE  HOFF. 

From  the  land  of  Norway  have  come  to  America  many  of  the  desirable 
and  enterprising  citizens  of  foreign  countries  who  take  an  important  and 
conspicuous  part  in  the  life  of  this  country;  men  who  are  hardy,  persevering, 
industrious  and  resourceful,  a  type  of  manhood  without  which  America  and 
American  life  would  be  denied  one  of  its  most  acceptable  elements.  Of  this 
type  of  manhood  and  citizenship  is  Henry  George  Hoff,  and  the  excellent 
family  of  which  he  is  a  representative. 

Henry  George  Hoff  was  born  on  the  farm  where  he  now  lives,  in 
Tordenskjold  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  on  July  10,  1883, 
the  son  of  John  T.  and  Marie  dishing)  Hoff.  both  of  whom  were  born  in 
Norway,  the  father  at  Hedemarken,  on  August  12,  1840,  and  the  mother  at 
Vadsoe,  of  northern  Norway,  on  April  iS.  1856.  John  'I'.  Holt  was  the 
son  of  Tollef  and  Gunor  ('Johnson)  Hoff,  who  were  horn  in  Norway,  where 
they  were  married  and  to  whom  were  born  four  sons,  one.  .Andrew,  came  to 
America  in  the  year  1868.  and  located  in  Houston  county,  Minnesota.  Later 
Tollef  and  Gunor  Hoff,  with  their  three  sons,  came  and  located  with  the  son 
and  brother,  Andrew,  in  Houston  county,  where  they  lived  for  one  year 
and  then  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  Tollef  Hoff  and 
two  sons  took  up  a  homestead  in  Tordenskjold  township.  Later  Tollef 
Hoff  sold  his  homestead  and  moved  to  Ashby  where  he  died  in  January. 
1897.  Gunor  Hoff  preceded  her  husband  in  death  thirteen  years,  dying  in 
the  year   T8S4. 

Marie  Ilshing  was  the  daughter  of  Ole  and  Guri  fishing,  who  were 
born  in  Norway  ami  came  to  America  in  the  year  1865  and  settled  at  Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota,  where  Ole  fishing  followed  his  trade  as  a  mason,  until 
the  year  [868,  when  he.  with  his  family,  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  and 
took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  in  section  32,  where 
Henry  George  Hoff,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  now  lives.  After  some  years, 
during  which  time  Ole  Ilshing  cleared  his  land  and  improved  it.  he  sold  his 
farm  to  John  T.  Hoff.  following  which  he  moved  to  St.  Olaf  township, 
and  purchased  a  farm  which  later  lie  sold  ami  then  hought  another  farm, 
which  after  a  time  he  sold.      Then  Ole  Ilshing  became  a  merchant  at  Dalton. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    -MINNESOTA.  243 

.Minnesota,  a  business  in  which  he  continued  until  four  or  five  years  later, 
when  he  died,  his  wife,  Guri,  having  preceded  him  in  death,  in  the  year 
1886.  Ole  and  Guri  Ilshing  were  the  parents  of  three  children:  Marie, 
mother  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Hans,  who  died  as  a  boy,  in  Norway; 
llaiisiiKi,  who  married  Halbert  Parker  and  lives  at  Junction  City,  Oregon. 

John  T.  and  Mary  Hoff  were  married  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
after  which  they  established  a  home  on  the  claim  of  John  T.  in  section  7, 
of  Tordenskjold  township,  a  place  where  they  lived  for  four  years  and  then 
bought  out  the  place  of  Ole  Ilshing,  a  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  in  section 
32.  John  T.  and  Mary  Hoff  lived  on  this  farm  until  1907  when  Mr.  Hoff 
sold  his  place  to  his  son,  Henry  George,  and  retired.  John  T.  Hoff  was  one 
of  the  founders  of  the  Lutheran  Free  church  of  Minnesota.  Mary  Hoff 
lived  as  the  faithful  wife  of  John  T.  Hoff  until  her  death  in  the  year  1900. 
To  the  marriage  of  John  T.  and  Mary  Hoff  were  born  six  children :  Oscar 
Theodore,  who  lives  on  a  farm  in  Tordenskjold  township.  Minnesota;  Gena 
Gurina,  who  married  Edward  K.  Johnson  and  lives  in  Tordeskjold  town- 
ship; Alma  Helena;  Henry  George,  the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Manda 
Georgia,  a  stenographer,  who  lives  in  the  state  of  [daho,  and  Borghild  Julia. 

Henry  George  Hoff  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  district  No.  20,  of 
Tordenskjold  township,  and  then  he  worked  on  his  fathers  farm  for  a  time 
after  which  he  attended  the  agricultural  college  of  the  state  of  Minnesota. 
during  the  year  190 1 -2,  and  then  returned  to  the  farm  and  aided  his  father 
until  1907,  when  he  bought  his  father's  place  and  engaged  himself  in  the 
pursuit  of  general  farming  and  stock  raising. 

On  June  23,  1909,  George  Henry  Hoff  was  married  to  Mary  Weiby, 
who  was  born  in  Dalton.  the  daughter  of  Clement  Weiby  and  wife.  To 
this  marriage  two  children  have  been  born  :  Jean,  who  was  born  on  March 
13,  10.10,  and  Allen,  who  was  born  on  May  18,  1913. 


NATHAN  T.  FINN. 


Born  in  Chase  county,  Kansas,  December  4,  1870,  Nathan  ].  Finn,  of 
Oak  Valley  township,  is  a  prosperous  farmer.  Mr.  Finn  is  the  son  oJ 
Jasper  and  Yilctte  (Packard)  linn,  the  latter  of  whom  was  a  native  of 
Illinois.  They  were  married  in  [owa  and  later  settled  in  Kansas  in  an  early 
day.  .Mr.  Finn's  father  died  in  Kansas,  November  11,  [901.  His  widow, 
however,  is  still  living.  Mr.  Finn  knows  very  little  about  his  parents,  how 
ever,  as  he  was  reared  by  his  maternal  grandparents,  Nathan  FT.  and  I. no 
Packard.  They  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  in  June.  [875,  and  settled  on 
section  2.  of  Oak  Valley  township.  Mr.  Finn's  maternal  grandfather  died 
in   iNoi   and  his  grandmother  in    1893. 

Mr.   Finn  came  to  Otter  Tail  county   with  hi-  grandparents  in    187:; 


-44  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

and  has  since  resided  in  this  county.  He  remained  with  his  grandparents 
until  their  deaths  and,  after  this,  the  farm  was  sold.  He  purchased  one 
hundred  and  twenty  acres  in  sections  2$  and  25,  of  Oak  Valley  township. 
In  1912  Mr.  Finn  built  a  large  barn,  thirty-two  by  forty-four  feet.  He 
also  has  improved  the  farm  in  various  other  ways. 

In  1893,  after  the  death  of  his  grandmother,  Nathan  J.  Finn  was  mar- 
ried to  Hattie  Smith,  who  was  born  in  1873,  in  Chicago,  and  who  is  the 
daughter  of  Charles  and  Sarah  (Naylor)  Smith.  They  came  to  Oak  Valley 
township  in  1876  and  took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in 
section  26.  Mrs.  Finn's  father  died  in  October,  1913.  Her  mother  is  now 
living  in  Hewitt.  Minnesota.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Finn  have  two  children.  Lee. 
born  on  July  2.  1910,  and  Leona,  born  on  March  22,  1913.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Finn  also  have  tun  adopted  children.  Naomia,  who  is  seventeen  years  old, 
and  Ralph,  who  is  fourteen. 

Mr.  Finn  is  a  member  of  the  township  board  at  the  present  time  and 
is  treasurer  of  the  school  board,  a  position  which  he  has  filled  creditably  for 
several  years.  He  is  well  known  and  well  liked  in  the  community  where 
he  lives  and  where  the  people  have  had  an  opportunity  to  know  his  char- 
acter and  his  worth  as  a  man. 


ANDREW  ISAKSON. 


Andrew  Isakson,  an  enterprising  farmer  of  Inman  township.  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  was  horn  in  Sweden  on  December  16,  1872,  the  son  of 
Isaac  and  Betsey  Johnson. 

Mr.  Isakson's  parents  were  both  natives  of  Sweden.  They  immigrated 
to  America  and  settled  at  Henning,  Otter  Tail  county,  in  1892.  Mr.  Isak- 
son's father  died  in  Henning  in  1896  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years  and  his 
mother  in  iqn  at  the  age  of  seventy-eight.  They  were  the  parents  of  six 
children,  John.  Christine  (who  lives  in  Sweden),  Berg,  Nels  (deceased), 
Andrew  and  Olaf. 

Andrew  Isakson  was  educated  in  Sweden  and.  in  1892.  came  to  America 
and  settled  at  Henning,  purchasing  forty  acres  in  section  17,  of  Henning 
township.  Later  Mr.  Isakson  sold  this  farm  and  in  1900  purchased  eighty 
acres  in  section  12,  of  Inman  township.  He  has  cleared  his  farm  and  erected 
good  buildings  on  it.  Mr.  Isakson  is  not  only  a  good  farmer  and  stock  man, 
but  he  is  a  carpenter  by  trade  and  has  worked  at  this  trade  almost  con- 
tinuously during  the  past  two  years.  Nevertheless,  Mr.  Isakson  has  kept  a 
very  close  oversight  on  his  farm  and  has  supervised  the  work  on  the  farm. 

In  iQOf)  Andrew  Isakson  was  married  to  Sadie  Person,  who  was  born 
in  1889  in  Sweden  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Olaf  and  Ellen  Person,  of 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  245 

Leaf  Lake  township.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isakson  have  two  sons,  Edwin,  born 
on  August  29,  1909,  and  Melvin,  born  on  July  22,  1913. 

Mr.  Isakson  is  now  serving  his  second  term  as  supervisor  of  Inman 
township.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isakson  are  members  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran 
church.  They  are  not  only  prominent  in  religious  affairs  but  likewise 
prominent  in  civic  affairs  of  this  township.  They  have  a  host  of  friends 
in  the  neighborhood  where  thev  live. 


JOHN  S.  TORGERSEN. 

Among  the  pioneer  citizens  of  Tordenskjold  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  and  among  its  successful  farmers  and  business  men,  is 
John  S.  Torgersen,  who  was  born  near  Talvake,  in  Sopnes,  Norway,  Septem- 
ber 12,  1849.  Mr.  Torgersen  is  the  son  of  Michael  and  Kari  (Thompson) 
Torgersen. 

Michael  Torgersen  was  born  at  Raroaas,  Norway,  and  his  wife  in  Tap- 
luft,  near  Talvake,  Norway,  the  former  in  1815  and  the  latter  about  1825. 
They  were  married  in  Norway  and  lived  near  Sopnes,  where,  for  twenty- 
five  years.  Michael  Torgersen  taught  school.  After  the  death  of  his  wife, 
in  April,  1866,  Michael  Torgersen  came  to  America  with  his  family.  The 
voyage  to  America  was  made  on  a  steamship  and  on  their  arrival  in  America, 
the  family  spent  on  winter  in  Winneshiek  county.  Iowa.  After  moving  to  St. 
Paul,  Minnesota,  Michael  Torgersen  left  three  daughters  in  that  city,  and, 
with  three  sons  and  two  daughters,  came  to  Otter  Tail  county.  The  journey 
from  St.  Paul  to  St.  Cloud  was  made  by  rail  and  from  St.  Cloud  to  Otter 
Tail  county  by  wagon.  Upon  arriving  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Mr.  Torgersen 
homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Tordenskjold  town- 
ship on  the  west  shores  of  Stalker  lake.  A  cabin  built  on  the  shore  of  the 
lake  was  destroyed  bv  fire  in  1868.  For  some  time  Mr.  Torgersen  had  no 
horses  and  only  two  cows.  Subsequently,  he  built  another  log  house  on  a 
hill  just  north  of  the  first  and  there  lived  until  late  in  life,  when  he  built  a 
little  house  near  the  home  of  his  son,  Jens.  He  died  there  in  i8qX.  After 
coming  to  Otter  Tail  county,  he  had  married  Ellen  Haldorson.  He  also 
taught  school  here  for  some  years  and,  for  some  time,  sang  in  the  choir  of 
his  church.  He  was  a  prominent  member  of  the  Synod  Lutheran  church. 
Of  his  twelve  children,  four  died  early  in  life  in  Norway,  Salvine  married 
Robert  Karsman.  and,  having  returned  to  Sweden,  now  lives  in  Stockholm; 
Magdalena  married  Thomas  Dwyer  and  died  in  Minneapolis;  John  S.  is  the 
subject  of  this  sketch;  Lena  married  Andrew  Burg  and  lives  in  Grand 
Island,  Nebraska;  Dora  is  the  widow  of  Knut  Foss  and  lives  in  Butte.  Mon- 
tana;   fins  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume;  Bert  lives  at  Tentpole, 


246  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY;    MINNESOTA. 

North  Dakota,  where  he  is  a  farmer;  Bolletta  married  Sam  Huseby  and 
lives  in  Fergus  Falls. 

John  S.  Torgersen  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway  and 
spent  about  one  month  in  the  schools  of  America,  after  which  he  engaged 
in  farming.  In  1871  Mr.  Torgersen  homestead ed  one  hundred  and  forty- 
nine  acres  in  Tordenskjold  township,  adjoining  his  father's  farm.  Here 
he  erected  a  shanty  and  began  clearing  the  land.  After  a  time,  he  bought 
forty  acres  from  the  railroad  just  north  of  his  first  farm.  He  now  has  a 
good  modern  house,  barn  and  other  outbuildings,  all  of  which  are  kept  in 
a  splendid  state  of  repair.  Mr.  Torgersen  is  a  general  farmer  and  stock- 
man and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  local  telephone  company  and  in  the  Dalton 
elevator. 

In  1874  John  S.  Torgersen  was  married  to  Johanna  Nelson,  a  native 
of  Norway  and  the  daughter  of  Nels  Langrjovold,  who  died  in  his  native 
land.  Nine  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  S.  Torgersen. 
Kari.  who  married  Olaf  Tue  and  lives  in  Carlton  county,  Minnesota;  Annie, 
who  married  Spencer  Folkedal  and  lives  in  Dalton;  Martin,  who  lives  in 
Moose  Jaw,  Canada;  Emma,  who  died  in  infancy;  Nels.  John  and  Christine. 
who  live  at  home;  Emma,  who  married  Andrew  Utne  and  lives  in  Dane 
Prairie  township,  and  Olga,  who  married  Richard  Sjordal  and  lives  in 
Montana. 

Mr.  Torgersen  is  a  Republican  in  politics  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are 
members  of  the  Free  Lutheran  church. 


JOHN  DOLL. 


John  Doll,  farmer  and  widely  known  citizen  of  Rush  Lake  township. 
<  Hter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Mercer  county.  Ohio,  on  May  -'<>, 
[839,  the  son  of  Anton  and  Mary  Ann  (  [barter  1  Doll,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Baden,  Germany,  the  former  born  in  iSto.  the  latter  in  1S10 
\11ton  Doll  was  the  son  of  Joseph  Doll  and  wife.  Joseph  Doll,  after  the 
death  of  his  wife,  in  German),  coming  to  America  in  1830,  and  settling  in 
Perry  comity,  Ohio,  where  be  lived  for  five  years  ami  then  moved  to  Mercer 
comity,  where  lie  died  in  1838.  Joseph  Doll  and  wife  were  the  parents  of 
tin  following  children;  \nton.  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch.  John. 
Wentler,  Francis  and  Mary  Ann.  \nton  Doll  received  his  education  in 
Germany  and  then  came  to  America,  with  his  father,  in  [830,  ami  located 
in  Ohio,  where  he  lived  until  1N07.  and  then  moved  to  Otter  Tail  comity, 
Minnesota,  Inlying  four  hundred  and  seventy  acres  ,>t  land  in  Rush  Lake 
township,  a  place  which  be  cultivated  and  improved  and  made  his  home 
until  his  death  in  1881.  Mary  \nn.  the  wife  of  \  1  n ■  -i  1  Dol,  died  on  the 
home   place,   in   the  year    1<)T_>.   aged   ninety-three   years.      Anton    and    Mary 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  247 

Ann  Doll  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  John,  the  subject  of  this  sketch, 
Joseph  A.,  Anton,  Mary  Magdalena  and  Thresa  (deceased). 

John  Doll  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Mercer  county,  Ohio, 
after  which,  in  1866.  he  moved  to  Rush  Lake  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  where  he  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in 
section  12.  Later,  Mr.  Doll  added  to  his  original  farm  until  he  is  now  the 
owner  of  five  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  well  improved  and  highly  culti- 
vated land,  where  he  lived  as  an  active  farmer  until   iSoo,  when  he  retired. 

On  January  30,  r866,  John  Doll  was  married,  in  Mercer  county,  Ohio, 
td  Catherine  Weis,  who  was  born  in  Mercer  county,  on  March  31.  1841, 
the  daughter  of  Joachim  and  Barbara  (Studer)  Weis,  natives  of  Baden, 
Germany.  John  and  Katherine  Doll  are  active  members  of  St.  Lawrence 
church,  of  Otto  township. 

Joachim  Weis  was  the  son  of  John  and  Mary  Ann  (Algeier)  Weis. 
who  came  to  Ohio,  from  their  home  in  Germany,  during  the  year  1823,  and 
located  in  Mercer  county,  where  John  Weis  died  in  1867,  his  wife,  Mary 
Ann,  having  died  in  1868.  Barbara  Weis  was  the  daughter  of  Joseph  and 
Mary  Ann  Studer.  who  after  a  short  residence  in  Columbus,  Ohio,  follow- 
ing their  arrival  in  America,  moved  to  Mercer  county,  where  Joseph  Studer 
died  about   i860,  his  wife  surviving  him  unt;G  >;i,mc  years  later. 


JACOB  JUNG. 


Jacob  Jung,  well-known  farmer  of  Rush  Lake  township,  Otter  Tail 
countw  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Sheboygan  county.  Wisconsin,  on  March  27, 
[849,  the  sun  of  John  and  Katherine  (Silbernagel)  Jung,  the  former  born 
in  Germany  in  1826,  and  the  latter  in  the  same  country  in  1824.  John  Jung 
came  to  America  in  1847.  with  bis  parents,  John  Jung,  Sr..  and  wife,  and 
located  in  Sheboygan  county,  Wisconsin,  where  John  Jung.  Sr.,  died  in 
[851  :  his  wife  died  in  1847.  Katherine  Silbernagel  came  to  America  and 
located  at  Racine.  Wisconsin,  where  she  was  married  to  John  Jung.  Jr., 
after  which  they  moved  to  Sheboygan  county,  and  in  1881  came  to  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota.  After  living  in  Perham,  Minnesota,  until  1899, 
John  Jung  moved  to  Macon.  Georgia,  where  he  lived  until  his  death  in 
January,  1002.  he  being  survived  by  his  wife,  who  died  on  March  25,  [915. 
John  and  Katherine  Jung  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children,  Jacob. 
John.  Peter,  ("hrist.  Richard.  Blandina  and  Anna  Marie,  all  of  whom  are 
now  living. 

facob  Jung  was  educated  in  the  public  school-,  of  Sheboygan,  Wiscon- 
sin, after  which  he  went  to  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  for  a  shorl  time  and 
then  to  Brainard,  Minnesota,  where  he  lived  until  February,  1873.  and  then 
returned  to  Minneapolis,     In  November,  1873,  Jacob  Jung  went  to  Wiscon- 


248  OTTER    TAIT.    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

sin,  where  he  lived  two  years  and  then  he  came  to  his  farm  in  Rush  Lake 
township,  a  place  which  lie  improved  extensively  and  where  he  is  now 
engaged  in  general  farming  and  in  the  dairy  business.  The  farm  of  Jacob 
Jung  is  known  as  "Rush  Lake  Dairy  Farm." 

On  November  r6,  1876,  Jacob  Jung  was  married  to  Mary  Ottilia  Fuchs, 
who  was  born  in  Stearns  county,  Minnesota,  the  daughter  of  Balthasar  and 
Ottillia  1  Esser)  Fuchs,  who  came  front  the  state  of  Ohio  to  Stearns  county. 
Balthasar  Fuchs  died  on  December  22,  1014,  in  Saskatchewan,  Canada:  and 
his  wife  had  preceded  her  husband  in  death  by  twenty-one  years.  To  the 
marriage  of  Jacob  and  Alary  Jung  have  been  born  the  following  children: 
John  Arthur,  who  married  Elizabeth  Sheideker  and  to  whom  have  been 
born  four  children.  Robert,  Louisa,  Edward  and  Albert:  Annie  K..  who  mar- 
ried John  L.  Doll,  of  Rush  Lake  township,  and  to  whom  have  been  born 
eight  children.  Barbara.  Raymond,  Louisa,  Alois.  Arthur,  Vincent,  Robert 
and  Christ.  Jacob  Jung  and  all  of  his  family  are  active  members  of  St. 
Joseph's  church. 

Jacob  Jung  has  served  his  community  in  various  public  offices,  among 
which  are  the  offices  of  township  clerk,  assessor,  supervisor  and  treasurer. 
For  ten  years  Mr.  Jung  has  been  chairman  of  the  board  of  supervisors. 
hi  business  life  Jacob  Jung  ijs.no  less  prominently  affiliated,  he  being  presi- 
dent of  the  Farmer's  Mutual  Insurance  Company,  an  office  which  he  has 
occupied  for  fifteen  years.  Mr.  Jung  is  president  of  the  Farmer's  Creamery 
Companv.  of  Perham,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Farmer's  Shipping  Associa- 
tion, an  organization  which  he  assisted  in  organizing.  Jacob  Jung  is  presi- 
dent of  the  Perham  Rural  Telephone  Company,  and  has  been  a  member  of 
the  school  board  for  many  years,  having  served  for  six  years  as  clerk  of  the 
hoard  and    for  five  years  as  treasurer. 


THORVALD  L.  TORUD. 


Born  in    Norway,    Mav    >■>,    1N-7,  Thorvald  L.  Jorud,  an  enterprising 

Farmer  of  Henning  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  the  son  of 
Lars  and  Chestena  Jorud,  who  were  natives  of  Norway,  They  came  to 
Fillmore  county,  Minnesota,  in  1869  and  the  next  year  moved  to  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  settling  in  Eagle  Lake  township,  where  they  homesteaded 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  ,.1"  land.  There  Mr,  Jorud's  father  died  in 
1000.  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years.  His  mother  died  in  1010.  also  at  the 
age  of  eighty-four.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Amelia.  Thorvald  !...  Hans.  Thea,  Thea  and  Ole.  The  first  child  named 
Thea  is  deceased. 

Thorvald   L.   Jorud   was  educated   in   the   public   schools   of   his   native 
land.      In    [869,    when    his   parents   came   to    America,    he   accompanied    them 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  249 

to  this  country  and  settled  with  them  in  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota.  \\  hen 
Mr.  Jorud  was  old  enough,  he  took  up  farming  on  the  old  homestead.  In 
1878  he  took  a  homestead  in  Henning  township.  Having  begun  with  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acre-;  of  land,  he  has  added  to  this  original  tract  until  he 
now  owhs  four  hundred  acres  in  Henning  township.  He  has  made  general 
farming  and  stock  raising  his  business  since  coming  to  this  county  and  has 
erected  substantial  buildings  on  his   farm. 

In  January,  1891,  Thorvald  L.  Jorud  was  married  to  Paulina  Peterson, 
who  was  born  in  Norway,  in  1873,  the  daughter  of  Peter  and  Chestena 
Peterson,  who  now  live  in  South  Dakota.  Airs.  Jorud's  father  is  eighty-five 
years  old  and  her  mother  about  the  same  age.  By  his  marriage  to  Paulina 
Peterson.  Thorvald  L.  Jorud  is  the  father  of  seven  children.  Charles, 
Marlow,  Palmer,  Cornelius,  Edgar,  Joseph  and  Chester.  These  children  all 
live  at  home  with  their  parents. 

Air.  and  Airs.  Jorud  and  family  are  members  of  the  United  Lutheran 
church.  Air.  Jorud  has  devoted  himself  almost  exclusively  to  farming.  Me 
has  never  taken  any  considerable  interest  in  politics,  but  is  well  known  in 
the  township  and  popular  in  the  neighborhood  where  he  resides. 


GUSTAV  HANSON. 


Rorn  in  Norway,  May  i_\  [864,  Gustav  Hanson  is  a  son  of  Hans  and 
Sophia  Hanson,  both  of  whom  were  also  natives  of  the  same  country,  and 
who,  in  1869,  emigrated  to  Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  and  took  a  homestead 
of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land.  There  Air.  Hanson's  father  died 
in  1874.  at  the  age  of  forty-three  years.  His  mother  died  in  1875.  Hans 
Hanson  ami  wife  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  of  whom  Martha,  the 
youngest,  is  deceased.     The  living  children  arc  Gustav,  Ilaldan  and   Hannah 

Gustav  Hanson,  who  is  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Gerard  township,  Otter 
Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Dane  county,  Wis- 
consin. He  took  up  farming  early  in  life,  and  after  working  as  a  farmer 
and  thresherman  for  a  number  of  years,  came  to  Minnesota  in  18S8.  Men 
In-  rented  land  in  Yellow  Medicine  county.  Minnesota.  Subsequently  he 
purchased  eighty  acres  of  land,  hut  in  1903  -old  that  farm  and  purchased 
two  hundred  and  sixty-three  acres  in  section  |.  of  Gerard  township.  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota,  A  lake  near  Air.  Hanson's  farm  is  now  known  as 
Hanson's  lake.  Mr.  Hanson  has  sold  eighty  acres  of  this  farm  to  hi-  son, 
Henry,  lie  is  now  well  known  as  a  breeder  of  Shorthorn  cattle  and  Ches- 
ter White  hogs.  In  101 4  Air.  Hanson  built  a  new  and  attractive  residence, 
ami  all  of  his  farm  buildings  are  kept  painted  and  in  the  besl  possible  state 
of  repair.     Eightv  acres  of  the  farm  have  been  cleared  and  are  under  culti- 


250  OTTER     1'MI     COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

vation.  Mr.  Hanson's  farm  is  the  old  Mclntyre  homestead,  and  is  one  of 
the  best  in  the  township. 

On  November  29,  [888,  Gustav  Hanson  was  married  in  Yellow  .Medi- 
cine county,  Minnesota,  in  ^ndrine  Obrekke,  who  was  born  in  Norway 
in  1868.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hanson  are  the  parents  of  the  eight  children.  Henry. 
Hannah.  John,  Julius,  George,  Vnton,  Julia  and  Gusta,  all  of  whom  are 
living  with  the  exception  of  John. 

Mr.  Hanson  has  always  been  prominent  in  local  politics.  He  has 
served  as  treasurer  of  the  township  for  eighl  years,  and  as  clerk  of  the  school 
hoard  tor  nine  years,  discharging  well  the  duties  of  both  offices.  Mr.  Han- 
son is  well  known  and  highly  respected  throughout  the  township  where  he 


J.  HOWARD  WALBRIDGE. 

J.  Howard  Walbridge,  a  successful  farmer  of  Oak  Valley  township, 
<  >tter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was  horn  in  Buffalo  county,  Wisconsin,  Octo- 
ber t2,  [857,  and  is  the  son  of  Julius  and  Lucretia  (Bull)  Walbridge.  Mr. 
Walbridge's'  father  was  a  native  of  Vermont,  where  he  was  horn  in  1817, 
and  his  mother  also  a  native  of  Vermont,  born  there  in  1832. 

In  an  early  day,  the  Walbridge  family  immigrated  to  St.  Lawrence 
county,  New  York,  and  after  their  marriage  there,  Julia  and  Lucretia  (Bull) 
Walbridge  immigrated  to  Wisconsin  in  [854.  Still  later  they  moved  to 
Dakota  county,  Minnesota,  and,  for  a  number  of  years,  kept  a  hotel  at 
Lewiston.  In  [882  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Julia  Walbridge  moved  to  Fergus  Falls, 
Minnesota,  where  Mr.  Walbridge  died  in  September,  [900.  His  widow  is 
still  living  and  1-  now  eighty-three  years  old.  They  were  the  parents  of 
-even  children,  Llhanan,  J.  Howard,  Alberta  (deceased),  Judson,  Irene. 
Lillian  and  Lionel. 

Mr.  Walbridge's  paternal  grandfather,  Frank  Walbridge,  was  a  native 
of  Vermont,  who  moved  to  St.  Lawrence  county,  Xew  York,  and  in  1854 
located  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin,  where  he  died.  I  lis  wife,  who  before 
her  marriage  was  Temperence  Austin,  was  also  a  native  of  Vermont  and 
she  died  at   St.  (loud.   Minnesota,  at  the  age  of  ninetx   two  years, 

Mr.  Walbridge's  father,  the  late  Julius  Walbridge,  was  a  farmer  by 
occupation  and  a  hotel  keener.  For  a  number  of  years  lie  had  a  hotel  on 
Bismarck  avenue,   Fergus  Falls,   Minnesota. 

I.   Howard  Walbridge  was  reared  on  a   farm  and  educated  in  the  public 

5cl Is.      In    [882    he-    settled    in    Oak    Valley    township,    purchasing   eighty 

acres  of  land  in  section  11.  where  he  now  lives.  Since  that  time  he  has 
added   one   hundred   and    twenty   acres   in   sections   2   and    10,   and    now   owns 

ether  two  hundred   acres.      Mr.   Walbridge   is  a   farmer  and   stockman 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  25  I 

and  has  made  many  improvements  upon  his  farm.  His  buildings  are  all 
in  good  condition  and  are  well  painted. 

On  October  16,  1879,  J.  Howard  Walbridge  was  married  to  Margaretta 
Branch,  who  was  born  on  December  29,  1859,  in  Pennsylvania,  and  who  is 
the  daughter  of  Adam  and  Margaretta  (May)  Branch,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Germany.  They  immigrated  to  America  and  settled  first  near 
Phillipsburg,  Pennsylvania.  In  1862  or  1863,  they  moved  to  Dakota  county, 
Minnesota,  and  located  on  a  farm  near  Hastings.  About  1877  they  came 
to  Oak  Valley  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  they  subse- 
quently acquired  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land.  Mrs.  Walbridge's 
father  died  in  1885  and  her  mother  in  1889.  There  were  nine  children  in 
the  family,  of  whom  five,  Catherine,  Lewis,  Adam,  Charles  and  Benjamin, 
are  deceased.     The  living  children  are,  George.  Margaretta,  Lena  and  Frank. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  1.  Howard  have  been  the  parents  of  seven  children,  Lloyd, 
Chester.  Llewellyn,  Zi,  Mable  and  Lelah,  all  of  whom  are  living,  and  Ray- 
mond, who  died  in  infancy. 

In  politics,  Mr.  Walbridge  is  identified  with  the  Democratic  party.  He 
served  three  year-  on  the  township  board  and  also  served  as  assessor  for 
many  years.  For  twenty  years  he  was  treasurer  of  his  school  district  and 
still  holds  this  position,  lie  is  an  enterprising  farmer,  a  successful  business 
man  and  popular  among  the  people  of  Oak  Valley  township. 


:dw  \rd  parks. 


One  of  the  well-known  farmers  of  Inman  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  who  owns  two  hundred  acres  of  land  free  of  all  encumbrances, 
and  who  is  a  progressive,  up-to-date  farmer,  is  Edward  Parks,  who  was 
born  on  Big  Creek,  five  miles  west  of  Sparta,  in  Monroe  county,  Wisconsin, 
July  2,   [868, 

Mr.  Parks  is  a  son  of  George  and  Harriet  (Hodgskins)  Parks,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  New  York  state.  In  pioneer  times  the  family 
emigrated  from  New  York  and  settled  in  Wisconsin,  and  on  June  7.  1871. 
removed  from  the  latter  -late  to  Parker-  Prairie.  Minnesota,  homesteading 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acre-  of  land.  It  was  there  that  George  Parks  died 
in  November,  [900,  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  wars.  Hi-  widow  is  still  living 
and  i-  now   seventy-two  years  old. 

Edward  Park-  was  reared  on  the  farm  and  received  his  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  Parkers  Prairie.  When  old  enough  he  engaged  in 
farming  for  himself,  in  which  he  has  been  very  successful,  now  owning  two 
hundred  acre-  of  splendid  fanning  land  in  Inman  township.  In  1883  he 
purchased  eighty  acres  in  section  [6,  and  ha-  gradualh  added  to  this  original 
purchase   from  time  to  time  until  he  now    ha-  the  acreage  above  referred  to. 


-'.--'  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Mr.  Parks  has  made  many  material  and  substantial  improvements  upon  his 
farm,  and  keeps  his  farm  buildings  and  fences  in  a  good  state  of  repair. 
Besides  general  farming,  he  is  also  engaged  in  the  breeding  of  purebred 
stuck,  and  has  specialized  in  Shorthorn  cattle  and  Percheron  horses.  He  is 
an  expert  bee-keeper,  and  ordinarily  keeps  from  thirty  to  forty  hives  of  bees, 
and  makes  and  sells  quantities  of  bees-wax.  He  also  raises  sugar  cane  and 
engages  in  the  manufacture  of  sorghum  during  the  season.  Mr.  Parks  is  a 
stockholder  in  the  Henning  Shipping  Association,  and  also  in  the  Henning 
Creamery  Company,  lie  is  a  well-known  sportsman  of  the  county,  and  is 
an  extensive  breeder  of  fox  hounds,  and  of  Single  Comb  White  Leghorn 
chickens. 

In  18N4,  Edward  Parks  was  married  to  Fannie  Mason,  who  was  born 
at  Sparta,  Wisconsin,  April  17.  1866.  and  who  is  a  daughter  of  William 
Talmage  and  Harriet  Elizabeth  (Sessuns)  Mason.  Mrs.  Parks'  parents 
emigrated  from  Wisconsin  to  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  in  1871,  and 
settled  at  Parkers  Prairie.  William  T.  Mason  died  in  North  Dakota,  in 
iqoo,  at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years,  while  Harriet  Elizabeth  Mason  died 
in  Washington,  September  13.  1912,  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Edward  Parks  are  the  parents  of  four  children,  Cleon,  Glen,  Eva 
and  Dee,  all  of  whom  are  living. 

For  more  than  twenty-five  years  Edward  Parks  has  been  treasurer  of 
Inman  township,  and  is  now  serving  in  this  position.  He  is  also  treasurer 
uf  the  school  board,  and  has  served  as  supervisor  of  [nman  township.  Mr. 
Parks'  father,  who  began  with  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  was  the 
owner  uf  two  hundred  acres  at  the  tune  uf  his  death.  Other  members  of 
this  family  have  been  equally  successful,  and  all  are  rated  among  the  sub- 
stantial and  influential  citizens  of  this  county. 


(HARM'S   I'KPl'UNG. 


<  >ne  of  the  well-to-do  farmers  of  Henning  township.  Otter  Tail  county. 
Minnesota,  who  has  made  a  large  success  of  his  chosen  vocation  because 
he  has  followed  modern  methods  in  farming,  is  Charles  Peppling,  a  native 
■  if  Sweden,  where  he  was  born  on  October   13.  1862. 

Mr.  Peppling  is  the  son  of  Andrew  and  Charlotte  (Rask)  Peppling, 
both  •>!  whom  wen-  natives  "i  Sweden.  In  [883  they  came  to  America  and 
settled  in  Otter  Tail  county,  where  they  lived  with  their  son,  Charles,  until 
their  deaths.  Mr.  Pepling's  father  died  in  July,  [913,  at  the  age  of  eighty- 
two,  and  hi-  mother  in  rQo8,  at  the  age  of  seventy-three.  They  were  the 
parents  uf  seven  children,  uf  whom  four  are  deceased.  The  names  of  the 
children,  in  the  order  uf  their  births,  are:  Alfred,  deceased:  Charles.   Hulda, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    .MIXXESOTA.  253 

Mary,  deceased;  Augusta,  who  died  at  the  age  of  seven;  Anna,  and  Selma, 
deceased. 

Charles  Peppling  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  land 
and  in  r88i  came  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota.  Mr.  Peppling  walked  to 
Pelican  Rapids,  Otter  Tail  count}-,  and.  for  some  time,  worked  on  neigh- 
boring farms.  In  1887  he  moved  to  Henning  township  and  purchased  one 
hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  school  land.  Three  years  later  he  purchased 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  25,  where  he  now  lives.  All  of  the 
buildings  which  are  now  standing  upon  this  farm  Mr.  Peppling  erected. 
He  built  a  good  residence  in  1908.  Altogether  he  now  owns  four  hundred 
and  forty  acres  of  land  in  Henning  township  and  twenty  acres  of  timber  in 
Inman  township.     He  is  a  general  farmer  and  stockman. 

Mr.  Peppling  has  heen  prominent  as  a  citizen  for  many  years.  He 
served  as  supervisor  for  fifteen  years.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Henning 
Farmers'  Shipping  Association  and  in  the  Henning  Creamery  Association. 
He  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  farmers  elevator  at  Henning.  Mr.  Peppling 
is  a  member  of  the  Swedish  Baptist  church,  of  Henning.     He  is  unmarried. 


WILLIAM  J.  HENDERSON. 

Born  in  Canada,  April  13,  1864.  William  J.  Henderson,  a  prosperous 
farmer  of  Inman  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  the  son  of 
Frank  and  Sarah  (McKnight)  Henderson.  Mr.  Henderson's  father  was  a 
native  of  Ireland  and  his  mother  of  New  York  state,  born  at  Albany.  The 
former  came  to  Canada  from  Ireland  and  after  his  marriage  in  Canada. 
moved  to  Blue  Earth.  Minnesota,  in  1865,  purchasing  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  land.  In  1879  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  settled  in  Elmo 
township,  taking  a  homestead  in  section  30.  He  died  on  this  old  homestead 
farm  in  1004,  at  the  age  of  sixty-five.  His  wife  died  about  1900,  at  the  age 
of  fifty-five.  They  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  all  of  whom  are 
living,  Jennie,  William.  .Marietta  and  Marion  (twins).  Frank,  Sarah.  Anna 
and  David. 

William  J.  Henderson  was  reared  on  a  farm  in  Blue  Earth  county, 
Minnesota.  Tie  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  that  county  and 
accompanied  his  parents  in  [879  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  has  since 
been  engaged  in  fanning.  In  [896  Mr.  Henderson  purchased  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  21,  of  Inman  township.  lie  is  a  general 
farmer  and  stockman  and  has  heen  very  successful. 

In  1891  William  I.  Henderson  was  married  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Mason, 
who  was  born  in  Wisconsin  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  George  and  Harriet 
(Hodgson)  Park.  They  came  to  Parkers  Prairie.  Minnesota,  June  7.  [871. 
Mrs.  Henderson's  father  died  in    1000,  but  her  mother  is  still  living,  at   the 


-'5-1  OTTER    TAI1      COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

age  oi  seventy-two  years.  Mr  and  Mrs.  Wiliam  J.  Henderson  have  nine 
children,  all  of  whom  arc  living,  Alice,  Frank,  William.  John,  Sidney, 
Olando,   Reuben,   Nellie  and  Guy. 

Mr.  Henderson  has  served  as  township  clerk  of  Innian  township  for 
nineteen  years.  He  was  also  clerk  of  the  school  board  for  twenty  years 
The    Hendersons  arc  members  of  the   Methodist   church. 


LARS  OLSON  TOMMER  \AS. 

The  late  Lars  Olson  Tommeraas,  who  was  a  prominent  farmer  and 
well-known  educator  of  Trondhjem  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota. 
was  born  in  Norway,  in  the  year  [826,  and  following  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  his  native  country,  became  a  school  teacher,  a  profession 
which  he  pursued  until  [877,  when,  having  married.  Lars  Olson  Tommeraas 
came  to  America  and  located  in  Otter  Tail  comity,  Minnesota.  For  one 
year  after  reaching  Otter  Tail  county,  Lars  Olson  Tommeraas  continued  in 
his  \\orl<  as  a  school  teacher  and  then  preferring  farm  life,  he  bought  one 
hundred  and  -i\p  acres  of  land  in  section  30,  Trondhjem  township,  a  place 
to  which  he  added  eight}  acres,  subsequently,  and  then  followed  general 
agricultural  pursuits  until  his  death,  in   1906. 

During  the  year  [876  Lars  Olson  Tommeraas  was  married  to  Julia 
Gunderson,  who  was  horn  in  Norway  on  July  31.  1X4(1.  the  daughter  of 
well-known  people  of  her  native  locality.  Lars  Olson  and  Julia  Tommeraas 
were  the  parents  of  die  following  children:  Olaf,  who  married  Matilda 
Rudh  and  now  lives  on  the  home  farm  with  six  children.  Cyrus,  Bernice, 
Bertram,  Evelyn,  Edna  and  Curtis;  Gilbert  and  Gustov,  who  arc  deceased; 
Christina,  who  married,  Harry  Ranger,  to  whom  have  been  horn  four  chil- 
dren, Elizabeth,  Alois,  Orpha  and  Joyce;  Lewis,  cashier  of  the  Kent,  Min- 
nesota, hank,  who  married  \  mlet  Ranger,  and  to  whom  has  been  born  one 
child,  Lois;  Gilbert,  who  is  a  school  teacher;  Oscar  and  Enevold,  who  are 
twins,  the  former  who  was  married  to  Merticc  Stearns,  of  Detroit.  Minne- 
sota, in  1812,  is  assistanl  cashier  of  the  Kent.  Minnesota,  bank,  and  the 
latter  proprietor  of  a  pool  room  and  candy  store  at  McVille,  North  Dakota: 
Alma,  who  i-  a  school  teacher;  Effie  was  married  in  1015  to  Benjamin  A. 
Helland,  assistant  cashier  of  the  hank  at  Perley,  Minnesota;  Minnie,  who  is 
a  school  teacher. 

I  ars  I  Hson  [ommeraas  was  a  man  who  lived  a  most  active  and  useful 
life,  he,  while  a  resident  of  hi-  native  country,  having  served  his  commun- 
ity not  only  as  a  notably  efficient  teacher  in  the  public  schools  of  that  coun- 
try, hut  he  was  a  leader  in  public  and  official  circles  of  bis  locality,  serving 
in  various  offices  and  as  a  member  of  organizations  and  societies  having  for 
theii    objeel    the   promotion   of   the    general    welfare.      As   a   pioneer   school 


OTTER     I  Ml.    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  255 

teacher  in  Otter  Tail  count}-,  Minnesota,  Lars  Olson  Tommeraas  performed 
inestimable  service  to  his  locality  and  the  county  in  general,  giving  of  his 
time  and  experience  for  the  upbuilding  of  the  public  school  system  and  the 
training  of  the  children  of  his  township  and  the  vicinity.  In  the  death  of 
Lars  Olson  Tommeraas.  Trondhjem  township  and  Otter  Tail  county  lost 
one  of  its  most  valued  citizens. 


OLE  LYKSETT. 


The  list  of  Otter  Tail  county  agriculturists  would  be  incomplete  were 
the  name  of  Ole  Lyksett  omitted  from  these  pages.  He  has  set  an  example 
"i  steadfast  integrity,  and  stands  today  as  one  of  the  representative  men  in 
his  line,  holding  the  confidence  of  his  community,  and  giving  honest  measure 
in  return  for  all  he  receives. 

Ole  Lyksett,  farmer.  Elizabeth  township,  was  horn  on  February  28, 
t86i,  in  Wisconsin,  and  received  his  education  at  the  public  schools  of  that 
state.  Alter  his  marriage  he  located  firsl  in  Waseca  county,  where  he 
bought  one  hundred  and  sixt)  acres  and  followed  farming  until  two  years 
ago.  when  he  moved  to  this  township.  In  religion.  Mr.  Lyksett  belongs  to 
the  Lutheran  church,  in  the  work  of  winch  he  has  always  taken  an  active 
part  and  has  been  a  Sunday  school  teacher  for  many  years.  Politically,  he 
is  a  stanch  Democrat,  and  has  held  some  of  the  township  offices,  among 
them  being  that  of  school  board  trustee,  and  is  the  present  school  treasurer, 
lie  came  to  this  county  because  of  the  encouraging  prospects,  and  has  done 
well  in  a  financial  way. 

Ole  Lyksett,  father  of  the  subject  of  tins  sketch,  was  horn  in  Norway, 
and  was  united  in  marriage  with  Alline  Erikson,  also  a  native  of  that  coun 
try.  Vfter  their  marriage  they  came  to  America  about  1N50.  and  settled  111 
Wisconsin,  where  he  followed  fanning  on  a  tract  of  eighty  acres,  located 
near  Kewaunee,  where  Mr.  Lyksetl  died  in  May.  [881.  This  union  was 
blest  with  four  children:  Lars,  deceased:  Lars,  Edward,  deceased,  and  Ole. 
After  the  death  of  her  husband,  Mrs.  Lyksett  was  married  to  Ole  Christian- 
son,  by  whom  she  had  three  children:  (diaries,  Mattic  and  Lena  Christen- 
son.  Mrs.  Christenson  died  in  ioi_\  The  parents  of  Ole  Lyksett  were 
members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  and  his  stepfather  was  a  sol 
dier  in  the  Civil   War.  serving  about    -i\  months  during  the  latter  part. 

Ole  Lyksett  was  united  in  marriage,  November  17.  [890,  with  Sarah 
Vieg,  daughter  of  Syvert  Vieg.  She  was  horn  in  Norway  and  came  with 
her  parents  to  America.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lyksett  have  been  horn  six  chil- 
dren- Helen,  Sylvan,  Harold.  Eva,  Alice  and  Melvin.  Helen  is  the  only 
married  one  of  this  family  of  children.  She  became  the  wife  of  Walter 
Lloyd    and  has  one  child.     Thc\   reside  at    ^rgyle,  Minnesota. 


-W  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Syvert  V'ieg,  father  of  Mrs.  Ole  Lyksett,  was  born  in  Norway  and 
came  to  the  United  States,  where  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life. 

Mr.  Lyksett  bears  a  reputation  in  his  community  that  would  do  credit 
to  any  man  of  honest  principles.  He  is  quiet  and  unassuming  in  manner, 
and  among  those  who  know  him  he  is  held  in  high  esteem. 


MARTIN  BENSON. 


Martin  Benson,  a  well-known  citizen  of  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  and 
one  of  the  leading  business  men  of  this  city,  who  is  engaged  in  the  furniture 
and  undertaking  business,  has  achieved  success  largely  because  of  his  strict 
attention  to  business,  of  which  he  is  a  profound  student. 

Mr.  Benson  is  a  native  of  Sweden,  where  he  was  born  on  June  9,  i860. 
He  is  the  son  of  John  and  Olive  1  ( >kkerholm)  Benson,  the  former  of  whom 
was  a  painter  by  trade  and  the  latter  passed  the  greater  part  of  her  life  in 
her  native  land.  Mr.  Benson's  uncle  was  a  captain  in  the  Swedish  army 
and,  after  the  death  of  John  Benson,  he  assumed  the  place  of  a  parent  to 
young  Martin,  who  at  the  time  was  but  seven  years  old.  The  mother's 
family  has  furnished  many  professional  men  to  her  native  land. 

In  1878  Martin  Benson  came  to  America,  being  but  eighteen  years  old 
at  the  time.  He  came  direct  to  Otter  Tail  county,  obtaining  his  first  employ- 
ment in  Pelican  Rapids  with  O.  E.  Blyberg,  with  whom  he  remained  for  six 
or  seven  months.  Realizing  the  advantage  of  an  education,  he  attended  the 
public  schools  and  acquired  a  good  education.  He  afterward  learned  the 
trade  of  a  flour-miller,  which  occupation  he  followed  for  twenty-two  years, 
during  which  time  he  was  head  miller  of  several  different  mills.  In  1888, 
being  then  at  Red  Lake  Falls,  he  was  called  by  Joe  Featherstone,  who  knew 
his  ability  as  a  miller,  to  come  to  Fergus  Falls  to  take  charge  of  the  old  Red 
River  null,  which  .Mr.  Featherstone  hail  rented.  Mr.  Benson  came  to  Fer- 
gus Falls,  remodeled  the  mill  and  conducted  it  for  one  year.  when,  being 
offered  tin-  po  head  miller  of  the  new  Otter  Tail  mill,   which   was 

jusl  completed,  he  accepted  and  continued  as  its  bead  miller  for  seven  years. 

In  May,  [898,  VIr.  Benson  desired  to  engage  in  the  furniture  and  under- 
taking business,  confident  that  there  was  an  opening  for  such  business,  and 
his  wonderful  success  has  proved  the  wisdom  of  the  course  he  pursued, 
rle  opened  a  store  in  a  small  way  on  the  north  side  of  Lincoln  avenue  and 
his  business  increased  50  rapidly  that  six  months  later  he  secured  a  larger 
building  in  the  Ulen  and  Cuttler  block  on  Lincoln  avenue  west.  In  [903, 
he  purchased  a  block  on  Hi.  cornet  of  Lincoln  ami  Court  street,  where  he  is 
at  present  engaged  in  the  same  line  of  business,  which  ha-  grown  to  such  an 
extent  thai  hi'  occupies  the  entire  block  from  the  main  street  back  to  the 
alley,  three  stories   high       He  carries  one  oi  the  largest  and  best  selected 


MARTIN    I'.KNSUN 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  257 

stocks  of  furniture,  carpets,  rugs,  draperies,  linoleums  and  undertaking  sup- 
plies anywhere  in  the  Northwest.  Mr.  Benson  is  one  of  the  first  state 
licensed  embalmers  in  the  Northwest  and  is  considered  one  of  the  foremost 
and  most  progressive  funeral  directors  in  the  state. 

In  1914,  Air.  Benson  added  to  his  already  large  establishment  a  new 
and  up-to-date  funeral  chapel  with  a  seating  capacity  of  at  least  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty,  which  is  absolutely  free  to  patrons  wishing  to  make  use  of  it 
for  funeral  occasions.  In  connection  with  the  chapel,  the  upper  floor  is  the 
casket  show  room,  where  such  goods  can  be  found  from  the  cheapest  to  the 
best.  In  another  department  in  the  same  building  is  contained  the  embalm- 
ing room,  dressing  room,  etc.,  equipped  with  all  modern  improvements  and 
appliances.  The  building  is  steam-heated,  electric-lighted,  has  water  and 
sew  er  connections  and  no  expense  has  been  spared  in  making  this  establish- 
ment the  best  of  its  knid  in  the  Northwest. 

Mr.  Benson  has  held  many  important  offices  in  the  Minnesota  State 
Funeral  Directors  Association  and  has  had  the  honor  to  attend  a  great  many 
national  conventions  as  state  delegate,  which  has  been  both  instructive  and 
enjoyable. 

Always  interested  in  the  welfare  and  prosperity  of  the  city  of  Fergus 
Falls,  Mr.  Benson  has  contributed  both  time  and  money  to  that  end  and 
was  once  a  member  of  the  city  council.  Mr.  Benson  is  also  interested  in 
many  different  enterprises  in  the  city  and  is  one  of  the  directors  in  the  new 
Farmers  and  Merchants  State  Bank  and  is  in  possession  of  a  good  deal  of 
property,  otherwise  including  a  handsome  new  home  just  completed. 

.Mr.  Benson  is  an  active  member  in  the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Daughters  of  Rebekah,  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Royal  Arcanum,  the  Modern  Woodmen, 
the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  and  the  Chippewa  Club. 

A I  r.  Benson  was  married  at  Pelican  Rapids,  Minnesota,  in  1882,  to 
Julia  Moe,  a  native  of  Norway,  who  came  to  America  with  her  mother, 
sisters  and  brothers  when  she  was  but  seven  years  old,  her  father  having 
died  in  Norway.  They  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  Otter  Tail  county. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benson  are  the  parents  of  f<>ur  children,  as  follow:  Otto  D.. 
Mary  A.,  Bennie  \.  and  Annie  R.  Of  these  children.  Otto  married  Effie 
Carsten  and  has  one  son,  Donald.  Annie  married  Robert  Vedeen,  of 
Detroit,  Minnesota,  and  has  one  son,  <  )ttis.  Otto  and  Bennie  are  employed 
in  their  father's  establishment.  Mary  is  a  school  teacher.  All  of  the  chil- 
dren are  graduates  of  the  Fergus  Falls  high  school. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benson  and  family  are  devoted  members  of  the  Nor- 
wegian Lutheran  Synodical  church,  to  which  they  have  belonged  for  thirt.3 
fi-h> 


258  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

years  and  where  their  children  have  all  been  baptized  and  confirmed.  They 
arc  all  enjoying  high  esteem  and  respect  in  the  church  as  well  as  in  the 
entire  community. 


OLE  ANDREW  OLSEN  BONLIE. 

Among  the  well-known  and  successful  men  of  Otter  Tail  county  is  Ole 
Andrew  Olsen  Bonlie,  who  is  a  native  of  Norway,  having  been  born  in  that 
country  on  April  19,  1850,  being  the  son  of  Hansold  and  Kare  Olsen,  both 
of  whom  were  born  in  Norway.  The  Olsens  came  to  the  United  States  in 
[856,  at  first  locating  at  Black  Earth,  Dane  count)',  Wisconsin.  In  1858 
they  removed  to  Iowa  county,  where  they  remained  for  four  years,  after 
which  they  took  up  their  residence  in  McLeod  county,  Minnesota,  in  1862, 
and  in  1877  they  moved  to  Clay  county,  this  state,  where  the  mother  died 
in  188S;  the  father  died  at  Fargo.  North  Dakota,  in  1901. 

Ole  Andrew  Olsen  Bonlie  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of 
Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  and  in  the  schools  of  Iowa  comity.  After  com- 
pleting his  education,  he  became  a  carpenter  and  engineer,  which  occupa- 
tions he  followed  for  many  years.  Mr.  Bonlie  also  devoted  much  of  his 
time  to  farming,  in  which  he  has  been  successful.  His  first  farm  was  a 
homestead,  which  he  entered  in  1877,  in  Clay  county,  Minnesota.  He  was 
located  in  Morehead  at  this  time  and  worked  at  his  trades.  Although  not 
active  in  the  cultivation  of  his  farm,  he  was  always  interested  in  agriculture. 

After  a  residence  of  some  years  in  Morehead,  Mr.  Bonlie  sold  his 
farm  near  there  and  in  1880  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  purchased 
eight}-  acres  of  land  in  section  9,  Candor  township.  By  close  application 
and  diligent  work  he  has  improved  the  tract  until  today  he  has  one  of  the 
besl  developed  farms  in  the  township,  with  good  buildings  and  fences.  Mr. 
Bonlie  practices  general  farming  and  devotes  much  of  his  time  to  the  raising 
of  much  stock,  both  of  which  receives  his  most  careful  attention. 

Ole  \.  O  Bonlie  was  married,  in  1873,  to  Bertha  Frederickson,  who 
was  horn  in  Norway,  July  _'5.  [853,  where  she  grew  to  womanhood  and 
received  her  education.  Her  mother,  Ellen  Frederickson,  died  the  same  year 
that  Mrs.  Bonlie  was  born,  and  her  father.  Frederick  Frederickson,  died 
when  she  was  a  mere  child.  She  remained  in  her  native  country  until  she 
was  nineteen  years  oi  age,  al  which  time  she  came  to^Arnerica  and  settled 
in  Minnesota. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bonlie  are  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Caro- 
lina, Anton  Herman,  Edward,  Hattie,  Anton,  Charles,  Fred.  Anna  and 
Bertha,  all  of  whom  are  alive  with  the  exception  of  Carolina.  Anton  Her- 
man and  Charles. 


OTTER    TATL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  259 

JOHN  NORDGAARD. 

A  well-known  and  prosperous  farmer  of  Trondhjem  township,  Otter 
Tail  count}-,  Minnesota,  is  John  Nordgaard,  who  was  born  in  Norway, 
March  28,  1864,  he  being  the  son  of  Staius  and  Mana  Nordgaard,  who 
were  natives  of  Norway.  Staius  Nordgaard  came  to  America  in  1867,  and 
settled  in  Fillmore  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  lived  for  four  years  and 
then  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county  and  homesteaded  eighty  acres  of  land  in 
Trondhjem  township,  section  9,  a  place  to  which  the  elder  Nordgaard  added 
eighty  acres,  at  a  later  time,  and  where  he  now  lives  in  retirement.  Mana, 
the  wife  of  Staius  Nordgaard,  died  in  1876.  Staius  and  Mana  Nordgaard 
were  the  parents  of  two  children.  Staal  and  John. 

Following  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Fillmore  and  Otter  Tail 
counties,  Minnesota,  John  Nordgaard  became  a  farmer,  taking  possession 
of  Lhe  home  farm,  a  place  to  which  Mr.  Nordgaard  added  eighty  acres  and 
where  he  now  lives  and  cultivated  his  choice  farm  of  two  hundred  and 
forty  acres.  In  addition  to  his  general  farming,  John  Nordgaard  engages 
in  the  raising  of  considerable  good  grade  live  stock. 

During  the  year  iSqq  John  Nordgaard  was  married  to  Dena  Rynes,  a 
native  of  Otter  Tail  county,  and  the  daughter  of  Bernt  and  Ellena  Rynes, 
who  came  from  Norway  to  America  in  1870,  and  located  in  Otter  Tail 
county,  where  Bernt  Rynes  now  lives  a  retired  life.  John  and  Dena  Nord- 
gaard are  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Ella  and  Mabel  (twins), 
Selmer,  Ehvena  and  Bertha.  In  the  year  1908  Dena,  the  wife  of  John 
Nordgaard.  died,  after  which,  in  the  year  IQ12,  Mr.  Nordgaard  was  mar- 
ried, secondly,  to  Mar)-  Watternoe,  of  Trondhjem  township.  To  this  mar- 
riage no  children  have  been  born. 


WILLIAM  C.  KRUEGER. 

Among  the  well-known  farmers  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  the 
proprietor  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  section  2,  of  Bluffton  town- 
ship, and  an  active  dairyman  in  this  community  is  the  man  whose  name 
heads  this  biographical  sketch. 

William  C.  Krueger  was  horn  in  Dodge  county,  Wisconsin,  on  April 
28,  [862,  the  son  of  William  and  Wilhelmina  (NelD  Krueger,  both  natives 
of  Germany,  the  former  born  in  1838  and  the  latter  about  1840.  The 
paternal  grandfather.  Christian  Krueger,  came  to  America  about  1842  and 
settled  in  Jefferson  county,  near  \\  atertown,  Wisconsin,  where  he  lived  until 
his  death.  He  was  the  father  of  live  children,  Fred.  John.  August,  William 
and  a  daughter. 

William  Krueger,  the   lather  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  brought 


260  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

b)  his  parents  to  America  at  the  tender  age  of  four  years,  and.  the  family 
having  settled  in  Jefferson  county,  Wisconsin,  was  reared  to  manhood  in 
that  county.  Wilhelmina  Nell  came  to  America  with  other  members  of  her 
family  when  a  girl  of  fifteen  years  of  age  and  settled  in  Woodland,  Wis- 
consin. She  met  her  future  husband,  William  Krueger,  in  Dodge  count}', 
Wisconsin,  and  was  married  to  him  in  that  county.  William  Krueger  had 
been  a  farmer  and  merchant  at  Hustis  Fort,  Wisconsin,  but  removed  from 
thai  place  in  the  spring  of  1X76  to  Good  Thunder,  Blue  Earth  county.  Min- 
nesota, where  he  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  for  one  year.  After 
selling  oui  his  business  interests  in  Good  Thunder,  he  removed  to  Hender- 
son, Minnesota,  where  he  bought  a  farm  comprising  two  hundred  acres  of 
partially  improved  land  in  Sibley  county,  where  he  lived  until  the  fall  of 
1913.  He  then  sold  this  farm  and  removed  to  a  farm  about  one  and  one- 
half  miles  from  St.  Peter,  adjoining  the  farm  of  the  asylum,  where  he  died 
on  August  1.  mil  Mis  beloved  wife  survived  him  and  is  still  living  at  a 
very  mature  age. 

I<>  William  and  Wilhelmina  (Nell)  Krueger  were  born  nine  children. 
as  follow:  Frank,  a  fanner  living  near  Drake.  North  Dakota;  William  C. 
the  subject  of  this  sketch;  Fred,  who  died  at  the  age  of  thirty  years  at 
Henderson;  Julius,  a  traveling  salesman  living  at  Flasher,  North  Dakota; 
Peter,  a  farmer  residing  at  Bemidji;  Flora,  who  married  Adolphus  Boden, 
and  died  quite  earl)  m  life;  Anna,  the  wife  of  Paul  Carpenter,  who  lives 
at  St.  Peter,  Minnesota :  Philip,  who  lives  at  New  Salem.  North  Dakota. 
and  Albert,  who  farms  the  home   farm  near  St.  Peter. 

William  C.  Krueger  received  his  elementary  education  in  the  evening 
schools  of  St.  Paul,  where  be  had  gone  as  a  young  man  to  make  his  way  in 
the  world.  Alter  working  in  various  wholesale  houses  in  St.  Paul  for  about 
fifteen  years,  he  removed  to  Buffalo  Lake.  Renville  county.  Minnesota, 
where  he  engaged  in  the  saloon  business  for  a  period  of  six  years.  While 
working  in  St.  Paul  he  had  invested  his  savings  in  railroad  land  situated  111 
1  liter  Tail  and  Wadena  counties.  Consequently,  in  1905,  upon  (putting  the 
saloon  business  in  Buffalo  Fake,  he  moved  to  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres  in  section  2,  of  Bluffton  township,  which  he  had  but  recently 
purchased.  This  land  had  been  homesteaded,  and,  aside  from  a  few  log 
buildings,  contained  no  further  improvements.  Determined  to  improve  the 
farm,  Mr.  Krueger  began  to  clear  the  land,  to  build  fences  and  to  erect  a 
frame  house.  Later  he  enlarged  his  house  and,  in  the  fall  of  iou.  erected 
.1    new    and   modern   barn,   thirty  by  ninelv     feel,   with   two   additions,    fourteen 

irty-two    feet,   and    ten   b\    twelve    feet,    the  latter  being  a   milk   room. 

William   ( '.    Krueger   has   made   a    specialty   of   dairying    and    keeps    on    an 

from  twentv  to  thirtv  cows,  all  of  high  grade  stock,     lie  has  a 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  26l 

silo  and  in  fact  is  up-to-date  and  modern  in  every  detail.  In  addition  to 
his  home  farm,  he  still  possesses  the  railroad  land  comprising  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres. 

On  September  2,  1891,  William  C.  Krueger  was  married  to  Mary 
Zeigo,  a  native  of  Grafton,  Ozaukee  county.  Wisconsin,  the  daughter  of 
Charles  Zeigo,  an  old  settler  of  that  state.  Charles  Zeigo  was  a  soldier  in 
the  Civil  War,  having  served  in  Company  C,  Thirty-fourth  Regiment,  Wis- 
consin Volunteer  Infantry.  He  died  at  Winona,  Minnesota,  at  the  home  of 
his  son,  Herman,  on  March  23.  191 5.  at  the  age  of  ninety-three  years.  His 
remains  were  interred  in  Fergus  Falls,  beside  those  of  his  wife,  who  died 
on  October  24,  1897.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Krueger  have  been  born  three 
children,  namely:  William  A.,  born  on  July  18.  1892;  Arthur  H.,  Novem- 
ber 26,  181)7,  and  Louis  E.  (Pat).  May  6,  1901. 

William  C.  Krueger  has  been  prominent  in  the  political  circles  of 
Bluffton  township,  and,  as  a  Republican,  has  served  as  both  school  treasurer 
and  a-  justice  of  the  peace.  Both  he  and  his  beloved  wife  are  devoted 
members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Order  of  the 
Sons  of  Herman.  He  has  commanded  the  respect  and  esteem  of  the  people 
of  Bluffton  township  and  is  well  known  in  the  social  and  agricultural  circles 
of  his  community. 


CHARLES  H.   BOWMAX. 

Among  the  respected  and  successful  agriculturists  of  Eagle  Lake  town- 
ship, (  >tter  Tail  county,  Minnesota.  Charles  H.  Bowman  is  a  worthy  citizen. 
He  is  a  native  of  St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  his 
birth  occurred  on  January  17.  1875.  He  is  one  of  six  children  born  to  the 
union  of  James  H.  and  Mary  L.  (Caldwell)  Bowman,  natives  of  New  York 
and  Ohio,  respectively.  The  names  of  their  children  follow,  in  the  order  of 
their  birth:  John  R.,  Belle.  J.  P..  Melissa,  Charles  and  Kattie.  Jam-  II 
Bowman  removed  from  his  native  state  to  Ohio,  but  shortly  after  changed 
hi-  location  to  Wisconsin,  where  he  met  and  married  Mary  L.  Caldwell.  In 
1873  they  removed  to  St.  Olaf  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and 
in  [875  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  (under  the  soldier's 
right),  which  was  under  the  direct  management  of  James  H.  Bowman  until 
his  death,  on  July  to,  1909.  During  the  Civil  War  he  enlisted  in  Company 
K.  Twenty-second  Regiment.  Wisconsin  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served 
his  country  as  a  brave  and  loyal  soldier  for  three  years.  Mary  L.  Caldwell 
was  a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Ann  Caldwell,  who  died  in  the  state  of  Ohio 
and  St.  Olaf  township,  Titter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  respectively.  The 
paternal  grandfather  of  Charles  IT.  Bowman  was  James  Bowman,  a  native 
<>f   New  York,  whose  death  occurred  in  that   state.      His  wife  died  in   Iowa. 


262  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

I  harles  H.  Bowman  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  .Minnesota,  and  has  always  remained  on  the  old  home  place,  where 
his  mother,  Alar)-  L.  (Caldwell)  Bowman,  also  lives.  In  1901  Charles  H. 
Bowman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Amanda  Edlund,  and  they  are  the  par- 
ents of  these  children:     Lorena,  Ernest,  Clifford  and  Vernon. 

Charles  II.  Bowman,  his  wife  and  mother  are  all  members  of  the  Pres- 
byterian  church,  and  are  actively  engaged  in  the  support  and  advancement 
of  this  denomination.  Charles  H.  Bowman  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of 
\  eterans,  and  is  now  serving  his  fourth  year  as  township  assessor.  He  was 
clerk  of  school  district  No.  114  for  seven  years,  and  for  the  past  two  years 
has  been  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Midway  Mutual  Telephone  Company. 


JOHN  DUBEROWSKI. 


John  Duberowski  is  a  native  of  Ohio,  being  born  there  on  May  15, 
1872.  His  parents,  William  and  Wilhelmina  (Brockop)  Duberowski,  were 
natives  of  Germany.  The  father  of  John  Duberowski  came  to  America  in 
1 87 1  and  after  his  marriage  settled  in  Cleveland,  where  he  worked  in  a 
car-shop  and  lived  for  ten  years.  He  brought  his  family  to  Minnesota  in 
1880  and  bought  the  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  where  he  and  his 
son,  John,  now  live,  and  where  his  wife  died.  Their  children  are  John, 
Emma  and  Ida.  By  a  previous  marriage,  Mrs.  Duberowski  was  the  mother 
of  three  children,  whose  father's  name  was  Schultz.  These  children  are 
named  Gusta,  Andrew  and  Minnie. 

John  Duberowski  had  only  limited  educational  advantages.  Attending 
the  local  schools  he  was  obliged  to  discontinue  his  education  in  order  to 
make  a  livelihood.  Purchasing  forty  acres  about  one  mile  southeast  of  his 
present  home,  he  began  his  independent  career  as  a  farmer.  He  later 
acquired  forty  acres  more  and  after  eleven  years'  residence  there,  he  returned 
to  the  old  home  place,  where  lie  has  erected  all  of  the  buildings  excepting 
the  dwelling,  lie  now  owns  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  and  his  father 
IS   the  owner  of    fort}'  acres. 

On  December  27,  1898,  John  Duberowski  was  married  to  Anna  Broc- 
kopp,  who  was  born  in  German]  1  mi  September  jo,  t88o,  and  came  to 
America  at  the  age  of  three  with  her  parents.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Fred 
and  Wilhelmina  Brockopp,  of  Effiington  township,  this  county.  They  came 
from  Germany  in  [883.  The  mother  died  in  1911,  her  husband  having  pre- 
lier  in  January,  1903.  lie  farmed  on  eighty  acres  of  land.  Mrs. 
Duberowski  ha-  three  sisters  and  one  brother,  nameh  :  Bertha,  Gusta,  Otto 
and  Emma,  named  in  the  order  of  their  birth,  she  being  the  third  born.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Duberowski  were  horn  s,\  children,  of  whom  the  eldest  son. 
Tohnie,  who  was  limn  on  January    22.   iqoo.   is  deceased.     The  others  are: 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  263 

Paul,  born  on  September  6,  1902;  Vivian,  November  5,  1906;  Lulu,  Octo- 
ber 9,  1909;  Myrtle,  May  25,  1911,  and  Geneva,  March  22.  1913.  Their 
parents  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  church,  which  was  also  the 
religious  affiliation  of  Mrs.  Duderowski's  family. 

Such  has  been  Mr.  Duderowski's  activity  outside  of  his  vocational 
work  that  he  has  retained  a  keen  interest  in  all  that  concerns  the  welfare 
of  the  commonwealth  in  which  be  lives.  A  devoted  father  and  husband,  a 
kind,  considerate  neighbor,  a  man  of  broad  sympathies,  it  is  not  surprising 
that  he  has  many  rinse  friends  among  the  residents  of  this  county. 


JOHN  BYE. 


John  Bye  is  one  of  those  men  who.  by  diligent  effort  and  honesty,  have 
earned  the  respect  of  thejr  fellow  citizens  and  a  comfortable  competency  as 
well.  He  is  a  native  of  Norway  and  is  the  son  of  Nels  and  Martha  (Han- 
snn  1  live,  also  natives  of  Norway,  who  remained  in  their  native  land  until 
their  deaths.  Nels  Bye  was  a  farmer  and  the  father  of  three  sons :  Ole, 
Christian  and  John,  John  being  the  second  born. 

John  Bye  emigrated  to  \merica  in  1872,  at  the  age  of  twenty-three 
years  of  age,  his  birth  having  occurred  on  January  1,  1849.  Finding  the 
education  already  received  inadequate  to  the  needs  of  his  new  life,  he 
attended  school  for  one  winter  after  his  arrival  in  this  country.  For  seven 
years  he  engaged  in  various  occupations,  mostly  in  Wisconsin,  and  in  1879 
removed  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  engaged  in  agricultural 
pursuits.  In  t88o  he  was  successful  in  winning  the  hand  of  Liza  Kjer  and, 
with  the  new  responsibilities  of  home  making,  he  became  interested  in 
operating  for  himself.  With  this  view  in  mind,  an  homestead  was  pur- 
chased  consisting  of  one  hundred  and  twenty-three  acres,  located  in  Eagle 
lake  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  immediate  improvements 
w<re  begun.  Forty  acres  have  been  added  to  the  original  property,  and  it  is 
now  well  improved.  There  have  been  born  three  children  to  the  union  of 
John  Bye  and  Liza  Kjer,  namely:  Martha,  Nels  J.  and  Hans  A.  Mrs.  Bye 
died  "ii  February  -'.  [909.  John  Byi  is  a  member  of  the  Norwegian  Luth- 
eran church,  in  which  his  wife  was  also  an  earnest  worker. 

John  Bye  has  proven  hi-  worth  to  the  community  by  his  having  been 
appointed  to  offices  of  trust,  time  and  again,  holding  the  office  of  township 
assessor  for  a  period  of  seventeen  years.  He  has  also  served  his  fellow 
citizens  in  the  capacity  of  township  clerk  and  as  justice  of  the  peace,  also  as 
clerk  of  the  school  district,  and  has  been  secretary  of  the  church  congrega- 
tion the  past  thirty-three  wars.  That  be  his  discharged  all  duties  to  the 
best  of  his  ability  and  has  given  conscientious  service,  denotes  him  to  be  of 
Sterling  character  and  the  confidence  reposed  in  him  has  not  been  misplaced. 


_>(>4  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

KNUT   X.   SONMOR. 

Like  many  of  the  prosperous  and  progressive  tanners  of  St.  Olaf 
townhsip,  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  Knut  X.  Sonmor,  of  this  -ketch, 
has  found  time  from  his  busy  life  to  devote  a  part  of  his  talents  and  ability 
to  the  welfare  of  the  community,  as  a  result  of  which  he  is  one  of  those 
citizens  who  have  won  a  place  of  note  among  the  men  of  the  township  and 
county  for  their  efforts  and  unselfish  interest  in  the  development  and 
advancement  of  their  communities.  As  a  result  of  his  success  in  agricul- 
tural pursuits  and  because  of  his  place  in  the  public  life  of  the  locality. 
Knut  X.  Sonmor  is  entitled  to  a  place  among  the  prominent  citizens  of  the 
community. 

Knut  X.  Sonmor  was  born  on  the  Sonmor  homestead  in  St.  Olaf  town- 
ship, Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  on  October  22,  1869,  the  son  of  Nels 
and  I'ettronille  Sonmor,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway.  Nels 
Sonmor  was  a  farmer  of  that  country  until  the  year  1866,  when  he  came 
to  America  and  after  a  year  of  residence  in  the  state  of  Iowa,  he  came  to 
St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  I  ail  county,  Minnesota,  and  secured  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  land,  on  which  he  built  a  log  cabin  for  a  home,  aftet 
which  he  broke  up  the  sod  of  his  new  possession,  cultivating  his  land  suc- 
cessfully and  later  added  to  his  holdings  until  he  was  the  owner  of  three 
hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  well-tilled  and  highly-productive  land.  From 
the  days  when  this  pioneer  farmer  came  to  St.  Olaf  township,  making  the 
trip  from  St.  (loud.  Minnesota,  by  ox  team,  until  later  when  he  was  a  well- 
to-do  farmer,  he  was  compelled  to  suffer  many  privations  and  hardships, 
due  to  the  distance  from  market,  where  he  could  sell  his  produce  and  bin 
his  supplies;  but  with  a  spirit  >'i  determination  and  a  persevering  nature, 
Nels  Sonmor  was  able  to  rise  above  his  drawbacks  and  become  one  of  the 
more  prosperous  nun  of  agricultural  life  in  the  community.  Xcls  Sonmor 
and  his  wife  were  the  parents  of  live  children,  Jacob  Knut.  the  subjeel  of 
tin-  sketch,  Martin.  Nels  and  Mary.  In  church  circles  Nels  Sonmor  was  a 
man  known  to  be  especially  active,  giving  largely  of  his  time  and  effort  for 
the  work  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church,  of  which  he  was  a  prominent 
member.      Politically,  the  elder   Sonmor  was  an  ardent    Republican, 

Knut  X  Sonmor  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  St. 
Olaf  township,  <  M ter  'fail  county,  Minnesota,  after  which  he  helped  his 
father  on  the  home  farm  for  some  lime.  In  the  year  1N01  he  went  to  Polk 
county,  Minnesota,  where  be  engaged  in  the  restaurant  business  for  three 
wars,  following  which  he  returned  to  St.  Olaf  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
and  rented  a  farm  on  which  he  lived  for  about  two  years,  [n  the  year 
[805,  after  his  marriage,  Knut  X.  Sonmor  went  to  Wadena  county,  Minne- 
sota, where  h<   homesteaded  eighty  acres  of  land,  where  he  farmed  until  the 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  265 

year  [898,  at  which  time  he  came  hack  to  Tordenskjold  township,  this 
county,  and  bought  eighty  acres  of  land,  farming  there  until  the  year  1900, 
when  he  bought  the  old  home  farm  of  one  hundred  and  ninety-six  acre-. 
where  he  now  lives,  engaged  in  general  farming  and  stock  raising. 

During  the  year  1005  Knut  X.  Sonmor  was  married  to  Alary  Johnson, 
who  was  horn  on  November  jt.  [869,  the  daughter  of  Ole  Jensen  and  wife, 
and  to  this  marriage  have  been  born  the  following'  children:  Mae.  Julia. 
Ruth,  Oscar,  (dare,  Johnnie  and  Nellie.  Knut  X.  Sonmor  and  his  familv 
are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheian  church. 

In  the  public  and  official  life  of  St.  Olaf  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  Knut  X.  Sonmor  has  taker,  his  part  willingly,  and  he  is  a  citizen 
who  for  seven  years  served  the  office  of  township  assessor  and  for  six  years 
served  as  treasurer  of  the  school  board,  with  well-known  ability  and  tact. 
Politically.  Mr.  Sonmor  is  independent  of  party  in  local  affairs,  preferring 
to  be  of  use  and  service  to  his  community  wherever  he  can.  without  regard 
to  party  or  creed. 


CLAES  ALFRED  LUNDBERG. 

Far  away  Sweden  has  contributed  mam  a  thrifty  farmer  and  good 
citizen  to  this  county,  none  of  win  mi  stands  higher  than  Claes  Lundberg, 
who  came  here  with  his  parents  when  he  was  only  fifteen  year--  old.  He 
was  burn  in  Sweden,  February  17,  [856,  and  is  the  sun  of  Johanas  and 
Mary  (Anderson)  Lundberg,  both  natives  of  Sweden.  The  mother  of 
Claes  Lundberg  was  the  second  wife  of  his  father,  with  whom  she  came  to 
America  in  [871.  'I  hey  journeyed  from  St.  Cloud  to  Parkers  Prairie  in  a 
primitive  wagon  drawn  by  two  faithful  oxen.  It  was  July  25  or  2~  when 
they  arrived  in  the  littl  town  which  for  many  years  has  been  their  home 
and  thai  of  their  children.  Mr.  Lundberg,  while  a  carpenter,  also  acquired 
one  hundred  and  sixty-acres  in  Eastern  township  as  a  hometsead,  and  here 
he  died  Dii  March  21,  1873,  leaving  a  widow  and  two  children,  the  eldest 
being  the  subject  of  tin--  sketch  and  the  youngest  being  Fred,  who  is  now  a 
farmer  in  Plentywood,  Montana.  The  mother  lived  until  October  15,  [882. 
By  a  previous  marriage,  Mr.  Lundberg  was  the  father  of  six  children,  all  of 
whom  an'  deceased. 

Claes  A.  Lundberg.  who  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Swe 
den.  came  to  lln^  country  in  his  youth  and  on  March  7.  1N77.  took  up  a 
homestead  of  a  quarter  section  where  he  now  lives,  in  section  jo.  Eastern 
township.     Here  he  cleared  the  laud  and  built  a  home  and  other  equipment. 

In  1884  Claes  V  Lundberg  was  married  to  Tilda  Anderson,  who  was 
born  in  Sweden,  where  her  father.  Vndres  Anderson,  lived  and  died.  Onl) 
one    child,    a    son,     \uguM      \lfred.    is    at    In. me.    the    other    child,    a    daughter, 


266  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.     MINNESOTA. 

named  Mary  Alfield,  being  deceased.  Mrs.  Tilda  Lundberg  died  on  Decem- 
ber 26,  1914.  Mr.  Lundberg  has  been  prominent  in  this  community  and 
has  served  as  supervisor  and  member  of  the  school  board.  He  is  an  enter- 
prising  and  painstaking  workman,  a  loyal  citizen,  upholding  always  the 
good,  a  devoted  husband  and  father,  and  a  man  whose  conduct  and  career 
have  been  guided  by  principles  of  right  and  justice. 


LAWRENCE  P.  STENSTROM. 

Lawrence  P.  Stenstrom,  who  for  more  than  thirty-six  years  has  been 
an  active  minister  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church,  in  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  was  born  in  Sweden  on  Tune  18.  1843,  he  being  the  son  of  Jacob 
Peter  Stenstrom  and  Gustava  Elizabeth  Martinson,  both  of  whom  were  born 
in  Sweden.  Jacob  Peter  Stenstrom  died  in  1845.  His  widow,  Gustava 
Elizabeth  Stenstrom,  were  the  parents  of  two  children,  John  J.  and  Law- 
rence Peter,  J.  P.  Stenstrom  and  his  family  were  active  members  of  the 
Swedish  Lutheran  church  in  their  native  country. 

Lawrence  Peter  Stenstrom  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  country,  and  after  his  marriage,  in  Sweden,  he  came  to  .America  in 
1872  and  located  in  the  state  of  Pennsylvania,  near  the  city  of  Warren, 
where  Mr.  Stenstrom  made  his  home  for  seven  years  and  then  moved  to 
Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota.  On  reaching  Otter  Tail  county,  Lawrence 
Peter  Stenstrom  became  the  minister  of  the  Elizabeth,  Minnesota,  Swedish 
Lutheran  church,  he  since  having  been  in  charge  of  the  church  at  Fergus 
Falls.  Pelican  Rapids,  Erhardt  and  Amor.  The  Reverend  Stenstrom  is  now 
the  minister  to  the  churches  at  Elizabeth  and  at  Erhardt,  Minnesota.  Law- 
rence Peter  Stenstrom  has  been  a  minister  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran 
church  during  a  term  of  thirty-six  years.  Tn  addition  to  his  ministerial 
work,  the  Reverend  Stenstrom  cares  for  the  activities  on  his  farm  of  one 
hundred  and   two  acres,   located  in   Elizabeth   township,  Otter  Tail  county. 

Lawrence  I '.  Stenstrom,  on  January  21,  1866,  was  married  to  Julia 
Charlotte  Stenstrom,  and  to  this  marriage  have  been  horn  nine  children, 
Svan.  Gothold,  Samuel,  T'oseph,  Gabriel,  I'.ina.  Ruth.  Miriam  and  Nina 


LAURITS  M.  HEGGEN. 

Laurits  M.  Heggen,  the  -on  ,,f  Martin  L.  and  \1111  lleggen.  was  born 
in  Fillmore  county,  this  state,  on  March  28,  1872.  The  parent-  were  natives 
of  Norway  and  came  to  the  United  States  in  [869,  landed  in  the  Xew  York 
and  moved  direct  to  Fillmore  county,  where  the  father  worked  for  others 
For  seme  four  years.  \fier  deciding  to  seek  a  new  location,  he  walked  to 
Ottei    Tail  countv,  where  he  purchased  eisrhtv  acres  of  land  and  then  returned 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  267 

afoot  to  his  home  tor  his  family.  Having  them  established  in  their  new 
home  he  returned  with  an  ox  team  for  the  family  supplies.  He  later  bought 
more  land.  He  lived  for  seven  or  eight  years  in  Fergus  Falls,  but  returned 
to  the  home  farm  two  years  ago.  where  he  now  lives,  the  wife  having  died 
in  1914.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Heggen  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Ingaborg,  Christine,  Laurits,  Adolph  i  deceased  ) .  Anton,  Julia,  Samuel  and 
Martin. 

Laurits  M.  Heggen  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of 
Otter  Tail  county,  where  he  has  lived  the  greater  part  of  his  life.  On 
March  9,  1898,  he  was  married  to  Carrie  Rude,  who  was  a  native  of  Nor- 
way. They  are  the  parents  of  five  children  :  Arthur,  Myrtle.  Mauris,  Clar- 
ence and  Arnold,  all  of  whom  are  at  home. 

Mr.  Heggen  purchased  his  farm  of  one  hundred  and  fifty-two  acres  in 
Oscar  township  in  1898.  He  has  improved  and  developed  the  place  and 
erected  most  of  the  buildings. 

The  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  in  which  they  take 
an  active  interest. 

Mr  Heggen.  besides  owning  his  most  excellent  farm,  is  the  owner  of 
stock  in  the  Farmers  Elevator  Company  at  Rothsay  and  in  the  Farmers 
Telephone  Company.  He  is  a  successful  farmer  and  business  man,  and  one 
of  much  influence  in  his  community. 


TOHN  G.   HAGGSTROM. 


The  present  age  demands  of  men  who  are  to  attain  a  position  of  prom- 
inence in  the  world,  self-reliance,  industry  and  an  unswerving  devotion  to 
duty.  All  of  these  elements  of  character  have  been  exemplified  in  the  life 
of  John  G.  Haggstrom,  who  has  gained  more  than  ordinary  recognition  in 
the  agricultural  field.  He  who  is  the  subject  of  this  sketch  was  born  on 
January  1.  1853.  in  Sweden,  and  is  the  son  of  Gustav  Pearson  and  Mary 
M.  (Greta)  Pearson,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden.  The  parents  of 
John  G  Haggstrom  never  left  their  native  land,  where  they  lived  on  an 
old  homestead,  to  come  to  America  as  most  of  their  neighbors  were  doing 
at  that  time.     They  were  devout  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

John  G.  Haggstrom  came  to  this  country  in  1869,  at  the  aye  of  sixteen 
years.  He  landed  at  Quebec,  Canada,  practically  alone  and  without  friends 
upon  whom  he  could  rely  until  he  was  started  in  the  business  world.  He 
went  first  to  Detroit,  Michigan,  and  then  to  Chicago.  In  Lockport,  Illinois, 
where  tin  subject  of  tin-;  sketch  finally  took  up  his  residence,  he  worked  for 
fourteen  years  in  the  stone  quarries  and  as  a  carpenter  of  that  community. 
The  initial  appearance  of  John  G  Haggstrom  in  Otter  Tail  county  was 
made  in  December,  of  the  year   T882.      ^fter  remaining  ai    Pelican   Rapids 


268  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

four  months  he  moved,  in  1883,  to  the  town  of  Maine,  where  he  bought 
fort)  acres  of  land.  In  [884  he  bought  thirty-two  acres  of  land  and  three 
years  later  added  twenty-seven  acres  to  his  possessions.  In  1900  he  bought 
twenty-seven  acres  and  seven  years  later  added  forty  acres  to  his  farm, 
which  now  extends  over  an  area  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  The  farm 
is  in  an  excellent  state  of  improvement  and  the  owner  continues  to  keep  it 
supplied  with  all  modern  conveniences. 

John  G  Haggstrom  was  twice  married,  first  to  .Mary  Johnson,  the 
daughter  of  Jonas  Johnson,  on  the  27th  of  June,  [882.  To  this  union  were 
horn  Amanda,  who  is  a  nurse  in  Moscow,  Idaho;  five  children  who  died  in 
childhood,  and  one  son,  who  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years.  His  first 
wife  passed  away  on  the  3rd  of  August,  1896.  On  the  4th  of  June.  1898, 
he  was  united  in  matrimony  to  Hannah  Honson,  the  daughter  of  Hans 
Pearson,  a  native  of  Sweden,  who  never  emigrated  to  this  country.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  John  (i.  Haggstrom  have  two  sons,  Conrad  and  Gustaf  Adolph, 
and  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  which  they  attend  regularly,  [n 
political  affairs,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  has  never  taken  a  prominent  part, 
hut  has  been  content  to  devote  his  time  to  his  agricultural  interests.  In 
traveling  over  the  rural  sections  of  the  county,  Mr.  Haggstrom  finds  an 
automobile  an  indispensable  convenience. 


TORKEL  E.  RISBRUDT. 

Torkel  K.  Risbrudt  is  generally  known  throughout  this  section  as  a 
leader  in  public  affairs,  and  as  a  citizen  he  is  highly  respected.  He  is  the 
s.  m  of  Engebret  and  Kari  (Ellefson)  Tarkelson,  both  natives  of  Norway, 
where  his  birth  occurred  on  November  6,  1845.  Engebret  Tarkelson  was 
horn  on  April  _'o.  [825,  and  emigrated  to  America  in  1861.  Immediately 
upon  his  arrival  in  this  country,  he  located  in  Spring  Grove  Houston  county. 
Minnesota,  and  the  following  year  removed  to  Winneshiek  county.  Iowa. 
where  he  remained  until  [867.  lie  then  removed  to  Douglas  count)',  Min- 
nesota where  he  remained  until  May  -'4.  1868,  at  which  time  he  squatted 
mi  land  which  was  nut  surveyed  at  the  time,  located  in  Si  Olaf  township. 
Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  continued  to  reside  on  that  place  until 
his  death,  on  October  ~.  1907.  This  home  was  purchased  under  the  home- 
stead law  and  consisted  of  one  hundred  and  sixt)  acres.  Kari  Ellefson  was 
horn  on  September  24,  1 
count  v.    Iowa- 

Torkel  E.  Risbrudt 
of  his  native  land  and  th 
a  young  man  he  squatte 
Olaf  township,  adjoining  his   father's  farm,  and  paid  ten  dollars   for  his  first 


ind 

died  on  October  4. 

1X0 1.   , 

1  Winneshiek 

ed 

lie  must   of  his  edu 

cation    i 

11    the    Schools 

mil 

s'  attendance  at  the 

schools 

in  Iowa.      As 

one 

hundred   and   sixty 

acres  0 

f    land    in    St. 

OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  269 

sack  of  flour,  which  he  purchased  at  Alexandria,  Minnesota,  and  for  which 
he  borrowed  the  money.  During  the  first  years  of  his  farming  operations 
he  did  teaming  in  connection  with  his  agricultural  work  and  gradually 
added  to  his  holdings  until  he  owned  four  hundred  and  eighty  acres  of 
well-improved  land.  Before  he  began  selling  this  property  to  his  sons  it 
was  devoted  to  general  farming  and  stock  raising. 

Forkel  E.  Risbrudt  has  seen  many  changes  in  this  section,  his  first 
memory  of  Fergus  Falls  being  but  a  lone  log  cabin  in  which  he  spent  the 
night  upon  his  first  tr;p  to  thai  town.  Among  the  many  offices  which  he 
has  held  are  those  of  constable,  assessor,  chairman  of  township  supervisors, 
township  clerk  and  director.  lie  also  served  as  treasurer  of  the  township 
for  sixteen  years.  Politically,  he  votes  independently,  and  his  religious 
affiliations  are  with  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 

On  March  [8.  [873,  Torkel  E.  Risbrudt  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Geuine  Ellfson,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  six  children,  whose  names  fol- 
low :     Edward,  Clara.  Theodore,  Christopher  and  Helena. 


OLE  M.  RUDE. 


Successful  and  prosperous  as  a  farmer,  alter  some  years  of  determined 
and  persevering  effort  to  reach  a  position  of  independence  in  the  agricul- 
tural circles  of  Pelican  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  Ole  M. 
Rude  is  a  man  who  has  shown  his  desirability  as  a  citizen  and  has  demon- 
strated his  possession  of  those  qualities  which,  used  in  matters  of  public 
welfare  and  progress  for  the  community,  have  given  him  a  rank  among  the 
appreciated  men  of  Otter  Tail  county  and   1'elican  township. 

Ole  M.  Rude  was  born  in  Norway.  December  20,  1856.  the  son  of 
Martin  O.  and  Sigeri  (Olson)  Rude,  both  of  whom  spent  their  entire  lives 
in  Norway,  where  Martin  O.  Rude  was  a  man  engaged  in  general  work, 

Ole  M.  Rude,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  was  educated  in  Norway,  after 
which  he  came,  in  the  year  1883,  to  America,  landed  at  Quebec,  Canada,  and 
from  there  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  settling  at  Pelican  Rapids,  near 
where  he  worked  for  some  years  as  a  farm  hand,  engaged  in  clearing  the 
land  of  the  early  settlers  in  Pelican  township.  In  the  year  [88/  Ole  M. 
Rude  bought  fort)  acres  of  land  111  Pelican  township,  a  place  which  he 
cleared  of  timber  and  brush,  and  where  he  erected  the  necessary  buildings, 
on  land  which  as  yet  was  bare  of  any  improvement.  Since  his  first  invest- 
ment, Ole  M.  Rude  has  added  to  his  land  holdings  until  he  now  owns  one 
hundred  acres  of  land  in  Pelican  township,  and  sixty-three  acres  of  valuable 
land  on  the  east  side  of  Pake  Luda.  on  this  land  engaging  in  general  farm- 
ing, together  with  some  stock  raising. 

During  the  year   [884  Ole  M.   Rude  was  married  to  Carrie   Martinson, 


27O  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINNESOTA. 

who  was  born  111  Norway,  the  daughter  of  Martin  Broughten  and  wife,  who 
were  natives  of  Norway.  To  the  marriage  of  Ok  and  Carrie  (Martinson) 
Rude  was  born  one  son,  Martin.  In  the  year  1885  Ole  M.  Rude  was  mar- 
ried, secondly,  t.o  Carrie  Jaeobson,  who  was  a  native  of  Norway,  the  daugh- 
ter nf  Jacob  Haakensen  and  wife,  who  were  among  the  early  comers  to 
Pelican  town-hip.  Ole  M.  and  Carrie  1  Jaeobson)  Rude  are  the  parents  of 
the  following  children:  Jacob,  Simon  Henry,  Minnie,  Amalia,  Carl  Oscar, 
Lawrence  George,  Agnes  Sophie,  Clara  Otthilia  and  Eddie  Norman.  Mr. 
Rude  and  his  family  are  well-known  and  respected  members  of  the  United 
Lutheran  church  of  Pelican  township. 

Politically,  <  Ik  M.  Rude  has  taken  no  especial  part  as  an  office  holder 
or  public  man,  but  has  served  as  a  good  citizen  in  the  ranks,  one  who  is 
known  to  be  willing  to  do  all  in  his  power  for  the  interests  of  his  commun- 
ity. 


ENGEBRET  L.  KVERNSTOEN. 

Engebret  L.  Kvernstoen  is  of  Norwegian  parentage  and  was  born  in 
Norway.  January  24,  [865,  his  parents  being  Lars  O.  and  Ingri  CEmbret- 
datter  1  Kvernstoen,  who  emigrated  to  America  in  the  spring  of  1869.  Upon 
their  arrival  in  the  United  States  they  located  in  Iowa  for  one  year,  and 
then  removed  to  Goodhue  county.  Minnesota.  Their  intentions  were  to 
eventually  establish'  a  home  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  after 
remaining  in  Goodhue  county  for  one  year  they  began  their  journey  to 
Tumuli  township.  Ingri  (  F.mbretdatter)  Kvernstoen  traveling  by  team, 
accompanying  Carl  Steien  and  family,  while  the  hsuband  and  children  jour- 
neyed by  rail  as  far  as  Benson,  where  they  hired  a  team  to  take  them  to. 
Tumuli  township,  where  they  joined  the  mother.  This  was  in  the  spring  of 
1871  and  the}  at  once  entered  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  twenty 
acres,  on  which  Engebret  L.  Kvernstoen  now  lives.  Pars  O.  and  Ingri 
( Embretdatter )  Kvernstoen  remained  on  this  place  until  their  deaths.  Thev 
were  the  parents  of  four  children,  all  of  whom  are  deceased  with  the  excep- 
tion of  Engebrel   !..  Kvernstoen. 

Engebret  P.  Kvernstoen  received  his  meager  education  in  the  district 
schools  of  Tumuli  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  and  after  finishing  same, 
assisted  his  father  with  the  work  on  the  home  place  and  has  always  remained 
on  the  farm.  This  farm  now  consists  of  two  hundred  acres,  eighty  acres 
having  been  added  to  the  original  purchase.  General  farming  is  the  mode 
of  cultivation,  also  some  stock  raising.  The  names  of  the  brother  and  sis- 
ters of  Engebret  P.  Kvernstoen  are  as  follow:     Ole.  Anne  and  Kirsti. 

In  the  fall  oi  [890  Engebrel  L  Kvernstoen  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Ingeborg  Sageng,   and   to   them  have  been  born  nine  children:      Intra,   Ole. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2JI 

Otto  (deceased),  Carl,  Marie,  Laura.  Ottelie.  Ruth  and  Otto.  Engebret  L. 
Kvernstoen  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church. 
The  paternal  grandparents  of  Engebret  L.  Kvernstoen,  Ole  and  Anna 
Kvernstoen,  were  natives  of  Norway  and  lived  and  died  in  that  country,  she 
at  the  advanced  age  of  more  than  ninety  rears. 


LARS  O.  RONNING. 


Lars  O.  Ronning  is  a  highly-respected  citizen  of  Dane  Prairie  township, 
Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota.  He  has  been  very  successful  in  his  chosen 
calling,  and  his  native  ability,  for  honesty  and  worth,  has  won  him  many 
friends.  Lars  O.  Ronning  is  one  of  nine  children  born  to  the  union  of 
Ole  Larson  Ronning  and  Ingeborg  Anderson,  both  natives  of  Norwav.  The 
birth  of  Lars  O.  Ronning  occurred  on  December  31,  1845,  in  Norway, 
where  be  was  reared  to  manhood  and  where  all  but  two  weeks  of  his  educa- 
tion was  received. 

Ole  Larson  Ronning  emigrated  to  America  in  t86~.  and  located  in 
Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  when-  he  rented  a  farm  for  a  period  of  two 
years,  in  the  meantime  sending  for  his  family,  consisting  of  his  wife  and 
nine  children,  who  arrived  in  [868.  They  then  removed  to  Chippewa  county, 
Minnesota,  where  the  father  and  his  son,  Lars  O.  Ronning,  each  entered  a 
claim  or  homestead.  Five  years  later  Ole  Larson  Ronning  sold  his  land  and 
removed  to  Dane  Prairie  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  pur- 
chased a  homestead,  where  both  he  and  his  wife  died.  The  youngest  daugh- 
ter still  resides  on  the  home  place.  The  names  of  their  children  follow  : 
Thor,  Lars  O.,  Anna,  Mettie,  Bertha,  Julia.  Ole,  Christian  and  Sophia. 

Lars  O.  Ronning  is  indebted  to  the  schools  of  his  native  land  for  the 
education  which  he  received.  After  his  arrival  in  this  country  he  attended 
school  for  a  period  of  two  weeks,  but  discontinued  his  studies  for  the  oppor- 
tunity of  accepting  a  position  as  painter  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  where 
he  remained  for  six  years  following  his  trade.  He  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Oleva  Erickson,  while  a  resident  of  Minneapolis,  the  marriage  having 
been  solemnized  in  1S75.  Three  years  later  he  removed  to  Dane  Prairie 
township,  Otter  Tail  count),  and  purchased  eighty  acres  of  homestead  land. 
111  which  he  now  resides.  While  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits  he  has 
followed  his  trade  most  of  the  time  and  is  now  practically  retired  from 
active  labor.  Most  of  the  improvements  on  the  farm  have  been  made  by 
Lars  O.  Ronning,  who  has  developed  the  place  into  a  very  productive  piece 
of  property.  Ilis  wife.  Oleva  (Erickson)  Ronning,  was  born  in  Norway 
and  emigrated,  alone,  to  the  United  States,  her  parents  having  remained  in 
Norway  all  of  their  lives.     To  the  union  of  Lars  O.  Ronning  and  his  wife 


-'7-'  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    .MINNESOTA. 

have  been  born  eight  children:     John,   Severt,   Oleva,   Laura,    Phena,    Ber- 
nard. Allien  and  Mary. 

The  members  of  this  family  are  affiliated  with  the  Norwegian  Lutheran 
church  and  are  actively  engaged  in  the  advancement  and  support  of  same. 
Lars  O.  Ronning  was  elected  to  serve  in  the  capacity  of  supervisor  for 
Dane  F'rairie  township  and  also  as  school  director. 


KNUD  C.  HANSEN. 


\moiig  the  prosperous  financial  institutions  of  Otter  Tail  county  men- 
tion must  be  made  of  the  First  National  Bank,  of  Battle  Lake,  which  is  a 
reorganization  of  the  old  Otter  Tail  County  State  Bank,  and  of  which  Knud 
C.   Hansen  is  the  cashier. 

Knud  C.  Hansen  was  horn  near  Christiana.  Norway,  June  16.  1868, 
a  son  of  Christopher  Hansen  Bye  and  Boel  Skatvedt.  After  his  marriage, 
Mr.  Hansen's  father  dropped  the  "Bye,"  and  used  "Stovern"  in  its  place. 
Both  Mr  Hansen's  parents  were  born  in  Norway  and  spent  their  entire  lives 
in  that  country.  The  elder  Hansen  was  a  farmer  and  reared  a  family  of 
seven  children,  two  of  whom  came  to  America,  Helga,  who  is  unmarried  and 
lives  in  San  Francisco,  California,  and  Knud  C,  the  immediate  subject  of 
this  sketch. 

Knud  C.  Hansen  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  land,  and  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years  came  to  America.  For  seven 
years  he  was  employed  as  clerk  in  a  store  in  Sargent  county.  North  Dakota, 
hut  in  [895  removed  to  Battle  Lake,  this  county,  and  engaged  in  business 
with  T.  A.  Ranstad,  under  the  firm  name  of  Ranstad  &  Hansen,  and  was 
thus  engaged  in  the  hardware  and  implement  business  until  IQ07,  a  period 
of  twelve  years.  In  1^07  Mr.  Hansen  reorganized  the  old  Otter  Tail  County 
State  Bank  into  the  hirst  National  Bank  of  Battle  Lake,  and  was  elected 
cashier  of  the  institution,  a  position   which   he  now   holds. 

The  First  National  Bank  of  Battle  Lake  has  as  its  president.  Charles 
Keith:  vice-president,  Henry  Olson;  cashier,  K.  ( '.  Hansen  and  assistant 
cashier,  F.  J.  Rudh.  A  condensed  statement  from  the  report  made  to  the 
comptroller  of  the  currency  on  .May  1.  11)15.  shows  the  hank  to  have  total 
resources  of  $283,078.17,  divided  as  follows:  Loans.  $213,613.61;  over- 
draft-. $138.02;  United  States  bonds,  $25,000:  banking  house,  $8,000; 
stock  federal  reserve  hank.  SX50.00:  cash  on  hand  and  due  from  hanks. 
$34,226.54;  redemption  fund  with  United  States  treasurer.  $1,250.00.  The 
liabilities  of  the  hank,  which  amount  to  $228,078.  17.  are  divided  as  follows; 
1  apital  stock,  $25,000.00;  surplus,  $3,500.00;  undivided  profits.  $1,263.03; 
circulation,  $25,000.00;  deposits,  $228,315.14.  The  hank  makes  a  specialty 
of   farm  loans  at  the  lowest   rates,  and  all   matters  entrusted   to  that   institu- 


KNTI>  C.   IIANSKX. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  273 

tion  receive  prompt,  careful  and  confidential  attention.  The  bank  is  in  a 
most  prosperous  condition,  due  in  a  large  measure  to  the  efficient  banking 
methods  of  its  officers,  and  the  cordial  relations  between  the  public  and  its 
cashier. 

Knucl  C.  Hansen,  since  coining  to  America,  has  been  identified  with  the 
Republican  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks  and  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  at  Fergus  Falls. 


I<  Ml  AX  A.  MELBY. 


Johan  A.  Melby  is  a  native  of  (  alniar.  Winneshiek  county,  Iowa,  and 
his  birth  occurred  on  February  2.  1869.  He  is  the  son  of  Andrew  Johnson 
and  Martha  ( Osselson  )  Melby.  Andrew  Johnson  Melby  was  born  in  1825, 
in  Ida.  Wermeland,  Sweden,  and  emigrated  to  America  when  a  young  man, 
chosing  Chicago  as  bis  location.  While  a  resident  of  that  city  he  was 
engaged  in  various  occupations,  and  while  there  his  first  marriage  was  sol- 
emnized. During  the  great  struggle  of  the  Civil  War,  Andrew  Johnson 
Melby  was  drafted  for  service,  lint  was  released  because  of  disabilitv.  \bout 
this  time  the  death  of  his  first  wife  occurred,  and  he  returned  to  his  native 
country,  where  he  was  employed  for  a  dredging  concern.  For  eight  years 
he  was  a  resident  of  Norway  and  Sweden,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he 
returned  to  America,  locating  in  Winneshiek  county,  Iowa.  Shortlv  after 
bis  arrival  in  Winneshiek  county  he  rented  land  and  engaged  in  agricul- 
tural pursuits  for  some  years,  also  operating  a  threshing  outfit,  of  which  he 
was  the  owner. 

Andrew  Johnson  Melby  was  united  in  marriage  to'  Martha  Osselson.  a 
native  of  Gran,  Hadland,  Norway,  who  was  born  in  1832.  She  was  a  widow 
and  the  mother  of  one  daughter,  who  died  when  very  young.  To  the  union 
of  Andrew  Johnson  and  Martha  (Osselson)  Melby  were  both  these  chil- 
dren: Johan.  Mary,  now  Mrs.  Guilder  Hanson,  died  in  Grant  county; 
Caroline,  deceased;  Olat.  deceased,  and  Anna,  also  deceased.  In  the  fall  of 
1871  tin-  family  moved  to  St.  Olaf  township.  Otter  Tail  countv,  Minnesota, 
and  purchased  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  located  in  Eagle 
Lake  township.  Their  home  consisted  of  a  "dugout,"  in  which  they  lived 
for  nine  years,  at  the  end  of  which  time  a  log  house  was  erected,  and  is  still 
standing  on  the  original  site. 

Johan  A.  Melby  received  bis  education  in  the  local  schools  of  Eagle 
lake  township,  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  and  has  always  resided  on 
the  home  place,  which  he  now  owns.  General  farming  and  the  breeding  and 
raisin-  of  Shorthorn  cattle  are  the  principal  industries  of  this  farm,  which 
is  well  improved  and  well  managed. 
(1 8b) 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY.    MINN]   501   \ 


MICHAEL  VVALZ. 


Among  the  progressive  and  influential  citizens  of  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  none  are  held  in  greater  esteem  than  Michael  Walz,  who  has 
been  honored  with  many  positions  of  trust.  His  birth  occurred  on  October 
13,  1852,  in  Illinois,  and  lie  is  the  son  of  Michael  and  Eva  (  Schmidt)  Walz, 
both  natives  of  Germany.  They  emigrated  to  America  in  1848  and  located 
in  Illinois,  "/here  Michael  Walz  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits.  In  c86o 
they  removed  to  Stearns  county.  Minnesota,  where  a  farm  was  purchased 
and  this  became  their  home  until  their  deaths.  They  were  the  parents  of 
fifteen  children. 

Michael  Walz  received  his  education  in  St.  John's  College  and  was 
graduated  from  that  institution  in  1868,  after  which  he  taught  school  for 
seven  years  in  Stearns  county,  Minnesota.  He  then  removed  to  Otter  Tail 
county.  Minnesota,  locating  in  the  town  of  1'erham,  where  he  engaged  in  the 
general  mercantile  business.  He  continued  in  this  line  for  nearly  fifteen 
years  and  then  entered  the  banking  business,  organizing  a  private  bank- 
known  as  the  Weber,  Kemper  &  Walz  Hank.  This  bank  was  operated  from 
1890  until  1000,  at  which  time  Michael  Walz  sold  his  interest  in  the  institu- 
tion and  dealt  in  real  estate.  In  1912  he  organized  the  Perham  Holding 
Company  and  became  its  secretary  and  manager,  which  position  be  occu- 
pied until  1915.  He  served  the  public  as  representative  from  1903  until 
1907. 

In  1882  Michael  Walz  was  united  in  marriage  to  Elizabeth  Ries.  and 
they  became  the  parents  of  five  children,  whose  names  follow:  Fred  A.. 
Romeo  P.,  Arthur  R.,  and  Katheryn  M.  and  Antoinett  M.,  who  are  twins. 
Michael  Walz  and  his  wife  are  devout  members  of  the  Catholic  church,  and 
Mr.  Walz  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus. 


EDWARD  L.  JENAL. 

Edward  L.  Jenal  is  one  of  the  representative  citizens  of  the  community 
of  1'erham,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and  his  progressive  ideas  have 
been  of  great  benefit  to  the  citizens.  He  is  the  son  of  J.  P.  and  Katherine 
fGoeden)  Jenal.  and  his  birth  occurred  on  November  3,  1879,  in  Cedar 
county.  Nebraska.  J.  P.  Jenal  is  a  native  of  Switzerland  and  his  wife  is  a 
native  of  Wisconsin.  J.  P.  Jenal  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  Imsincs^  and 
is  located  in  Los    Angeles,  California. 

Edward  L.  Jenal  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Hartington.  Nebraska,  graduating  from  the  high  school  in  that  town.  He 
then  attended  Creighton  University,  of  Omaha.  Nebraska,  upon  the  com- 
pletion of  which  he  entered  St.  Vincent  College,  <>f  Los    \nge1es.  California. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  275 

and  received  his  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  in  1902.  Soon  after  this  he 
became  assistant  cashier  of  the  Pierce  Comity  Bank,  in  Pierce  county. 
Nebraska,  and  occupied  that  position  for  six  years.  He  then  became  assist- 
ant manager  of  the  Chaffee-Miller  Milling  Company,  in  Castleton,  North 
Dakota,  which  position  he  held  for  two  years.  In  191 1  he  became  manager 
of  the  Globe  Milling  Company,  in  Perham,  Minnesota,  and  has  retained 
that  position  until  the  present  time. 

In  1906  Edward  L.  Jena!  was  united  in  marriage  to  Florence  Fay  Hut- 
ton,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  one  child,  Winnefred.  Florence  Fay  (Hut- 
ton  )  Jenzd  is  a  native  of  Pierce,  Nebraska. 

Edward  L.  Jenal  is  a  supporter  of  the  Republican  party  and  very  active 
in  promoting  party  principles.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the 
Catholic  church.  Besides  his  other  interests,  Edward  L.  Jenal  is  financial 
secretary  for  the  Perham  Council  No.  1773,  Knights  of  Columbus,  in  which 
order  he  is  a  member. 


NILS  T.  SKOGLUND. 


Every  successful  business  man,  it  is  said,  leaves  behind  him  a  trail  of 
accretions  to  the  well-to-do  classes.  His  children  start  with  advantages  of 
education,  environment,  easy  command  of  capital.  Their  occupations,  their 
standards  of  living  are  on  a  new  plane.  This  is  what  Mr.  Skoglund  has 
done  for  his  children  and  his  community.  He  has  been  for  twenty  years  a 
resident  of  this  county  and  for  fifteen  years  the  township  treasurer.  Mr. 
Skoglund  was  born  in  Sweden  on  December  1,  1864,  and  is  the  son  of  Jens 
and  Anna  (Jenson)  Jenson. 

Jens  Jenson,  the  paternal  grandfather  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was 
a  farmer  by  occupation.  The  maternal  grandfather  was  a  soldier  in  the 
Danish  War.  The  father  of  Nils  J.  Skoglund,  who  was  a  laboring  man,  is 
still  living  in  his  native  country  of  Sweden,  but  his  wife  has  passed  away. 
They  were  the  parents  of  six  children,  namely:  Sven,  who  lives  in  Sweden; 
Nils  J.,  Peter  and  Anna,  residents  of  the  United  States;  Bengta,  who  lives 
in  Sweden,  and  John,  who  died  in  America. 

After  finishing  his  education  in  his  native  state,  the  subject  of  this 
sketch  did  military  service  for  two  years.  He  then  came  to  America  in 
1 89 1  and  for  the  two  following  years  worked  on  a  railroad  near  Fargo, 
North  Dakota,  which  was  then  his  home.  In  1895  ne  came  to  this  county, 
where  he  purchased  a  farm  which  is  the  site  of  his  present  home.  In  East- 
ern township  he  now  owns  two  hundred  and  forty  acres,  upon  which  he  has 
built  substantial  buildings  and  fences.  He  is  a  well-known  raiser  of  Hol- 
stein  cattle  and  Poland  China  hogs.  Mr.  Skoglund's  present  possessions  are 
an  interesting  contrast  to  his  store  of  worldly  goods  when  he  arrived  on  the 


2/6  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

shores  of  America,  for  at  that  time  he  had  been  obliged  to  borrow  the 
money  with  which  he  bought  his  ticket  which  was  to  bring  him  from  the 
(  lid    World. 

The  marriage  which  made  Air.  Skoglund  and  Elsie  Christiana  Pehrson 
man  and  wife  took  place  in  1803.  The  bride  had  come  to  America  with  her 
parents  when  she  was  a  child,  her  father,  Andrew  Fehrson.  migrated  to 
Fargo,  North  Dakota,  and  after  a  residence  in  that  state  came  to  this 
count}-,  where  he  took  up  the  occupation  of  farming.  The  children  born  in 
this  household  are:     Edwin,  Hilden,  Telia,  Delia,  Rhode  and  Bernard. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Skoglund  are  interested  in  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church, 
of  which  they  are  members.  Mr.  Skoglund  is  now  occupying  the  office  of 
township  trustee,  a  position  which  he  has  filled  with  credit  for  the  past 
fifteen  years.  He  is  interested  in  many  business  enterprises  in  Parkers 
Prairie,  being  vice-president  of  the  Farmers  Equity  Association,  of  which 
he  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  since  its  beginning  a  director.  He  is  also 
a  director  of  the  Joy  Creamery  Company,  located  at  Parkers  Prairie.  He  is 
also  vice-president  of  the  Eastern  Telephone  Company  and  was  one  of  its 
organizers,  and  has  held  the  office  he  now  holds,  namely,  the  vice-presi- 
dency, since  the  beginning  of  the  organization.  The  many  positions  of 
honor  and  trust  which  have  been  held  by  the  above  named  gentleman  classify 
him  as  one  of  the  progressive,  wide-awake  citizens  of  Parkers  Prairie.  His 
life  has  been  no  small  contribution  to  the  general  welfare  of  this  commun- 
ity, who  in  return  give  him  their  respect  and  esteem. 


TENS  CHRIST!  VXSOW 


When  an  ambitious  youth  starts  out  with  no  capital  except  his  health 
and  his  determination  to  succeed  and  middle  age  finds  him  a  representative 
of  his  chosen  line  of  work,  no  better  evidence  is  recpiired  to  show  that  in  the 
beginning  he  possessed  the  necessary  traits  of  character.  Jens  Christianson, 
a  native  of  Sweden,  was  born  there  in  July,  i8f>6. 

Christian  Johnson  and  Anna  Christianson,  parents  of  the  gentleman 
whose  name  appears  above,  were  natives  of  Sweden,  but  came  to  America 
in  r8c)3  to  live  with  their  son.  Tens.  The  father  was  a  working  man  in  the 
old  country.     Here  the)   lived  until  their  death. 

Jens  Christianson,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  went  to  school  in  Sweden 
and  came  to  America  in  December,  [892.  He  journeyed  to  this  township, 
where  he  has  lived  ever  since.  About  a  year  after  his  arrival  he  bought 
eighty  acre-  and  to  this  later  added  forty  acres  more,  and  again  twenty 
acres.  In  1909  he  bought  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  in  section  28,  of 
Eastern  township,  and  later  erected  the  buildings  in  which  he  and  his  family 
have  lived  and  carried  on  their  farm  work. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2~jj 

Jens  Christiansen  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mrs.  Anna  (Skoglund) 
Carlson,  and  to  this  union  five  children  have  been  born,  namely:  Melvin, 
Ruth,  Stella,  Freda  and  Mildred.  Anna  Skoglund  was  first  married  to 
August  Carlson,  to  which  union  were  born  two  children,  William  and  Agnes. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Christianson  are  affiliated  with  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church, 
in  which  they  are  active  and  devout  members. 

Mr.  Christianson,  besides  his  farming  interests,  is  a  stockholder  in  the 
Joy  Creamery  Company.  He  has  been  gifted  with  the  qualities  of  perse- 
verance and  energy  for  which  his  countrymen  are  noted,  and  he  richly 
deserves  the  prosperity  which  has  come  as. a  result  of  his  active,  ambitious 
career. 


WILLIAM  TANGLEN. 


So  sharp  is  modern  competition  that  even  the  man  who  inherits  an 
estate  and  is  able  to  retain  it  is  accredited  rightfully  with  success.  William 
Tanglen,  a  well-known  farmer  of  Parkers  Prairie,  deserves  mention  here 
not  only  as  a  man  who  has  attained  recognition  by  reason  of  his  material 
prosperity,  but  because,  as  a  public  servant,  he  has  been  honorable  and 
upright  in  the  discharge  of  his  duty.  William  Tanglen,  a  native  of  the  farm 
on  which  he  now  lives,  was  born  on  November  26,  1881,  his  parents  being 
John  and  Louise  (Peterson)  Tanglen.  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Sweden. 

The  paternal  grandfather  of  Mr.  Tanglen  was  Peter  Magnus,  who 
lived  and  died  in  Sweden.  The  maternal  grandparents  were  Peter  and  Ellen 
Hawkinson,  the  latter  of  whom  died  in  Sweden,  and  her  husband  came  to 
America  in  1873,  dying  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Louise  Peterson  came  to 
America  in  1871  and  lived  at  Stillwater,  Minnesota.  Her  husband  was 
educated  in  Sweden  and  came  to  the  United  States  about  i860,  locating  in 
Illinois,  where  he  enlisted  in  the  Fifteenth  Regiment,  Illinois  Volunteer 
infantry.  During  the  Civil  War  he  was  wounded  and  was  in  the  hospital, 
but  served  until  the  close  of  the  war. 

John  Tanglen  then  returned  to  Illinois  for  awhile  and  later  came  to 
Stillwater,  where  he  met  and  married  Mrs.  Tanglen.  After  taking  up 
various  occupations,  in  i860  he  began  farming,  homesteading  a  quarter  sec- 
tion, the  farm  on  which  his  son  now  lives,  remaining  there  until  his  death, 
on  June  r<),  1902.  His  widow  still  lives  on  the  farm.  Tt  is  said  that  he  and 
frank  V>.  Saunders  were  the  lirst  settlers  of  this  township.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
John  Tanglen  are  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  of  whom  Minnie,  the  eldest. 
1-  deceased.  The  others  are:  Hilda.  Mary.  Matilda,  Peter,  Anna.  William, 
l.vdia,  Albena.  Josie.  Blanch  and  Walter.  The  parents  belonged  to  the 
Lutheran  church 


278  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

William  Tanglen,  who  has  continued  to  live  on  the  home  place,  has 
been  a  successful  farmer,  to  which  fact  his  well-cultivated  and  modern- 
equipped  farm  as  well  as  his  beautiful  new  home,  will  bear  testimony. 
Although  not  given  to  seeking  public  office  or  honors,  Mr.  Tanglen  has 
served  his  community  in  an  official  capacity,  and  has  also  aided  the  move- 
ments which  in  his  judgment  contributed  to  the  general  good  of  the  com- 
monwealth of  which  he  has  become  a  prominent  factor. 


ANDREW  ANDERSEN. 


As  a  boy  denied  those  things  which  are  part  of  youthful  life  and  with- 
out educational  advantage  or  training;  to  be  thrown  upon  the  world  with 
the  necessity  of  relying  on  one's  resources  and,  regardless  of  this  handicap, 
to  rise  to  a  place  of  prominence  in  the  business  life  of  the  community  and 
to  be  given  a  place  of  note  in  the  public  affairs  of  the  locality  of  his  resi- 
dence is  the  record  of  Andrew  Andersen,  who  is  one  of  the  leading  citizens 
of  Otter  Tail  county  and  of  New  York  Mills. 

Andrew  Andersen  was  born  in  Finland,  February  18,  1854,  the  son  of 
Andrew  and  Mary  Huhtaketa,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Finland,  where 
they  lived  on  one  of  Andrew  Huhtaketa's  farms  during  their  entire  life. 
Andrew  Huhtaketa  and  wife  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  of  whom 
was    Andrew  Andersen,  the  subject  of  this  sketch. 

Andrew  Andersen  had  opportunity  for  attending  school  but  one  day  in 
his  life  and  that  when  about  eighteen  years  of  age,  shortly  after  which  time 
he  came  to  America  and  went  to  the  state  of  Ohio,  where  he  was  employed 
on  a  railroad  for  some  time  and  then  later  he  engaged  in  general  farm  work, 
after  which  he  went  to  Ashtabula.  Ohio,  and  was  there  employed  as  a  dock- 
hand,  until  the  year  [879,  when  he  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
and  bought  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  in  Leaf  Eake 
township,  land  which  as  yet  was  uncleared.  With  a  determination  to  suc- 
ceed, Andrew  Andersen  proceeded  to  clear  his  newly-acquired  land  and  for 
a  home  he  built  a  log  cabin,  one  which  is  in  use  to  tin's  day.  During  the 
year  1898  Mr.  Andersen  bought  eighty  acres  of  land  located  in  the  village 
of  New  York  Mills,  to  which  place  he  moved  and  became  the  agent  for  the 
Monarch  Elevator  Company,  with  which  company  he  was  employed  until 
they  became  a  part  of  the  New  York  Mills  Farmers  Elevator  Company, 
when  he  was  continued  a-  the  agent  of  the  new  proprietors. 

During  the  year  t88i  Andrew  Andersen  was  married  to  Mary  E  Runts, 
win.  was  born  in  Finland,  the  daughter  of  Eric  Runts  and  wife,  who  at  an 
early  date  emigrated  to  America  and  settled  in  Otter  Tail  count)-.  Minne- 
sota. To  the  marriage  of  Andrew  and  Mary  Andersen  were  born  the  fol- 
lowing children:     Emil   A.,  who  i-  manager  of  a  store  at   1  fibbing.   Minne- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2/Q 

sota;  Huldah,  a  school  teacher;  John  L.,  a  farmer  who  lives  on  the  home 
place;  Ida,  who  lives  at  home;  and  Alma,  George,  William,  Vernon,  and 
twi  i  children  who  died  in  infancy. 

Andrew  and  Mary  Andersen  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  at 
New  York  Mills  and  take  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  that  congregation. 
In  politics,  Mr.  Andersen  is  an  ardent  Republican. 

Andrew  Andersen  is  a  man  who  amid  his  personal  business  affairs  has 
found  time  to  work  in  the  interests  of  community  good,  and  for  those  things 
which  have  had  no  small  part  in  the  development  of  the  town  and  the 
county. 


CHRISTIAN  JOHANESEN. 

A  well-known  farmer  and  man  who  has  taken  active  interest  in  the 
affairs  of  Pelican  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  Christian 
Johanesen.  Successful  as  a  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  public  spirited  in  his 
attitude  to  his  community,  and  a  man  of  force  and  personality  so  that  he  has 
become  an  influence  among  his  associates  and  fellow  citizens,  he  is  a  man 
who  has  a  place  among  the  prominent  citizens  of  the  township  and  county. 

Christian  Johanesen  was  born  in  Norway,  October  30,  1859,  the  son 
of  Johanes  Hogenson  and  Martha  Christianson,  who  were  natives  of  Nor- 
way, in  which  country  they  lived  until  the  year  1880,  when  they  came  to 
America,  and  located  in  Pelican  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
where  Johanes  Hogenson  bought  twenty  acres  of  land,  which  he  farmed  for 
the  remainder  of  his  days.  To  the  marriage  of  Johanes  Hogenson  and 
Martha  Christianson  were  born  eight  children.  Agnes,  Hakon,  Christian, 
Mathias,  Karen,  Netta.  Mathia  and  Marie. 

I  hristian  Johanesen  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway, 
after  which  he  became  a  farmer,  later,  in  the  year  1882,  coming  to  America 
and  locating  in  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  bought  a  farm  of 
eighty  acres  of  land,  to  which  he  subsequently  added  until  he  now  has  one 
hundred  and  sixty-six  acres  of  well  improved  and  highly  cultivated  land, 
on  which  he  lives  as  a  farmer  and  stock  raiser. 

During  the  year  1880  Christianson  Johanesen  was  married,  in  Norway, 
to  Marie  Johanesen.  daughter  of  Johanes  Mekelsen  and  Agnets  Haagenson. 
who  came  to  America  with  their  daughter  and  son-in-law  and  at  their  home 
lived   fur  fifteen  years,  after  which  the  elder  Mekelson  and  his  wife  died. 

(hristian  and  Marie  Johanesen  are  the  parents  of  eleven  children, 
Anna,  Edins,  Minna.  Melvin,  Carl,  Hans.  Alvin,  Henry,  Joseph  and  Clara. 
Mr.  fohanesen  and  bis  family  are  active  members  of  the  Norwegian  Luth- 
eran church. 

In   political   or   public   life   ("hristian    Johanesen    has   taken   no   especial 


280  OTTER  TAN.  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA. 

part,  but  has  preferred  to  serve  his  community  as  a  good  citizen  and  as  one 
ready  to  volunteer  his  services  in  those  ways  or  places  where  he  may  be  of 
use  or  benefit.  Mr.  Johanesen  and  his  family  are  well  and  favorably  known 
throughout  the  township,  they  being  people  who  are  highly  respected  and 
esteemed  for  their  part  in  the  life  of  Pelican  township  and  of  Otter  Tail 
county. 


AUGUST  T.  SITZ. 


A  man  of  conspicuous  affiliation  in  business  and  financial  circles  of 
Otter  Tail  county,  one  who  in  public  life  has  served  prominently  and  who 
has  brought  honor  to  his  community  as  a  representative  in  political  associa- 
tion, a  citizen  who  in  the  affairs  of  local  life  has  been  given  a  place  second 
to  none,  the  name  of  August  J.  Sitz  takes  a  leading  place  in  the  record  of 
life  and  event  of  Otter  Tail  county,  and  of  the  town  of  Xew  York  Mills. 

August  J.  Sitz  was  born  in  the  province  of  East  Poland,  near  Schnei- 
demuhl,  Prussia,  Germany,  on  June  _'-|.  1851.  the  son  of  August  and  Doro- 
thy (Utke)  Sitz,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Germany,  there  grew  to 
maturity  and  were  married,  after  which  August  Sitz,  Si\.  took  up  a  position 
as  manager  of  a  large  farm  in  his  native  country,  the  duties  of  which  he 
followed  for  seven  years,  and  as  compensation  for  which  he  received  fifty 
dollars  per  year,  bis  bouse  rent,  the  use  of  one  cow  and  the  wool  from  two 
sheep,  this  product  being  spun  in  the  home.  In  the  year  [853  August  Sitz, 
Sr.,  with  bis  family,  came  to  America  and  went  to  the  city  of  Milwaukee. 
Wisconsin,  where  lie  engaged  for  some  time  in  general  work.  Later  he 
rented  a  farm  in  Milwaukee  county,  which  be  cultivated  for  four  years  and 
•beii  be  moved  to  Monroe  county,  Wisconsin,  and  bought  a  farm  near  the 
town  of  Tomah  and  lived  there  for  about  sixteen  years,  until  bis  death. 
which  occurred  in  the  year  r88o.  Dorothy  Sitz,  bis  wife,  lived  the  remain- 
der of  her  life  with  her  son.  August,  at  New  York  Mills.  Minnesota,  she 
dying  during  the  year  r8o8.  Kugust  and  Dorothy  Sitz  were  devout  mem- 
bers of  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  church.  August  Sitz,  Sr..  was  a  man  of 
Hunt  and  retiring  disposition,  preferring  to  live  as  a  common  citizen,  rather 
than  to  hold  public  office  or  to  take  part  in  those  things  which  would  bring 
him  before  the  public 

To  August  and  Dorothy  Sitz  were  born  three  children:  Louisa,  who 
married  Christopher  Liefke.  and  who  died  near  Tomah.  Wisconsin;  August, 
the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  Augusta,  who  married  ^.ugusl  Spangler.  and 
lives  near  Brainerd,  Minnesota,  where  Mr    Spangler  is  a  moulder. 

August  1-  Sitz.  the  subjeel  of  this  sketch,  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools  of  Tomah,  Wisconsin,  and  following  bis  school  days  be  worked  on  a 
farm   and   then   bought    oul    the   heirs   of   bis    father's    farm    and    lived    there 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  261 

until  the  year  [883,  when  he  came  to  the  state  of  Minnesota  and  settled  at 
New  York  Mills,  near  where  he  worked  one  season  as  foreman  of  a  ditch- 
ing gang  \\h<>  were  employed  on  the  construction  of  the  Northern  Pacific 
railway  in  thai  locality.  Later  in  the  year  August  J.  Sitz  built  a  store  on 
Front  street,  of  the  tow  11  of  New  York  Mills,  where  he  engaged  in  the  sale 
of  implements  and  general  hardware,  at  first  carrying  a  small  stock  and 
later,  with  the  progress  of  his  business,  adding  to  his  line  until,  in  the  year 
1915,  Mr.  Sitz  disposed  of  his  holdings  for  the  sum  of  twelve  thousand 
dollars,  which  was  more  than  five  times  the  value  of  his  original  stock. 
During  his  mercantile  experience,  August  J.  Sitz  was  able  to  see  his  business 
increase  to  the  point  where  he  found  it  necessary  to  erect  a  warehouse  and 
to  enlarge  his  store  room  to  one  having  a  fifty-foot  front.  When  he  dis- 
posed of  his  store.  Mr.  Sitz  was  the  oldest  merchant,  in  poinl  of  continuous 
business,  in  the  town  of  New  York  Mills. 

For  the  past  four  or  five  years  August  }.  Sitz  has  been  the  occupant  of 
the  office  of  vice-president  of  the  First  State  Rank  of  Xew  York  Mills,  at 
the  same  time  serving  his  community  in  several  local  offices,  among  which 
are  those  of  councilman  and  village  president.  During  a  period  of  more 
than  twenty-seven  years  this  worthy  citizen  has  served  his  locality  in  some 
of  the  various  offices  of  honor  and  of  trust,  he  at  the  present  time  being 
treasurer  of  the  township.  In  political  life.  August  J.  Sitz  has  represented 
his  district  at  a  number  of  county  and  state  conventions,  where  he  has  at 
all  times  been  a  credit  to  his  constituents  and  to  his  county.  He  was  county 
commissioner  for  four  years. 

During  the  year  187S  August  J.  Sitz  was  married  to  Sophia  Pankow, 
who  was  horn  at  Watertown,  Wisconsin,  the  daughter  of  the  Rev.  Krdman 
Pankow  and  wife.  The  wife  of  Mr.  Sitz  died  during  the  month  of  March. 
[NXo.  and  on  June  6.  1896,  August  Sitz  was  married,  secondly,  to  Anna 
Pankow,  who  was  a  half-sister  to  the  lir-i   Mrs.  Sitz. 

To  the  marriage  of  August  J.  and  Sophia  Sitz  were  horn  five  children: 
Adolph,  a  lumber  dealer  of  Grand  Rapids,  Minnesota;  Luella,  who  lives  at 
home;  Rufus  B.,  who  lives  at  Duluth,  Minnesota,  where  he  is  assistant 
buyer  for  the  Marshall-Wells  Hardware  Company;  Blandine,  a  school  teacher 
of  Walla  Walla,  Washington,  and  Alexander,  who  is  a  Lutheran  clergyman 
of  Tomahawk.  Wisconsin. 

August  J.  and  Anna  Sitz  are  the  parents  of  three  children:  Arnold,  a 
student  of  the  Lutheran  Seminary,  of  Wauwatosa,  Wisconsin;  Herbert,  a 
student   at    Xew    I'lin.   Minnesota,  and    Krna.  who  lives  at  home. 

August  J.  Sitz  and  his  wife  are  active  and  esteemed  members  of  the 
Lutheran  church  of  Perham.  In  political  affiliation.  Mr.  Sitz  is  a  Republi- 
can. 


282  OTTER    TAT]     COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

L.  H.  D.  SCHMIDT. 

L.  H.  D.  Schmidt  is  a  native  of  Germany  and  was  born  in  that  country 
on  iVovember  :  5.  [86r.  He  is  the  son  of  Deidrich  and  Caroline  (Tearman) 
Schmidt,  also  natives  of  Germany.  Deidrich  Schmidt  was  a  blacksmith  by 
trade  and  followed  that  vocation  until  his  death.  I..  H.  D.  Schmidt  received 
his  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native  land  and  upon  the  completion  of 
same  engaged  in  the  wagon-making  business  until  his  emigration  to  America 
in  r8Sc>.  Upon  his  arrival  in  the  United  States  he  at  once  located  in  Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota,  where  he  again  took  up  his  trade  for  more  than  three 
months,  removing  thence  to  Perham,  (titer  Tail  count}-.  Minnesota.  Imbued 
with  an  independent  spirit,  he  opened  a  wagon-making  shop  and  has  con- 
tinue.! in  that  line  until  the  present  time.  In  [904  he  erected  the  present 
simp,  which  is  eighty  by  eighty  feet  and  two  stories  in  height  at  the  front. 
His  three  sons,  one  other  man  and  himself  are  constantly  employed  in  the 
manufacture  of  wagons. and  bob-sleighs,  completing  about  fifty  of  the  for- 
mer and   from  two  hundred  to  five  hundred  of  the  latter  each  year. 

In  [890  1-.  II.  D.  Schmidt  was  united  in  marriage  to  Emma  Bauck, 
and  tn  them  have  been  born  nine  children,  whose  names  follow:  Dora, 
I. 'aus  !].,  Herman.  Arthur,  Martha.  Luella.  Theodore,  Milton,  Caroline. 
Louis,  Herman  and  Arthur  are  connected  with  their  father  in  the  manufac- 
turing business,  lunma  1  Bauck)  Schmidt  is  a  native  of  Illinois  and  the 
daughter  of  John  Bauck,  a  pioneer  farmer  of  Otter  Tail  county.  Minne- 
sota, win  1  still  lives  i>ii  the  farm  near  Perham. 

1..  H.  1).  Schmidt  and  his  wife  are  both  members  of  the  German  Luth- 
eran church,  and  active  in  church  affairs.  In  politics.  Mr.  Schmidt  is  a 
Republican. 


HENRY  SCHMIDT. 


Henry  Schmidt  is  one  of  ten  children  born  to  the  union  of  Deidrich 
Schmidt  am!  Caroline  Tearman,  both  natives  of  Germany.  Henry  Schmidt 
was  born  mi  June  27,  [866,  in  Germany,  and  is  indebted  to  the  schools  of 
his  native  land  for  the  education  which  lie  received.  Deidrich  Schmidt  was 
a  blacksmith  and  followed  that  vocation  until  his  death,  having  lived  and 
died  m  Germany.     Caroline  (Tearman)   Schmidt  is  still  living. 

I  lenry  Schmidt  was  reared  in  the  land  of  his  nativity  ami  became  a 
blacksmith,  assisting  his  father  in  that  business  until  his  emigration  to 
America,  in  [890.  Upon  his  arrival  in  the  United  States,  Henry  Schmidt 
immediately  proceeded  to  Perham,  Otter  Tail  county,  this  state,  and  engaged 
in  his  former  vocation,  opening  the  blacksmith  business  which  he  has  con- 
tinued until  the  present  time.  In  [906  the  present  building  ■>!'  brick  was 
erected.. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  283 

In  1890  Henry  Schmidt  was  united  in  marriage  to  Dora  Brockman, 
and  to  them  have  been  born  eight  children,  whose  names  follow:  Emma, 
Arnold.  Robert,  Richard,  Edwin,  Walter,  Paul  and  Hilda.  Dora  (Brock- 
man)  Schmidt  is  a  native  of  Germany.  Both  Henry  Schmidt  and  his  wife 
are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  church  and  very  active  in  its  support, 
lie  is  a  respected  citizen  of  the  town  of  Perham,  having  devoted  energy 
and  thought  to  the  solution  of  the  community  problems. 


PER  GUSTAV  MATSON. 

Successful  farmer  and  stock  raiser,  well-known  citizen  of  Otter  Tail 
county,  and  a  man  who  has  had  an  important  part  in  the  development  of 
Pida  township  and  its  resources,  Per  Gustav  Matson,  because  of  his  helpful 
and  useful  life  to  the  community,  has  attained  a  notable  place  among  those 
men,  who  from  the  ranks  of  common  citizenship  as  well  as  in  public  office, 
have  done  no  small  part  to  make  the  locality  an  advanced  and  prosperous 
community. 

Per  Gustav  Matson  was  born  in  Westerbotten,  Sweden,  on  March.  14. 
1867,  the  son  of  Mathias  Olson  and  Maria  Margareta  (Nelson)  Olson,  both 
of  whom  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Sweden,  where  Mathias  Olson  was  a 
farmer  and  landowner.  Mathias  and  Maria  Olson  were  the  parents  of  eigh- 
teen children,  Maria  Matilda,  Bertha  Louisa,  Margareta  Katherine,  Eliza- 
beth Sophia,  Anna  Christina,  Charlotta  Wilhelmina,  Carl  Magnus,  Olaf, 
Eva  Erika.  Nils,  Mathias.  Johan,  Clara  Gustava,  Erik,  Anders  Oscar,  Per 
Gustav,  and  two  other  children  who  died  in  infancy. 

Per  Gustav  Matson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Sweden, 
after  which  he  came,  in  the  year  1802,  to  America  and  located  near  Bertrand, 
Nebraska,  where  he  bought  eighty  acres  of  land  which  he  farmed  until  the 
vear  1900,  and  then  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  bought 
one  hundred  and  thirty-one  acres  of  land  in  Lida  township,  bordering  the 
beautiful  Lake  Lida.  a  few  years  later  adding  forty  more  acres,  a  place 
which  Mr.  Matson  has  greatly  improved  and  where  he  now  lives,  engaged 
in  genera]  agricultural  pursuits. 

During  the  year  1892,  shortl)  before  leaving  bis  home  in  Sweden,  Per 
GustaA  Matson  was  married  to  Marie  b'.llena  Sundleng,  who  was  born  in 
Sweden,  the  daughter  of  Nils  Frederick  and  Charlotta  Johana  (Johnson) 
Sundleng.  Nils  Sundleng  being  a  farmer  in  Sweden,  his  wife.  Charlotta, 
being  deceased.  To  the  marriage  of  Pel'  Gustav  and  Marie  F.llena  Matson 
have  been  bum  twelve  children,  Olga  Maria.  Mma  Wilhelmina,  Amy 
Augusta,  Gustav  Elmer  (deceased),  Edla  Erika,  Victor  Carl  Bernard,  Ver- 
ner  Theodore,  Gustav  W.  Mfml.  Myrtle  Lilian  (deceased),  Emil  Wgoi 
Renhold,  Ethel  Lilian  and  Leonard  Raymond.     Per  Gustav  Matson  and  bis 


284  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

family  arc  active  members  and  workers  in  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church  of 
I  .ida  township. 

Per  Gustav  Matson  has  proved  to  be  one  of  the  best  and  most  desirable 
citizens  of  I. ida  township,  he  being  a  man  who  has  given  much  time  and 
effort  for  the  good  of  the  community,  not  only  during  the  time  when  he 
served  his  township  most  efficiently  as  a  township  supervisor,  but  in  all  mat- 
ters having  for  their  objeel  the  betterment  of  general  conditions  in  the 
county  and  more  especially  i.ida  township. 


\NTON  B.  EVAVOLD. 

Anton  Ij.  Evavold  is  a  native  of  Norway  and  was  born  on  June  6,  1885. 
lie  is  die  s,  m  m("  Glaus  Evavold,  who  emigrated  to  America  from  Norway 
when  Ant' in  J.',.  Evavold  was  a  child  of  three  years.  Anton  B.  Evavold 
received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  and 
has  been  reared  mi  the  home  place,  having  assisted  with  the  cultivation  of 
the  same  until  the  present  time.  He  is  the  sole  owner  and  manager  of  one 
hundred  and  forty  acres  of  well-improved  land,  which  he  devotes  to  general 
farming  and  stuck  raising,  making  a  specialty  of  Shorthorn  cattle. 

In  1912  Anton  E.  Evavold  was  united  in  marriage  to  Minnie  Lang, 
daughter  of  Xels  A.  Lang,  and  a  native  of  Lund  township.  Douglas  county. 
Minnesota.  Anton  B.  Evavold  and  his  wife  are  the  parents  of  one  child, 
Arnold  Wilton  McKay.  They  are  active  members  in  the  Norwegian  Luth- 
eran Free  church  and  lend  their  earnest  support  to  this  denomination.  Anton 
I'..  Evavold  was  appointed  to  act  as  road  supervisor  and  has  served  in  that 
capacit)  tor  a  period  of  two  years,  discharging  the  duties  of  that  office  with 
dispatch  and  efficiency. 


M.  T.  DALY. 


M.  J.  Daly  holds  a  place  of  sincere  regard  in  the  hearts  of  his  fellow 
citizens,  as  is  evidenced  by  the  positions  of  trust  to  which  he  has  been 
elected,  lie  is  the  son  of  M .  F.  and  Mary  (  Malarky  )  Daly,  both  natives  of 
Ireland,  who  emigrated  to  America  in  1847.  'hey  located  in  New  York 
City  until  [856  and  then  removed  to  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  where  M.  F.  Daly 
was  employed  as  a  bookkeeper  Some  years  later  they  removed  to  Carver 
county.  Minnesota,  where  ihe\  both  died.  They  were  the  parents  of  eighl 
children. 

\1.  T.  Daly  was  1,,,,-n  on  March  13.  [861,  in  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  and 
his  education  was  received  in  the  public  schools  of  Minneapolis.  He  was 
graduated  from  the  Iowa  State  University  in  1886,  having  studied  law  in 
thai   institution,  and  immediately  began  10  practice  law    in   Perham,   Minne- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  285 

sota.  During  the  first  seven  years  of  his  practice  he  was  associated  with  a 
Mr.  Baxter,  but  has  since  been  independent  in  his  vocation.  He  is  con- 
nected with  the  First  National  Hank  in  the  capacity  of  vice-president,  and 
served  as  county  attorney  from  1891  until  1899.  He  also  served  as  state 
'senator  from  1899  until  1903.  His  fraternal  affiliations  are  with  the  Bene- 
volent and  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  Relig- 
iously, he  is  a  devout  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church  and  a  member 
of  the  Knights  of  Columbus. 

In  1893  M.  I.  Daly  was  united  in  marriage  to  Emma  Mohr,  and  to 
them  have  been  born  two  children,  whose  names  follow:  M.  J.,  Jr.,  and 
Lenora.  Emma  (Mohr)  Daly  is  a  native  of  Perham,  Minnesota,  and  is 
also  a  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church.  M.  J.  Daly  is  a  member  of 
the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  in  which  order  he  is  held  in  high 
esteem. 


ASBJORN  ASLAKSEN. 


Having  lived  in  this  vicinity  for  twenty-seven  years,  during  which  time 
Asbjorn  Aslaksen  has  become  a  well-known  farmer,  he  has  come  to  be 
considered  one  of  the  substantial  citizens  of  Pelican  township.  Although 
born  in  the  southern  part  of  Norway,  he  has  thoroughly  identified  himself 
with  the  life  of  the  community  in  which  he  has  lived  for  many  years.  His 
birth  took  place  on  March  12,  1869,  but  two  years  later  he  was  left  an 
orphan  by  the  deatli  of  his  father.  Aslak  Asbjornson,  whose  wife.  Ingeborg 
Eliason,  came  to  America  in  [889,  one  year  after  the  subject  of  this  sketch 
settled  in  Pelican  Rapids.  Both  of  Mr.  Aslaksen's  parents  were  born  in 
Norway. 

The  subject  of  this  sketch  was  the  only  child  burn  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Aslaksen.  The  former,  who  served  in  the  Norwegian  army,  became  ser- 
iously ill  during  a  military  drill  ami  for  the  two  years  which  preceded  his 
death,  was  a  helpless  invalid. 

Asbjorn  Aslaksen's  school  days  in  Norway  were  followed  by  a  period 
during  which  he  worked  '>n  his  father's  farm,  and  in  [888,  influenced  by  the 
glowing  reports  of  friends  in  Vmerica,  he  started  out  for  die  new  country 
and  arriving  in  Pelican  Rapids,  worked  as  a  farm  laborer  for  the  following 
two  years.  In  1892  Ik-  became  the  owner  of  one  hundred  and  sj\t\ 
land  !'n  milrs  north  of  Pelican  Kapids  and  to  this  he  added  other  land  until 
he  had  acquired  three  hundred  and  seventy  acres.  This  property  became  his 
home  until  the  fall  of  0110.  when  he  traded  it  for  eighty  acres  in  Pelican 
Kapids.  Flis  present  home  is  a  well-buill  modern  dwelling  Although  living 
in  town   he  still  gives  his  attention  to  grain  farming  and  stock   raising.      In 


286  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

the  latter  branch  of  industry  he  specializes  in  dairy  and  beef  cattle,  of  which 
he  raises  mostly  the  Hereford  breed. 

In  iSijt)  Asbjorn  Aslaksen  was  married  to  Xettie  Johnson,  of  Becker 
county.  Minnesota.  She  came  to  this  count}-  with  her  parents,  who  entered 
a  homestead  claim  near  Cormorant  about  the  year  1875.  Her  father  was 
Xils  Johnson,  a  native  of  Norway.  The  home  life  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Aslak- 
sen was  enhanced  h\  the  adoption  of  two  children  whom  they  took  into  their 
home  and  hearts  as  their  very  own.  The  children  are  Emma  Engel  and 
Arthur  Nygaart. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Vslaksen  are  devoted  members  of  the  United  Lutheran 
church,  of  which  the  former  is  secretary.  He  has  held  the  office  of  secre- 
tary for  fifteen  war-,  both  of  the  church  here  and  at  Grove  Lake.  He  has 
also  been  assessor  of  Scambler  township  and  was  for  eight  years  the  treas- 
urer of  school  district  No.  39.  These  honors  have  been  assumed  by  Mr. 
Aslaksen  without  solicitation  on  his  part,  for  he  has  never  aspired  to  be  an 
office  holder.  Gifted  with  the  ability  to  engage  in  continuous  toil,  and  to 
concentrate  all  of  his  energies  upon  the  task  in  hand,  Mr.  Aslaksen  has 
made  a  success  of  life.  He  occupies  a  prominent  place  in  the  business  and 
religious  life  of  the  community,  while  both  he  and  his  capable  wife  have 
made  many  warm   friendships  here. 


ALBERT  ELLWANGER. 

Albert  Ellwanger  is  a  native  of  Clitherall  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
this  state,  and  his  birth  occurred  on  February  [3,  1874.  He  is  a  brother 
1  if  John  and  Mathias  Ellwanger,  who,  tor  many  years,  owned  the  old  home 
place  together.  ["he  first  agricultural  venture  of  \lbert  Ellwanger  was 
when  the  three  boys,  Albert,  John  and  Mathias,  purchased  the  home  farm 
of  their  father  and,  together,  cultivated  it  for  many  years,  Albert  finally 
selling  his  interest  to  John,  and  Mathias  doing  likewise.  Albert  Ellwanger 
then  rented  a  farm  in  Eagle  Lake  township  for  a  period  of  three  years.  In 
1005  he  purchased  one  hundred  and  thirty-eight  acres  of  land  in  Eagle  Lake 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,  and  has  continued  to  cultivate  this  place  until 
the  present  time,  lie  has  made  all  of  the  improvements  and  put  it  under  a 
line  state  of  cultivation,     lie  has  also  erected  all  of  the  present  buildings. 

[n  1901  Albert  Ellwanger  was  united  in  marriage  to  Oliva  Olson. 
daughter  of  Nels  Olson,  a  native  of  Sweden  and  an  early  pioneer  of  Clith- 
erall township,  and  the\  an-  the  parents  of  seven  children:  Floyd,  Clar- 
ence, NTorris,  Eveline,  Vernie,  Hazel  and  William.  Oliva  (Olson)  Ell- 
wanger is  a  sister  of  Ah  in  Olson,  and  has  been  a  very  material  help  to  her 
husband  in  his  effort  to  Lrain  an  honorable  competency.  They  are  devout 
members  of  the  Norwegian  Lutheran  church  of  Ashby,  Minnesota,  and  are 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  287 

active  workers  for  the  advancement  of  that  denomination.  Albert  Ell- 
wanger  is  a  good  citizen  and  fanner,  and  is  much  liked  by  tbe  people  of  his 
community. 


W.   E.  THOMAS. 

W.  E.  Thomas,  one  of  the  prominent  business  men  of  Otter  Tail  comity. 
was  born  in  Bloomington,  Wisconsin,  January  3.  1856,  and  is  tbe  son  of 
Anson  H.  and  .Martha  (Cooley)  Thomas,  natives  of  New  York.  His  -rand 
father.  John  11.  Thomas,  was  a  native  of  Xew  York,  where  he  lived  until 
he  moved  to  Illinois  in  the  early  forties  and  engaged  in  farming.  He  later 
removed  to  Grant  county,  Wisconsin,  where  he  purchased  a  farm  near  the 
village  of  Bloomington,  and  where  he  died  in  1885.  Anson  H.  Thomas  was 
educated  in  the  common  schools  after  which  he  spent  three  years  in  the  min- 
ing districts  of  California,  having  made  the  trip  overland  to  that  state  with 
an  ox-team  train  ol  gold  seekers  in  1849.  Me  was  moderately  successful  in 
his  mining  ventures,  and  on  returning  to  Wisconsin  he  purchased  an  improved 
farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  and  also  eighty  acres  of  timber  land. 
He  came  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  in  1898,  and  died  there  in  1901,  the 
wife  and  mother  having  died  in  1869.  They  were  the  parents  of  seven 
children:  Lucy  E.,  W.  E.,  Frank  V,  Jesse  E.,  bora  E.,  Linda  E.  and  Mabel 
M.  all  of  whom,  at  this  writing,  are  living. 

W.  E.  Thomas  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Grant  county, 
Wisconsin,  and  in  Pittsfield,  Illinois.  During  bis  early  life  he  was  engaged 
in  farming,  having  been  reared  on  the  farm;  agriculture  has  always  appealed 
to  him.  Me  came  to  Otter  Tail  county  on  October  20,  1878  bringing  with 
him  two  hundred  dollars  in  cash  which  he  had  earned  working  out  In  the 
month  on  a  farm  in  Illinois.  He  located  at  Fergus  Falls,  and  for  a  few 
years  worked  out  by  tbe  month,  then  engaged  in  the  flour  and  ict.-d  business 
in  Fergus  balls,  and  continued  in  that  business  until  1NN7.  when  he  sold  out 
the  business  and  came  to  Maine  township,  and  built  a  water  power  dam  across 
tbe  Red  river,  where  the  little  burg  of  ['helps  has  since  been  built.  He  then 
took  in  a  partner,  E.  1'.  Adams,  and  together  they  built  the  Maine  roller 
mills,  known  far  and  wide  as  tbe  ".Maine  Mills."  They  started  tbe  mill  in 
December.  1889,  and  milled  under  the  firm  name  of  Thomas  Adams  until 
June.  1894,  when  Mr.  Thomas  bought  out  Mr.  Adams'  interest  in  the  prop- 
erty and  has  since  carried  on  the  business  alone.  He  has  built  to  and 
increased  the  capacity  of  the  mill.  Me  has  enjoyed  a  good  trade  and  has 
been   most    successful    in   the  business. 

On  September  7.  1885,  W.  E.  Thomas  was  married  to  Liona  Phelps. 
She  was  a  native  of  New  York,  having  been  born  in  that  state  on  February 
2*,   [860,  being  the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  O.  C.  Phelps.      Her  father  is 


288  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    .MINNESOTA. 

still  living  in  Otter  Tail  count)-.  Her  mother  passed  away  in  December, 
1913.  Mrs.  Thomas  died  on  October  5,  1006.  She  was  a  good  and  true 
helpmate  and  helped  him  to  bear  the  many  burdens  and  hardships  which  he 
encountered  during  the  stringenl  times  while  he  was  building,  starting  in  as 
he  did  with  but  little  cash  or  capital  to  work  on.  Mr.  Thomas  attribute- 
bis  success  to  the  help  and  encouragement  she  gave  him  during  those  trying 
tunes  and  which  she  continued  to  give  throughout  the  rest  of  her  life. 

In  the  summer  of  [908  Mr.  Thomas  tore  out  the  old  dam.  which  had 
begun  to  leak  and  cause  some  trouble,  and  built  in  its  place  a  stone  and  con- 
crete dam,  and  lie  now  has  ,  me  of  the  best  water  powers  on  the  river.  Aside 
from  the  water  power  and  mill  property  Mr.  Thomas  has  four  good  houses 
in  Phelps  which  he  has  built  and  he  owns  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of 
kind  near   Phelps. 

W.  b.  Thomas  was  married,  secondly,  to  Ida  C.  Murk,  January  26, 
iqio.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andrew  Murk,  of  Amor  town- 
ship. 

Mr.  Thomas  is  ;i  member  of  Maine  Camp  No.  41 16,  Modern  Woodmen 
of  America,  and  has  been  venerable  consul  of  that  camp  ever  since  its  organ- 
ization in  1896.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Royal  Neighbors  of  America 
and  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 


ANTON  THOMPSON. 


Anton  Thompson,  a  prosperous  attorney  and  the  present  county  attorney 
of  Otter  Tail  county,  is  a  native  of  this  county,  where  he  was  born  on 
February  8,  1870,  son  of  Bernt  and  Enga  (Goldseath)  Thompson,  natives 
of  Norway  and  farmer-  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  this  county.  Anton 
Thompson  was  reared  on  a  farm  in  Dane  Prairie  township,  and  obtained  bis 
elementary  education  in  the  district  schools  of  the  township. 

When  Mr.  Thompson  was  fifteen  years  old,  he  entered  the  seminary  at 
Wilmar,  Minnesota,  and  was  later  graduated  from  that  institution.  After 
teaching  school  for  five  years  successfully  in  Otter  Tail  county.  Mr.  Thomp- 
son entered  the  University  of  Minnesota  at  Minneapolis,  in  [896,  and  three 
years  later  was  graduated  from  the  law  department  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Laws.  The  year  following  his  graduation,  he  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  his  profession  at  Henning.  Mr.  Thompson  still  retains  his  office 
at  Henning,  although  in  [908  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Clifford  L. 
Hilton,  under  the  firm  name  of  Hilton  &  Thompson,  and  lias  since  been 
in  the  practice  of  law  at   Fergus  Falls. 

Having  been  elected  as  county  attorney  of  Otter  Tail  county  in  1908, 
Mr.  Thompson  has  held  the  office  continuously  for  the  past  seven  years. 
He  has  proved  to  be  a  very  capable  and  trustworthy  counselor  of  the  law 


ANTON   THOMPSON 


OTTER     JAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  28g 

and  is  well  versed  in  the  decisions  of  all  courts  as  well  as  the  great  body  of 
common  law,  upon  which  our  present  statutory  law  is  based. 

In  1897  Anton  Thompson  was  married  to  Ragnhild  Vinje,  daughter 
of  Olof  O.  Vinje,  of  the  town  of  St.  Olaf,  this  county,  and  to  this  union 
seven  children  have  been  born,  Marion  B.,  Harriet  G.,  Frances  V.,  Innis 
M.,  Owen  V.,  Anton  R.  and  Helen  M. 

Air.  Thompson  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  of 
the  Hlks  and  of  the  Sons  of  Norway.  He  and  his  family  are  members  of 
the  Lutheran  church. 


AMOS  MARCKEL. 


Amos  Marckel  is  a  representative  citizen  in  the  commercial  and  civic 
circles  of  his  community  and  has  always  been  interested  in  the  progress  of 
the  town  and  county.  He  is  the  son  of  John  L.  and  Maria  Marckel,  and 
his  birth  occurred  on  June  11,  1862,  in  Columbiana,  Ohio.  John  L.  Marckel 
was  a  farmer,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  died  when  Amos  Marckel  was  a  very 
young  child. 

After  completing  his  education,  which  was  received  in  the  common 
schools  of  Columbiana,  Ohio,  he  entered  the  services  of  a  hardware  con- 
cern, as  a  clerk,  and  remained  in  their  employ  for  a  period  of  five  years. 
In  1886  he  removed  to  the  town  of  Perham,  Minnesota,  and  engaged  in  the 
hardware  and  implement  business  independently.  The  first  store  was  located 
just  three  doors  west  of  his  present  location  and  the  business  was  pur- 
chased from  A.  E.  Luedke.  In  1895  he  purchased  the  present  site,  con- 
taining an  excellent  brick  structure.  He  has  engaged  in  the  lumber  and 
automobile  business  in  connection  with  his  hardware  and  implement  busi- 
ness, all  of  which  he  operated  individually  until  1914,  when  he  incorporated 
the  entire  enterprise  as  The  Marckel  Company.  His  employees  became  the 
stockholders  and  he  was  elected  as  president.  In  1906  a  partnership  was 
formed  with  A.  II.  llaut.  and  a  business  opened  in  Gackle,  North  Dakota. 
known  as  Haut  &  Marckel.  They  operate  a  store,  similar  to  The  Marckel 
Company,  lie  also  is  the  owner  of  a  farm  near  Dead  Lake,  Minnesota,  on 
which  he  breeds  purebred  Guernsey  cattle.  In  1913  he  assisted  in  the 
organization  of  the  Hall  Hardware  Company,  of  Minneapolis.  Minnesota, 
and  is  vice-president  and  director  of  same.  This  company  is  engaged  in  the 
wholesale  hardware  business. 

In  [888  Amos  Marckel  was  united  in  marriage  to  Emma  C.  Coblentz, 
ami  they  are  the  parents  of  one  child.  George  E.,  who  is  now  a  student  in 

the  high   scl 1   in    Perham.      Emma   C.    (Coblentz)    Marckel    is   a   native  of 

Columbiana,   Ohio.      Both    husband   and   wife   are   members   of    tlu    Grace 

-   K/b! 


29O  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Reformed  church.  The  lodge  affiliations  of  Amos  Marckel  are  with  the 
Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  and  his  membership  consists  of  rela- 
tions with  the  blue  lodge  of  Perham,  the  chapter  in  Detroit,  the  command- 
cry  in  Wadena,  and  the  Shrine  in  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  He  has  served  his 
community  as  mayor  and  village  recorder. 


osCAR  YOUNG. 


The  memory  of  the  late  <  )scar  Young  long  will  be  cherished  in  Amor 
township,  this  county,  where  for  years  he  labored  for  the  advancement  of 
material  conditions  thereabout.  Arriving  in  Otter  Tail  county  in  1870,  as  the 
live-year-old  son  of  a  homesteader,  Oscar  Young  became  one  of  the  most 
forceful  citizens  of  Amor  township,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death,  on  Febru- 
ary 14,  1906.  he  was  the  owner  of  a  fine  farm  of  four  hundred  acres,  which 
he  bad  helped  to  claim  from  the  forest  wilderness. 

Oscar  Young  was  born  in  Sweden  on  November  15,  1865,  son  of  John 
N.  Young,  a  Swedisli  farmer  and  carpenter,  who  came  to  America  during 
the  early  childhood  of  Oscar,  and  after  working  on  the  railroad  at  that  time 
being  constructed  in  this  region,  entered  a  homestead  claim  in  Amor  town- 
ship, this  county,  and  there  made  bis  home.  That  was  in  the  year  1870, 
Oscar  Young  being  at  that  time  but  five  years  of  age,  and  be  retained  a 
distinct  menmn  of  being  carried  a  long  distance  on  his  father's  back  during 
the  wearisome  trip  to  this  county  from  the  nearest  railroad  point.  John  N. 
Young  and  Solomon  Larson  were  homesteaders  together,  and  during  the 
time  they  were  "prooving  up"  they  lived  in  the  same  humble  dwelling. 

Reared  on  the  homestead  farm.  Oscar  Young  grew  up  amid  all  the 
hardships  attendant  upon  pioneer  living,  receiving  such  meager  education 
as  was  afforded  in  the  primitive  schools  of  that  day.  his  schooling  having 
been  obtained  in  district  No.  69,  and  here  be  was  a  farmer  all  his  life.  \  fter 
his  marriage,  in  1890,  lie  moved  to  the  farm  in  Amor  township,  where  the 
rest  of  his  life  was  spent,  and  which  he  greatly  improved  during  his  occu- 
pancy. In  1X07  he  built  a  commodious  harn  and  in  1  Sou  erected  the  com- 
fortable dwelling  in  which  his  widow  and  children  are  now  living.  As  he 
prospered  in  bis  agricultural  ventures  he  added  to  his  farm  by  additional 
purchase  from  time  to  time,  until  be  became  the  owner  of  a  farm  of  four 
hundred  acres.  In  addition  to  his  extensive  farming  interests.  Mr.  Young 
found  time  to  engage  actively  in  civic  affairs  and  for  a  time  was  a  member 
of  the  town  hoard,  being  regarded  as  one  of  the  influential  men  in  that  sec- 
tion of  the  county. 

On  May  24,  [890,  Oscar  Young  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mary 
Bjorgaard,  who  was  born  in  Norway  on  May  10.  1866,  daughter  of  John 
and  Sophia  (  Erickson)    Bjorgaard,  and  to  this  union  six  children  were  horn, 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  29I 

Mabel,  John.  Leonard,  Donald,  Alphild  and  Edna,  all  of  whom  are  living  at 
home,  aiding  their  widowed  mother  in  the  management  of  the  farm  and  are 
making  a  fine  success  of  their  labors.  Mrs.  Young  came  to  America  alone 
in  1882,  proceeding  at  once  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  she  joined  her 
brothers,  Christian  and  Oliver,  who  had  come  here  some  years  before.  In 
1883  Mrs.  Young's  parents  came  to  this  county  from  Norway,  bringing 
with  them  the  other  children  of  the  family,  John,  Oscar  and  Emelie.  The 
Bjorgaards,  as  were  the  Youngs,  were  members  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran 
church  and  all  these  children,  as  were  the  children  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Young, 
were  reared  in  the  faith  of  that  church. 

The  late  Oscar  Young  was  devoted  to  his  family,  and  his  death,  in 
1906,  was  a  great  loss  to  his  loving  wife  and  family  of  young  children,  as 
well  as  to  the  whole  community,  for  he  was  a  man  who  was  doing  well  his 
part  in  the  community  in  which  he  had  established  so  excellent  a  home  and 
he  will  not  soon  be  forgotten  there. 


ANDREW  G.  MURK. 


When  Andrew-  G.  Murk,  now  one  of  the  most  substantial  farmers,  as 
well  as  one  of  the  best-known  citizens  of  Amor  township,  this  county, 
arrived  in  Otter  Tail  county,  he  bought  a  quarter  of  a  section  of  land, 
paying  for  the  same  five  dollars  an  acre.  He  proceeded  to  improve  the 
same  and  cultivated  it  with  such  profit  that  he  presently  was  able  to  enlarge 
his  holdings,  until  now  he  is  the  owner  of  five  hundred  and  eighty  acres  of 
fine  land,  the  most  of  which  is  under  excellent  cultivation. 

Andrew  G.  Murk  was  born  in  the  kingdom  of  Sweden,  July  13,  1856, 
youngest  son  of  Gabriel  and  Magdalena  (Carlson)  Murk,  who  were  the 
parents  of  six  children,  those  besides  the  subject  of  this  sketch  being  Albert- 
ina,  Matilda.  Oscar.  Frank  and  John.  Albertina  and  John  are  deceased. 
Gabriel  Murk  was  born  on  January  20,  1813.  For  twenty-nine  years  he 
served  his  king  as  a  soldier  and  was  a  participant  in  the  arduous  campaign 
which  marked  the  war  between  Germany  and  Denmark  years  ago,  and  in 
[879  came  to  America.  his  last  days  being  spent  in  the  home  of  his  son. 
Andrew,  in  this  county. 

In  October,  18S7.  Andrew  C.  Murk  was  united  in  marriage  to  Clara 
Josephine  Gustafson,  who  also  was  born  in  Sweden,  and  to  this  union  four- 
teen children  have  been  born.  Oscar,  Anna,  Ida,  Hanna,  Beda,  Amanda, 
Hulda,  Gilbert,  Emily,  Arvid.  Harold,  Rolla.  Carl  and  Clara.  Oscar  and 
Hanna  are  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Murk  are  members  of  the  Swedish 
Lutheran  church  and  their  children  have  been  raised  in  the  faith  of  that 
church,  the   family  being  held  in  high  esteem  throughout  the  entire  neighbor- 


2()>  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

hood.      Mr.   Murk    for  years   has  taken  an  active   part   in   public  affairs   in 
Amor  township  and  for  fifteen  years  was  treasurer  of  the  school  board. 

As  noted  above.  Andrew  G.  Murk's  start  as  a  farmer  in  this  county 
was  on  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  for  which  he  paid  five  dollars 
an  acre.  Since  then  he  lias  increased  his  farm  holdings  until  now  he  owns 
nearly  six  hundred  acres  of  fine  land,  most  of  the  improvements  on  which 
he  has  made  himself,  lie  having  built  the  house  and  barn  and  numerous 
other  substantial  improvements.  In  addition  to  his  general  farming.  .Mr. 
.Murk  gives  considerable  attention  to  the  raising  of  live  stock,  his  Shorthorn 
cattle  and  Shropshire  sheep  showing  an  excellent  strain.  He  is  a  good 
citizen  and  has  many  friends  in  Otter  Tail  county,  all  of  whom  hold  him 
in  the  highest  regard. 


HERMAN  GREFE. 


Herman  Grefe,  born  near  Hanover,  Germany,  January  4.  1866,  is  one 
of  the  successful  farmers  of  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota.  Herman  Grefe, 
the  father  of  the  subject  of  tlii-.  -ketch,  was  born  in  Hanover,  Germany, 
May  [7,  183 1.  Herman  Grefe,  Sr.,  was  married  to  Mary  Clasen,  who  was 
born  near  Hanover,  February  24,  [836,  and  died  in  August,  [889.  The 
senior  Herman  Grefe  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  his 
native  land.  He  never  came  to  America  and  on  the  completion  of  his  school 
work  engaged  in  farming  on  the  farm  that  bis  father  had  owned.  The  farm 
had  been  in  the  possession  of  the  Grefe  family  for  over  two  hundred  years. 
Herman  Grefe,  Sr..  was  the  father  of  the  following  children:  Loise,  Her- 
man, Henry,  Hick  and  William.  Louise  and  William  remained  in  Ger- 
many; Henry,  deceased,  came  to  America  in  [882;  Dick  came  to  America  in 
i88(),  direct  to  Otter  Tail  county,  and  Herman  came  to  America  in  the  year 
1887.  William  is  an  officer  in  the  German  army  at  the  present  time.  He 
has  seen  active  service,  and  has  been  returned  home   for  surgical  treatment. 

John  Henry  Grefe,  the  father  of  Herman  Grefe,  Sr.,  was  born  in  [802 
and  died  in  1877.  He  was  an  extensive  landowner  and  a  prosperous  farmer 
in  the  community  in  which  he  lived.  John  Henry  Grefe  was  an  active  and 
respected  member  of  the  German  Lutheran  church. 

Herman  Grefe,  on  bis  arrival  in  America  in  1NN7.  first  worked  in  Kan- 
sas and  later,  in  1805  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  has 
since  resided,  with  the  exception  of  a  short  visit  to  bis  native  land.  On  his 
return  to  the  United  Slates  he  came  direct  to  Otter  Tail  county,  where  be 
bought  a  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  in  Otter  Tail  township,  sections  10  and 
11.  lie  has  added  to  Ins  first  purchase  until  be  now  lias  a  well-improved 
farm  of  three  hundred  acres. 

Herman  Grefe  married   Sophia   Misegades,  a  native  of   Hanover,  Ger- 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  293 

niaii\-,  in  May,  [896.  Mrs.  I  irefe  was  bom  in  1876  and  came  to  this  country 
early  in  life.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  (irefe  are  the  parents  of  the  following  children: 
Katherine,  Herman  D.,  Rebecca,  William  and  Lorine. 

Herman  <  irefe  and  his  wife  have  devoted  much  time  and  energy  to  the 
development  of  their  farm.  It  was  for  the  most  part  a  wilderness  of  wild 
and  undeveloped  land  when  purchased  by  them,  but  by  constant  and  patient 
labor  they  have  seen  their  rough  acres  develop  into  a  valuable  tract.  In  the 
early  part  of  their  married  life  they  built  a  new  house  and  from  time  to  time 
have  added  many  substantial  improvements,  in  the  nature  of  outbuildings. 
barn  and  the  telephone. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Grefe  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  church  and 
take  an  active  part  in  the  services.  Mr.  Grefe  is  active  in  the  affairs  of  the 
community,  being  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Farmers  Society  of  Equity, 
he  is  secretary  of  the  creamery  that  was  established  in  1905  with  but  forty 
patrons  and  under  his  wise  and  careful  management  the)'  now  have  one  hun- 
dred and  thirty  patrons.  In  1015  the  creamery  paid  out  for  butter  fat  to 
the  fanners  more  than  thirty-seven  thousand  dollars  The  Farmers  Society 
of  Equity  is  an  organization  of  farmers  for  the  purpose  of  buying  and  sell- 
ing. They  devote  most  of  their  energy  to  shipping  and  selling  of  stock 
During  the  past  year  more  than  thirty-nine  thousand  dollars  worth  of  live 
-tuck  has  been  shipped  and  sold  by  this  organization.  This  society  has 
handled  in  11)15.  more  than  forty-eight  thousand  dollars  for  farmers  around 
1  )tter  Tail. 


LEONARD  JOHNSON. 


Among  the  successful  farmers  of  Compton  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  is  Leonard  Johnson,  who  owns  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  in 
this  township. 

.Mr.  Johnson  is  a  native  of  Sweden,  where  he  was  born  on  June  _'.  1 S ^ - 
His  parents  were  John  Anderson  and  Inga  Lisa  Magnuson,  wdio  were  also 
natives  of  Sweden.  Mr.  Johnson's  paternal  grandfather  was  Andrew  Ander- 
son, a  native  of  Sweden  and  a  farmer  in  the  old  country.  Tie  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Lutheran  church. 

John  Anderson,  the  father  of  Leonard  Johnson,  received  military  train- 
ing in  his  native  country,  but  farmed  practically  all  of  his  life.  For  eleven 
years  he  was  the  overseer  of  a  large  tract  of  land.  He  died  on  November 
29,  [899,  and  his  wife  in  June,  [903.  They  were  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  and  the  parents  of  six  children,  of  whom  \ndrew  is  deceased.  Two 
of  the  children,  Leonard,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  and  Gustav.  came  to 
America.  The  other  children,  John  Gustaf,  August  and  Matilda  O.  live 
in  Sweden. 


294  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Leonard  Johnson  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  land. 
He  came  to  America  shortly  after  bis  marriage  on  February  18,  1881.  Mr. 
Johnson  was  accompanied  to  America  by  his  wife.  They  landed  in  New 
York  City  on  April  24.  1881,  and  came  directly  to  Otter  Tail  county,  Minne- 
sota. Mr.  Johnson  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land  in  section  19,  of  Comp- 
ton  township.  After  living  on  the  farm  for  twenty-one  years,  he  has  gradu- 
ally increased  its  acreage  until  he  now  owns  two  hundred  and  forty  acres. 
He  paid  six  dollars  and  seventy-five  cents  an  acre  for  the  original  tract  of 
eighty  acres,  which  consisted  of  wild  land.  Later  he  paid  two  thousand 
dollars  for  eighty  acres  which  he  purchased  from  his  brother  in  1899.  He 
moved  to  the  second  farm  two  years  later. 

To  the  marriage  of  Leonard  Johnson  and  Mary  Anderson,  there  have 
been  born  eight  children,  all  of  whom  are  living,  Allilda  O..  Emma  M., 
Selma  J.,  John  I...  Gustav  A.,  Hulda  E..  Alma  W.  and  Oscar  W. 

In  1 9 1 3  Mr.  Johnson  rebuilt  his  residence  and  in  1905  built  a  new  barn. 
Leonard  Johnson  not  only  carries  on  general  and  mixed  farming,  but  has 
made  a  specialty  of  stock  raising,  and  has  been  very  successful.  Mr.  and 
Airs.  Johnson  and  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  in  Compton 
township. 


ANDERS  T.  NOREEN. 


\nders  J.  Noreen,  the  proprietor  of  one  hundred  and  eighty-five  acres 
of  good  farming  land  in  Compton  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota, 
was  born  on  June  11.  1861,  in  Sweden,  and  is  the  son  of  Jons  Jansson  and 
Margaret  Anderson,  who  were  also  natives  of  Sweden.  Mr.  Noreen's 
grandfather,  Jan  Anderson,  was  also  a  native  of  Sweden  and  a  farmer  by 
occupation.  He  owned  a  small  farm  in  his  native  land.  He  and  his  wife 
were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

Mi-.  Noreen's  father,  Jons  Jansson,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  land  and  spent  all  of  his  life  in  Sweden.  When  a  young  man 
In-  received  the  customary  military  training.  In  hi?  native  land  his  name 
was  written  Trap])  Jons  Jansson.  He  died  in  September,  1005.  and  his  wife 
in  November,  1007.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  of  whom  two, 
Nels  and  Vnders  I.,  came  to  America.  Karin.  the  second  child.  L  deceased. 
rin-  eldest  child,  Trapp  Jons  Jansson,  lives  in  Sweden. 

Anders  J.  Moreen  was  educated  in  Sweden  and.  after  finishing  his  edu- 
cation, came  to  America.  Me  landed  in  New  York  City  on  Ma\  26,  1882. 
and  immediately  thereafter  proceeded  to  [owa,  where  he  remained  for  two 
month'-.  He  then  came  to  Otter  Tail  county,  \linne^>i.i.  and  For  two  years 
,  upon  neighboring  farms.  \(  the  end  of  two  years  Mr.  Noreen  was 
able  to  purchase  sixty-five  acres  of  land  in  section  2t.  of  Compton  township. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  2<)Z, 

He  has  added  to  this  original  farm  until  he  now  has  one  hundred  and  eighty- 
five  acres.  In  1886  Mr.  Xoreen  built  his  first  house.  His  original  farm 
was  purchased  from  the  railroad  company  and  most  of  it  has  been  cleared 
at  the  present  time.  Mr.  Noreen  has  live  stock  on  the  farm  and  has  been 
successful,  measured  by  the  standard  of  the  community  in  which  he  lives. 

In  1886  Anders  J.  Noreen  was  married  to  Anna  Johnson,  a  native  of 
Sweden,  and  to  them  have  been  horn  six  children,  all  of  whom  are  living  and 
are  unmarried.  The  names  of  the  children  in  the  order  of  their  births  are 
as  follow  :  Fred  William.  George  Henry,  Ruth  Emelia,  Elsie  Josephine, 
Ellen  Augusta  and  Sophia  Magdeline. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Anders  J.  Noreen  and  family  are  members  of  the  Mission 
church  and  are  active  in  church  work.  Mr.  Noreen  is  chairman  of  the  town 
board  and  has  served  as  chairman  for  six  years.  He  is  a  prominent  citizen 
of  Compton  township  and  a  man  who  wields  a  tremendous  influence  in 
behalf  of  worthy  public  enterprises. 


VERNON  STEDMAN  BEMUS. 

Vernon  S.  Bemus,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Compton  township,  Otter 
Tail  county,  Minnesota,  who  owns  a  most  attractive  farm  in  the  community 
where  he  lives  and  whose  buildings  are  all  practically  new,  both  the  house 
and  barn  having  been  erected  in  1914,  is  a  native  of  Dodge  count v,  Minne- 
sota, horn  on  October  22.  i860. 

Mr.  Bemus  is  the  son  of  William  and  Elizabeth  (Stedman)  Bemus, 
natives  of  Clay  county.  New  York,  and  Virginia,  respectively.  Mr.  Bemus's 
father  died  in  1901  at  the  age  of  eighty-one.  The  father  of  William  Bemus 
was  a  native  of  England,  who,  during  the  later  years  of  his  life,  immigrated 
to  America  and  settled  in  New  York  state.  The  Bemus  family  were  farm- 
ers by  occupation  and  attended  the  Methodist  church. 

The  late  William  1  Senilis  was  a  carpenter  and  contractor  until  i860, 
when  he  moved  to  Dodge  county,  Minnesota.  After  working  at  his  trade 
in  Dodge  county  for  one  and  one-half  years,  he  took  a  homestead  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Dodge  count}-  and  lived  upon  this  farm  until  his 
death.  He  attended  the  Methodist  church.  His  wife  died  in  April,  1008. 
The\'  were  the  parents  of  nine  children,  all  of  whom  are  living,  George  \\'., 
Cora,  Luella  May.  Vernon  S.,  Frank  E.,  Florence  F..,  Henry  ('.,  Eva  and 
\lva    V 

Vernon  S.  Bemus  received  a  good  common-school  education  in  the  pub- 
lic schools  of  Dodge  county,  Minnesota.  After  his  first  marriage,  Mr. 
Remus  lived  in  Dodge  county,  Minnesota,  for  nine  years,  renting  land  for 
a  time.  Finally,  he  purchased  two  hundred  acres,  which  he  sold  when  he 
came  to  Otter  Tail  county  on  March  1.   [912.      At  tin'-;  time  Mr.  Bemus  pur- 


2f)6  0TTEK    TAII     COUNTY,     MINNESOTA. 

chased  two  hundred  and  forty  acres,  but  sold  it  in  the  fall  of  1914  and  pur- 
chased one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  the  farm  where  lie  now  lives  and 
eighty  acres  for  his  son,  Harold.  The  barn  on  Mr.  Bemus's  place,  which 
he  erected  in  11)14,  's  thirty-two  by  sixty  feet.  Mr.  Bemus  is  one  of  the 
enterprising  farmers  of  this  section,  and  is  one  of  the  foremost  stock  raisers 
of  Otter  Tail  comity,  where  he  owns  and  operates  "Fair  View  Stock  Farm," 
situated  two  miles  east  of  the  town  of  Deer  Creek. 

Vernon  S.  Bemus  has  been  twice  married.  He  was  first  married  on 
December  i,  [881,  to  Carrie  May  Baldwin,  who  died  on  February  14,  1890. 
By  this  marriage,  there  was  born  one  son.  Percy  \Y.  Mr.  Bemus  was  mar- 
ried, secondly,  on  November  18,  [892,  to  Emma  Leibold,  and  to  them  has 
been  born  one  child,  Harold  Earl,  who  married  Mildred  Arbuckle  and  lives 
in  Otter  Tail  county. 

Mr.  Bemus  is  among  the  leading  farmers  and  stockmen  of  Otter  Tail 
county  and  is  popular  in  the  community  where  he  lives. 


ANDY  VEDEN. 


Andy  Veden,  who  owns  two  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  line  farming 
land,  all  of  which  is  well  improved  and  which  is  situated  in  Compton  town- 
ship, and  who  is  the  president  of  the  Deer  ("reek  Co-operative  Shipping 
Association,  which  did  a  business  amounting  to  ninety-six  hundred  dollars 
in  1914,  is  a  native  of  Otter  Tail  county,  born  here  <>n  November  6.   1874. 

Mr.  Veden  is  the  son  of  Charles  and  Caroline  (Johnson)  Veden,  both 
of  whom  were  born  in  Sweden,  the  former  in  1833.  Charles  Veden  came 
to  America  before  his  marriage.  He  located  in  Chisago  count}-.  Minnesota, 
where  he  owned  eight)'  acres  of  land.  Some  time  after  the  Civil  War  he 
sold  the  farm  and  moved  to  Parkers  prairie.  Otter  Tail  county,  pre-empting 
oik-  hundred  and  -i\tv  acres  of  land  at  Horse  Head  lake.  He  lived  on  this 
farm  until  !<^7/.  when  he  sold  out  and  came  to  Compton  township.  Here 
he  pre-empted  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  section  4.  and  here 
lived  until  his  death,  lie  served  three  years  in  the  Civil  War,  as  a  private 
in  the  Third  Regiment.  Minnesota  Volunteer  Infantry.  Mr.  Veden's  father 
was  a  member  of  die  Lutheran  church  and  one  of  the  organizers  of  the 
church  in  Compton  township.  He  served  as  constable  of  his  township  for 
twenty-six  years.  He  died  in  November,  1913,  and  his  wife  in  June,  1914. 
They  were  the  parents  of  seven  children,  two  of  whom.  Theresa  and  Corena, 
are  deceased.     The  living  children  are   Mtora,  John,  Andy,  Elot  and  Herbert. 

Andy  Veden  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Compton  township 
and  has  been  engaged  in  fanning  all  of  his  life.  He  has  lived  on  the  farm, 
which  he  now  occupies,  for  twenty  years.  In  the  beginning  Mr  Veden  pur- 
chased one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  most  of  which  was  wild  prairie. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  _><)- 

He  now  owns  two  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  all  of  which  is  in  one  body. 
In   i<)i.-,  -Mr.  Veden  built  a  splendid  house  and  in  1907  a  large  barn. 

On  June  24,  [895,  Andy  \  eden  was  married  to  Charlotte  Lngwald,  who 
was  born  in  Sweden  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Swan  lngwald.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Veden  have  seven  children,  all  of  whom  are  at  home.  Eleonora,  Delia. 
Clarence.   Lilly,  Charles,   Mable,  and   Donald. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andy  Veden  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and 
take  an  active  interest  in  church  work.  Mr.  Veden  served  fifteen  years  as 
constable  of  Compton  township,  but  is  no  longer  filling  this  position.  He 
also  served  as  assessor  of  Compton  township  for  seven  years  and  served 
seven  years  as  clerk  of  school  district   No.  94. 


vNDREW  A.   PETERSON. 

Andrew  V  Peterson,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Eagle  Lake  town-hip. 
()ner  Tail  county.  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Sweden,  September  6,  [860,  the 
son  of  Andrew  and  Cagse  Peterson,  who  were  also  natives  of  Sweden.  Mr. 
Peterson's  father  was  a  farmer  in  his  native  land  and  was  engaged  in  agri- 
cultural pursuits  until  he  came  to  America  in  1S67.  During  the  first  two 
and  one-half  years  of  his  residence  in  America,  he  was  employed  in  the 
copper  mines  of  Michigan.  Subsequently,  he  immigrated  to  Missouri  and, 
because  of  ill  health,  moved  from  Missouri  to  Iowa  and,  at  the  time  of  his 
arrival  in  Iowa,  had  only  aboul  fifty  cents.  In  the  spring  of  1S74  he  came 
to  Eagle  Lake  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  and  homesteaded  one  hundred 
and  si\t\  acres  of  land,  to  which  he  added  until  he  owned  two  hundred 
and  forty  acres  before  his  death.  He  had  a  hard  struggle  to  make  a  suc- 
cess in  life,  but  he  did  succeed  in  a  large  measure  and,  at  his  death,  left  his 
family  well  provided  with  all  of  the  comforts  of  life.  Andrew  and  Cagse 
Peterson  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  Andrew  A..  John.  Peter.  Magnus 
and  Daniel.  The  late  Andrew  Peterson  was  a  member  of  the  Swedish 
Lutheran  church,  and   was  identified   with  the   Republican   party. 

Andrew  \.  Peterson  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Eagle 
lake  township  and,  until  he  was  twenty-three  years  old,  was  employed  on 
his  father's  farm.  In  1 SS ;  he  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land, 
where  he  now  lives  and.  the  next  year,  moved  to  the  farm.  Mr.  Peterson  is 
engaged  in  general  farming  and  stock  raising.  Most  of  the  improvements 
which  are  to  be  seen  on  the  farm  today  have  been  put  here  by  Mr.  Peter- 
son's own  hand.  lie  iris  erected  all  of  the  buildings  and  practically  all  of 
the  fences  and  installed  most  of  the  drainage. 

In  1883  \11.lrew  V  Peterson  was  married  to  Kate  Peterson,  and  to 
them   have  been   born    four  children,    Alvin   J..   Oscar    I...    Vide   and    Phoebe. 

Mr.    Peterson    has    departed    somewhat    from    the    political    wavs   of    his 


298  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

father.  Andrew  A.  Peterson  is  identified  with  the  Democratic  party,  while 
his  father  was  a  Republican.  Mr.  Peterson  has  served  as  chairman  of  the 
township  board  as  supervisor  and  as  constable.  The  Peterson  family  are 
members  of  the  Swedish  1  utheran  church. 

Andrew  A.  Peterson  is  one  <>\  the  most  hustling  farmers  of  Otter  Tail 
count)  and  has  ,1  variety  of  interests  aside  from  his  farm.  He  is  a  director 
in  the  Battle  Lake  Telephone  Company,  a  director  in  the  Melby  State  Bank, 
a  director  in  the  .\lelh\  Farmers  Elevator  and  a  director  in  the  Melby  Live 
Stock  Shipping  Association.  All  of  these  various  interests  demand  a  great 
deal  of  his  time,  lie  is  a  man  of  engaging  personality  and  extremely  popu- 
lar in  the  countv  where  he  lives. 


OLE  O.  AUNE. 


Among  the  self-made  citizens  of  Sverdrup  township,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  and  among  its  successful  farmers,  is  Ole  O.  Aune,  who  was  born 
on  December  11,  1836,  in  Norway,  the  son  of  Ole  O.  Aune,  Sr.,  who  lived 
and  died  in  bis  native  land. 

Air.  Aune  was  educated  in  Norway  and  immigrated  to  La  Crosse,  Wis- 
consin, in  [869.  Prior  to  coming  to  America,  be  had  been  engaged  in  ship- 
building in  bis  native  land.  After  coming  to  this  country  be  worked  on  the 
railroad  in  Huston  county.  Wisconsin,  for  a  time  and  then  went  to  Eau 
( 'laire.  Wisconsin,  where  he  worked  in  a  saw-mill.  Later  be  worked  in  the 
pine  regions  of  Wisconsin  and.  during  the  summer  of  1S70.  worked  in  the 
mills  on  the  river,  fie  was  taken  sick  in  the  fall  of  1870  and  in  February 
of  the  following  year,  returned  to  work  in  the  mills.  Tn  May,  1871,  Mr. 
Aune  set  out  for  Minnesota.  One  of  his  companions  purchased  an  ox  team 
at  St.  Peter,  Minnesota,  and  met  Mr.  Aune  at  Willmar,  Minnesota,  from 
which  place  the  two  made  the  trip  to  Fort  Abercrombie,  North  Dakota.  They 
moved  to  a  place  called  Georgetown  and  then  turned  east  and  followed  the 
Buffalo  river  in  where  the  city  of  I  law  ley  now  stands.  Here  they  built  a 
In-'  cabin,  shortly  after  June.  1  S~  1 .  \  iter  remaining  at  this  place  until  the 
spring  of  [872  the)  came  to  Fergus  Falls,  which  at  that  time  was  ;i  small 
\  illage. 

Shortly  afterward,  Mr.  Aune  located  on  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
forty-four  acres,  where  he  now  lives.  During  the  next  few  years,  he  was 
busil)  engaged  in  clearing  the  land  and  in  making  miscellaneous  improve- 
ments. Tie  is  a  general  farmer  and  stockman  ami,  in  addition  to  bis  farm- 
ing interests,  own-  stork  in  the  elevator  and  in  a  store  and  creamery  at 
I  biderwood. 

Tn  [888,  Ole  O.  Mine  returned  to  Norway  and  was  there  married  to 
Gertrude  Halgunset,  who  was  born  on  January  12,  1800,  in  Norway,     They 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  299 

have  been  the  parents  of  two  sons,  Ole  O.,  Jr.,  who  was  born  on  May  26, 
1890,  and  who  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Otter  Tail  county,  is  a  farmer 
and  lives  at  home  with  his  parents,  and  John  O.,  born  on  November  30, 
1893,  was  also  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  lives  at  home  on  the  farm. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ole  O.  Aune,  Sr.,  are  Lutherans.  Mr.  Anne  is  a  Repub- 
lican in  politics,  but  in  late  years  has  not  been  especially  interested  in  politics 
and  has  taken  no  part  in  it.  He  is  a  good  farmer  and  has  been  successful 
as  a  result  of  his  own  personal  effort. 


TOHN  T.  WOLD. 


John  J.  Wold.,  a  well-to-do  fanner  and  business  man  of  Sverdrup  town- 
ship, Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Norway,  January  28,  1854. 
Mr.  Wold  is  a  son  of  Jens  and  Johanna  (Swenson)  Wold,  both  of  whom 
were  natives  of  Norway.  Mr.  Wold's  father  was  born  in  1820,  and  his 
mother  in  the  same  year.  They  were  married  in  Norway,  and  in  1868  they 
emigrated  to  America,  locating  first  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota.  In 
1872  they  made  the  journey  by  ox  team  from  Goodhue  to  Otter  Tail  county. 
Here  they  homesteaded  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  where  their 
son.  John  J.,  now  lives.  They  cleared  and  improved  this  farm  and  made  it 
their  home  the  rest  of  their  lives.  Mr.  Wold's  father  died  in  1891,  and  his 
mother  in  1903.  They  were  earnest  and  devoted  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church,  and  were  active  in  religious  matters  in  this  township  in  the  early 
days.  Of  the  six  children  horn  to  Jens  Wold  and  wife,  Edward,  the  eldest, 
is  deceased.  The  other  children  in  the  order  of  their  birth  are  as  follow: 
Sophia,  John  J..  Elizabeth.  Ole  and  Theodore,  all  of  whom  are  living. 

John  J.  Wold  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Norway, 
and  also  attended  the  schools  in  Goodhue  county,  Minnesota,  after  coming 
to  this  country.  When  Mr.  Wold  was  eighteen  years  of  age,  he  came  to 
Sverdrup  township.  Otter  Tail  county,  with  his  parents,  and  has  lived  con- 
tinuously upon  the  farm  where  he  now  resides  since  coming  to  the  county. 
After  his  father's  death,  in  1891,  John  J.  Wold  purchased  the  old  home- 
stead farm,  and  built  thereon  a  fine  residence.  He  has  also  made  many 
other  substantial  improvements  on  the  farm  and  now  has  one  <<i  the  most 
desirable  tracts  of  land  in  this  pari  of  Otter  Tail  county.  He  is  a  general 
farmer  and  stockman. 

On  November  30,  180-'.  John  I.  Wold  was  married  to  Karen  Thronson, 
who  was  born  in  Norway,  November  15,  1864,  and  whose  parent-  never 
left  their  native  land.  To  this  union  have  been  horn  three  children  ;  Edwin, 
born  on  August  35,  1893,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  lives  at 
home  with  his  parents;  Clara  Gelcna.  horn  on  February  o.  [897,  wa 
student  in  the  public  schools  of  her  home-  township,  and   is  living   at   home; 


300  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

i  on  May  20,  11)04,  is  a  student  in  the  schools  of 


rgaret 

T< 

ihanna 

ie  t<>\\ 
Mr. 

us 
W 

hip. 

old  is 

stockholder  in  the  Underwood  Co-operative  Creamery 
Company,  and  in  the  co-operative  mercantile  store  at  Underwood,  as  well 
as  the  Farmers  Elevator  and  Shipping  Association,  at  Underwood. 

Politically,  Mr.  Wold  is  identified  with  the  Prohibition  party.  He  lias 
served  as  supervisor  of  Sverdrup  township,  and  as  treasurer  of  the  school 
hoard  for  seventeen  years.  Air.  and  Airs.  John  J.  Wold  and  family  are  all 
very  active  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  in  this  township.  They  are 
substantial  and  successful  farmers,  and  well-known  and  valued  citizens. 


DAVID  L 

.   ROWE. 

I)a\ 

Hi    1..    R 

owe. 

who 

is   well-km 

iwn    in    L\ 

erts 

towns 

hip,    Otter    Tail 

countv. 

Minnesot 

1    nulls    a 

a.    as 

a    successful    farmer   and 
lid   farm  of  two  hundred 

1  ireec 

and 

ler   of 
forty 

HoLtein 
acres  loca 

cattle 

and  win 

splen, 

ted  in 

sections 

0  and    ic 

1.   is  a 

nat 

ive  ■'[   Korv 

ray,    where 

he  was  born  on  Fel 

►ruary 

10.  1  s.i,1-; 

Mr. 

Howe  is 

the  si 

>n  0 

f  Lars  and 

Kari   1  Groethe  1 

Rowe 

,  both  of 

whom 

were   bo 

rn   in    No 

rway, 

the 

former  in 

1814  and 

the 

latter 

in    181 5. 

The> 

came  10 

1  lodge  0' 

Hint}'. 

Wi 

sconsin,  in 

[852,  and 

three 

years 

later  moved  to 

Portage  county,  Wisconsin.  Later  the)  moved  t<>  Waupaca  county  and  pur- 
chased a  farm  of  eight)  acres,  to  which  they  added  fort)-  acres.  Mr.  Rowe's 
father  died  in  Waupaca  count)-  in  [892  and  his  wife  in  [898.  They  were 
the  parents  of  three  children.  David  I...  \ndrew  L.  and  Olena.  Mr.  Lowe's 
mother  had  been  previously  married  and  by  this  first  marriage,  had  three 
children,  \~els,  Susan  and  Kisti.  The  Rowes  left  Bergen.  Norway,  on  May 
T7.   1852.  and  were  ten  weeks  on  the  voyage  from  Norway  to  America. 

David  L.  Rowe  was  four  years  old  when  the  family  arrived  in  Wis- 
consin  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  that  state  and,  when 
twenty-five  years  old.  in  1873.  moved  to  Mower  count)-.  Minnesota,  where 
In-  acquired  a  farm  and  where  he  lived  until  IQ03,  when  he  moved  to  South 
Dakota.  After  living  in  South  Dakota  for  eight  years.  Mr.  Rowe  immi- 
grated to  Otter  Tail  county  and  purchased  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  forty 
acres  in  sections  o  and  01,  Everts  township,  lie  is  a  general  farmer  and 
stock  man  and  a  breeder  of  llolstein  cattle. 

In  1877  Mr.  Rowe  was  married  in  Mower  count)-.  Minnesota,  to  Kisti 
Monson,  who  was  horn  mi  January  13.  1851.  in  Norway,  and  who  is  the 
daughter  of  Mons  <  ).  ami  Kari  (Tomjum)  Monson.  Mrs.  Lowe's  parents 
came  to  Wisconsin  in  1801,  hut  the  same  year  immigrated  to  Union  count). 
South  Dakota.  From  Union  county,  the  family  traveled  overland  by  ox 
tram  to   |,,wa.      Later  thev  settled  in   Mower  countv.   Minnesota,  purchasing 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,     MINNESOTA.  30I 

one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  where  Mrs.  Rowe's  father  died.  Her 
brother  later  sold  the  farm  and  moved  to  Union  county,  South  Dakota,  and 
now  owns  die  farm  which  his  father  had  owned  in  that  county.  Airs. 
Rowe's  mother  died  in  Smith  Dakota  in   1906. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  L.  Rowe  have  been  the  parents  of  eight  children. 
Lars,  who  is  deceased;  Clara,  who  is  the  wife  of  Leif  Swennumson  and  has 
three  children,  Francis,  David  and  Robert;  Matthew,  who  was  burn  on 
September  29,  1881,  in  Mitchell  county.  Iowa,  where  his  parents  lived  for 
three  years,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  is  now  a  farmer,  living 
at  home  with  his  parents;  Lawrence,  born  on  April  14,  1883,  in  Mitchell 
county,  Iowa,  was  also  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  the  Leroy  high 
school  and  immigrated  t<>  Hettinger  count}'.  North.  Dakota,  where  he  took 
up  a  claim  and  farmed  for  two  years,  now  being  clerk  of  Everts  township, 
to  which  office  he  was  elected  in  1013;  Olene,  who  is  the  wife  of  Raymond 
Hendrix,  of  Elk  Point,  South  Dakota,  has  two  children,  Margaret  and 
Raiman  Rowe;  Norman,  who  lives  at  Devon,  Montana,  has  a  claim  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  that  state  and  is  unmarried;  Carl  Edward,  who 
died  at  the  age  of  three  vears,  and  Esther,  who  lives  at  home. 


DLL  BERG 


(  He  Berg,  a  very  successful  farmer,  who  owns  two  hundred  acres  of 
land  in  Compton  township,  besides  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Canada, 
is  a  native  of  Sweden,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  that  country  on  June  0. 
[856. 

Mr.  Berg's  parents  were  Ole  Olson  and  Margaret  Anderson,  both  natives 
of  Sweden.  His  grandfather  was  Ole  Anderson,  a  farmer  by  occupation 
and  a  prominent  member  of  the  Lutheran  church  in  his  native  country.  In 
1887  Ole  Olson  came  to  America,  and  after  landing  at  Halifax,  came  direct 
to  Otter  Tail  county.  Minnesota.  Here  he  purchased  one  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  of  land  in  sections  23  and  28.  of  Compton  township,  and  took 
up  farming.  He  is  now  living  with  bis  son,  Ole  Berg,  at  the  advanced  age 
of  eighty-nine  war-.  His  wife  died  some  years  ago.  He  is  a  devout  mem- 
ber of  the  Lutheran  church,  and  in  politics  is  a   Republican. 

Ole  P>er>;\  the  only  child  of  his  parents  who  grew  to  maturity,  was  edu- 
cated in  the  schools  of  Compton  township,  and  when  old  enough  took  up 
farming  on  hi-  father's  place,  ami  in  this  vocation  has  been  verj  successful, 
and   besides  having  a   splendid    farm,   it    is   improved   to   I  he   minutest    detail 

The   buildings    are   all    well    painted    and    are   kept    in    a   g 1    state   of    repair. 

In    km  1    Mr.    Berg  built  a  barn  sixty  by  thirty-two   feet. 

In  1885  <  )le  Berg  was  married  t"  Maggie  Anderson,  and  to  tin-  union 
have  been   burn    four  children,   Maggie,    \nie.    Andrew    and  Charles,   all   of 


302  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

whom  are  unmarried  and  who  live  at  home  with  their  parents.  Mr.  Berg 
and  family  are  earnest  and  faithful  members  of  the  Lutheran  church,  and 
for  many  years  have  been  active  in  church  work.  For  the  past  five  years 
Air.  Berg  has  been  treasurer  of  the  local  congregation.  Aside  from  his 
interests  in  his  church,  Mr.  Berg's  whole  interests  are  centered  in  his  family 
and  in  hi-  farm.      He  has  a  host  of  friends  in  this  neighborhood. 


CHARLEY  EKLUND. 


Charley  Eklund,  another  well  known  and  enterprising  farmer  of  Nidaros 
township.  Otter  Tail  count}',  Minnesota,  is  a  native  of  Sweden,  where  he 
was  born  on  July  7.  1864. 

Mr.  Eklund  is  the  son  of  Ole  and  Hannah  (Johnson)  Eklund,  both  of 
whom  were  born  in  Sweden.  Mr.  Eklund' s  father  was  born  on  January  22, 
1836,  and  his  mother  on  July  [9,-1834.  They  were  married  in  Sweden  and, 
after  some  years,  Mr.  Eklund' s  father  came  to  America,  settling  at  Litch- 
field in  iS6;>.  The  family  came  to  America  the  next  year  and  settled  with 
the  father  at  Litchfield.  In  the  fall  of  1870,  the  family  moved  to  Clitherall 
township,  Otter  Tail  county,  settling  on  a  homestead  farm  in  section  32. 
This  farm  had  been  pre-empted  in  [868.  Mr.  Eklund's  father  improved 
the  land  and  erected  excellent  buildings.  He  died  on  the  farm  on  March 
1 1.  1910,  and  his  widow  is  still  living  on  the  old  homestead.  He  was  one  of 
the  first  members  of  the  Swedish  Lutheran  church,  known  as  the  Eagle  Lake 
church.  By  his  marriage  to  Hannah  Jsakson,  there  were  born  seven  chil- 
dren, erne  df  whom,  Elizabeth,  is  deceased.  The  living  children  are,  John. 
Charley,  the  subject  of  this  sketch.  Inga,  Sophia,  Helnia  and  Otto.  The 
last  named  lives  on  the  old  homestead. 

Charley  Eklund  was  five  years  old  when  he  accompanied  his  mother  and 
the  remainder  of  the  family  to  America.  He  lived  with  his  parents  and 
attended  the  public  schools  for  a  number  of  years,  after  which  he  took  up 
farming.  From  his  father,  who  had  purchased  four  hundred  acres  of  rail- 
road land  in  Nidaros  township,  .Mr.  Eklund  obtained  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  section  [9,  and  has  since  added  to  that  original  farm  until  he  now 
owns  two  hundred  and  forty  acres.  He  .also  owns  forty  acres  in  section  20. 
Mr.  Eklund  has  forty-five  acres  in  Clitherall  township.  In  1885  he  moved 
l<i  the  farm  located  in  section  [9,  where  he  now  lives.  He  has  a  splendid 
home  situated  in  a  pretty  grove  and  all  of  the  buildings  on  this  farm  are 
thoroughly  modern.  Mr.  Eklund  is  a  general  farmer  and  stockman.  When 
tin-  family  moved  to  *  >tter  Tail  county  from  Benson,  Minnesota,  the  trip  was 
made  with  an  OX  team  and  immediately  upon  their  arrival,  a  sod  house  was 
built.  for  some  time  the  family  lived  in  this  house,  which  had  only  a  clay 
floor. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  3O3 

On  September  6,  1885,  Charley  Eklund  was  married  to  Emma  John- 
son, who  was  born  in  Sweden,  September  6,  1865,  and  who  is  the  daughter 
of  Carl  Peter  and  Christine  (Johnson)  Johnson.  Mrs.  Eklund's  parents 
were  both  born  in  Sweden,  her  father  on  July  27,  1839,  and  her  mother  on 
August  _'4,  1844.  They  came  to  Meeker  county,  Minnesota,  in  1870,  and 
the  next  year  moved  to  Otter  Tail  county,  making"  the  journey  with  an  ox 
team.  They  took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Leaf 
Mountain  township  and  here  Mrs.  Eklund's  father  died  on  February  3,  1890. 
Her  mother  is  still  living.  They  were  the  parents  of  fourteen  children, 
Emma  Xatolia,  Hilda  Ulrike,  deceased;  Elof  William,  Janni  Amanda,  Hen- 
rick  Wicter,  Hilma  Ullrika,  Ida  Theresa,  deceased;  Anton  Frittjof,  Addvingd 
Wilton,  Alma  Victoria,  Elena  Alvia,  Clifford  Livingston,  Hatfield  and  Cora 
Saraphena. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charley  Eklund  have  seven  children,  Alma  Liventina; 
Florence  Georginia,  the  wife  of  William  Denoon,  has  one  child,  Kenneth 
Eklund  Denoon;  Edith  Hafire;  Lydia  Elizabeth;  Willie  Luther  Natanael; 
Mardel  Adina,  and  Judith  Eleanora. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Eklund  and  family  belong  to  the  Eagle  Lake  Swedish 
Lutheran  church.  Air.  Eklund  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  school  board 
in  Nidaros  township  and  has  been  otherwise  prominent  in  local  affairs.  He 
has  a  host  of  friends  in  the  township  where  he  lives. 


ERICK  E.  BOEN. 


One  of  the  elder  citizens  and  one  of  the  highly  respected  farmers  of 
Aurdal  township,  Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  is  Erick  E.  Boen,  who  was 
born  on  October  13,  1853,  in  Norway. 

Mr.  Boen  is  the  son  of  Erick  T.  and  fngeborg  (  Bjorgo)  Boen.  who 
were  natives  of  Norway  and  who,  after  coming  to  America,  homesteaded 
eight}'  acres  of  land  in  section  27,  of  Aurdal  township.  Mr.  Boen's  father- 
died  in  1896  and  his  mother  three  years  previously  in  1893.  They  had  a 
family  of  nine  children,  three  of  the  suns  are  living  and  three  of  the  daughters. 

Erick  E.  Boen  was  educated  in  Norway.  Upon  his  arrival  in  America 
in  1868,  he  settled  in  Moore  county,  Minnesota,  but  on  October  13,  1871. 
came  to  Fergus  Falls,  Minnesota,  and,  for  a  year,  was  engaged  in  trapping 
and  shooting.  Mr.  Boen  did  not  enjoy  the  assistance  of  wealthy  relatives 
or  influential  friends,  but  has  made  his  own  way  in  the  world.  Tn  [873  he 
bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  internal  improvement  land  in  this 
county  and  it  is  upon  this  farm  that  Mr.  Boen  now  lives.  He  has  cleared 
the  land  and  erected  very  fine  buildings  upon  it. 

In  1878  Erick  E.  Boen  was  married  to  Christina  Halverson,  who  was 
born  in  1800  in  Wisconsin  and  who  is  the  daughter  of  Gutron  and  Christie 


304  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Halverson,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway.  Mrs.  Boen's  parents 
came  to  America  in  the  early  fifties.  In  1871  they  homesteaded  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  of  land.  Mrs.  Boen's  father  died  at  the  age  of  seventy- 
three  years,  but  her  mother  lived  to  be  ninety-four  and  one-half  years  old. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Erick  E.  Boen  have  been  the  parents  of  eight  children, 
as  follow:  Edith,  the  wife  of  Sigval  Johnson:  Clara;  Ida,  the  wife  of  John 
Helden;  Anne,  who  died  in  infancy;  one  who  died  unnamed;  Edmund,  who 
lives  at  home  with  his  parents;  Gustav,  who  married  Ida  Onstad,  of  Sver- 
drup  township,  and  Mabel,  who  lives  at  home. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Boen  and  family  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 
Mr.  Boen  has  held  practically  all  of  the  township  offices  except  that  of 
justice  of  the  peace  and  township  clerk. 


JORGEN  G.  VIGEN,  M.   I). 

The  scion  of  a  distinguished  Norwegian  family,  Dr.  Jorgen  G.  \  igen, 
1-  a  well-known  and  successful  physician  of  long  standing  at  Fergus  Falls, 
this  county.  Fie  was  horn  on  September  jo,  1864,  at  Selbu,  Trondhjem, 
Norway,  a  picturesque  town  situated  on  Lake  Selbu,  which  is  twenty  miles 
in  length  and  seven  and  one-half  miles  long.  There  is  a  small  island  in  the 
lake  composed  mostly  of  towering  rocks  and  an  old  fort,  where  King  Sverre 
and  his  followers  were  wont  to  defend  themselves  one  thousand  years  ago 
from  his  enemies.  It  was  within  a  stone's  throw  of  this  historic  old  battle- 
ment that  Doctor  Vigen  was  born.  I  lis  parents.  (, under  and  Sigrid  (Gul- 
seth)  Vigen,  were  natives  of  Norway,  both  members  of  old  and  prominent 
families  there.  Doctor  Vigen's  grandmother's  brother,  Mr.  Norby,  was  a 
distinguished  citizen  of  Norway  many  years  ago.  lie  was  a  member  of  the 
Storthing,   which  is  the  highest   legislative  body   in   the  country. 

In  [869  Jorgen  ( i.  Vigen,  being  then  four  years  of  age,  came  with  his 
parents  to  America,  the  journey  being  made  via  Quebec.  The  family  settled 
at  VVanamingo,  in  Goodhue  county,  this  state,  where  the  father  purchased 
forty  acres  of  land  and  engaged  in  farming  until  [883,  in  which  year  he 
moved  to  New  Solum,  in  Marshall  count)-,  and  there  be  homesteaded  one 
hundred  and  si\t\  acres  and  lived  until  his  wife  ami  daughter  died,  after 
which  he  rented  the  home  farm  and  retired  from  the  active  life  of  the  farm. 

Educated  in  the  Red  Wing  Seminary  at  Red  Wing.  Minnesota,  Jorgen 
(i.  Vigen  later  attended  the  high  school  at  St.  Paul  and  was  graduated  with 
the  class  of  1891.  Subsequently,  be  took  a  medical  course  of  three  years 
al  the  Universit)  of  Minnesota  and  was  graduated  in  [894.  After  serving 
as  an  interne  for  one  year  in  the  city  hospital  in  St.  Paul,  he  went  to  Daw- 
son, Lac  qui  Parle  count}-,  this  state,  and  there  began  the  practice  of  medi- 
cine.    The  field,  however,  was  too  small  and  the  chances   for  advancement 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  305 

were  too  uncertain  and  in  July,  1896,  Doctor  Vigen  located  at  Fergus  Falls, 
this  county,  where  he  is  still  engaged  in  the  active  practice  of  his  profession 
and  where  he  has  built  up  a  lucrative  business.  One  of  the  honors  which 
the  people  of  Otter  Tail  county  have  bestowed  upon  Doctor  Vigen  is  that 
of  coroner  of  the  county,  in  which  office  he  is  serving  his  third  term.  He 
also  was  city  physician  and  health  officer  for  several  years. 

By  his  marriage  to  Martha  Bartelson.  the  daughter  of  Gunder  and 
Bertha  Bartelson,  Doctor  Vigen  has  two  children,  Harold  D.  and  James  H. 
both  of  whom  live  at  home  with  their  parents. 

Dr.  Vigen  is  a  member  of  the  Park  Region  Medical  Society,  the  Minne- 
sota State  Medical  Association  and  the  American  Medical  Association. 
Doctor  Vigen  not  only  was  well  trained  for  his  profession,  but  he  has  ever 
since  his  college  days  been  a  deep  and  thoughtful  student  of  the  latest 
developments  in  medicine  and  surgery,  among  his  post-graduate  studies  hav- 
ing been  a  course  of  five  months  in  the  great  medical  school  at  Berlin,  where 
he  studied  diseases  of  the  stomach  and  intestines,  and  this,  in  a  large  meas- 
ure, accounts  for  his  splendid  success.  He  is  also  a  man  of  pleasing  and 
agreeable  personality  and  is  popular  not  only  as  a  physician,  but  as  a  man 
among  his  fellow  townsmen. 


ANDREW  TWETEN. 


Andrew  Tweten,  a  successful  farmer  and  stock  man  of  Everts  town- 
ship, Otter  Tail  county,  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Dane  county,  Wisconsin, 
September  12,  i860.  Mr.  Tweten  is  a  son  of  Ole  and  Karen  Tweten,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway,  the  former  born  in  1812.  Mr.  Tweten's 
father  came  to  America  and  settled  in  Dane  county,  Wisconsin,  in  1839 
The  voyage  occupied  eighteen  weeks  from  Norway  to  America,  coming  over 
in  one  of  the  old-fashioned  sailing  vessels.  He  was  married  in  Dane  county, 
Wisconsin,  and  there  his  wife  died  in  1870,  at  the  age  of  about  forty  years, 
leaving  seven  children.  Julia,  Ole,  Kare,  deceased;  Engbret,  Andrew,  Erick 
and  Johannes.  In  1874  the  family  moved  to  Everts  township,  Otter  Tail 
county,  and  purchased  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  eighty-three  aero,  and 
here  Mr.  Tweten's  father  died  on  January  7,  1900. 

Andrew  Tweten  was  reared  on  his  father's  old  homestead  farm  in  Dane 
county,  Wisconsin,  and  on  the  farm  in  Otter  Tail  county.  He  remained 
with  his  father  on  the  old  home  farm  until  his  marriage  in  1887.  and  now 
owns  the  old  farm. 

In  1SS7  Mr.  Tweten  was  married  to  Sena  Ledel,  who  was  born  in  1869 
in  Dane  county.  Wisconsin,  and  who  is  a  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  Ledel, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway  and  early  settlers  in  Dane  county. 
,20b") 


306  OTTER  TAN.  COUNTY,  MINNESOTA. 

Wisconsin.  Subsequently,  however,  they  emigrated  to  Everts  township, 
Otter  Tail  county,  where  Mrs.  Tweten's  father  died  in  1915,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-eight  years.  Airs.  Tweten's  mother  died  in  Everts  township  several 
years  ago. 

Andrew  Tweten  and  wife  are  the  parents  of  eight  children  as  follow: 
Ando,  who  lives  at  home;  Olger  J.,  Thorfin,  Warner.  Cora.  Geneva,  Lillian 
and  Irene. 

Mr.  Tweten  and  his  family  are  all  earnest  and  faithful  members  of  the 
Lutheran  church.  Mr.  Tweten  has  never  been  active  in  politics,  but  has 
devoted  his  energies  and  his  time  rather  to  his  chosen  vocation,  in  which 
he  has  been  very  successful. 


BENJAMIN  F.  YOUNG. 

Prominent  as  a  farmer  and  dairyman  in  Henning,  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  was  Benjamin  F.  Young,  a  well-known  citizen  of  the  township 
and  a  native  of  Sibley  county,  Minnesota,  where  he  was  born  on  December 
10,  1S57.  Mr.  Young  was  the  son  of  Benjamin  L.,  Sr.,  and  Polly  1  Snyder) 
Young. 

Mr.  Young's  parents  were  both  natives  of  Pennsylvania,  his  father 
being  born  on  August  -'4.  1830.  His  parents  came  to  Sibley  county.  Minne- 
sota, in  1855,  and  a  little  while  thereafter  pre-empted  one  hundred  and 
sixty  .acres  of  land.  There  Mr.  Young's  father  now  resides.  His  wife 
died  on  \]iril  3,  1015.  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years.  They  were  the  par- 
ents of  eight  children,  of  whom  four,  John  Quincy,  the  eldest,  Ella,  Benjamin 
F.  and  Emma,  are  deceased.  The  other  children  are  Harry,  Charles,  Anna 
and  William. 

Benjamin  !•'.  Young  was  reared  in  Sibley  county.  Minnesota,  except 
four  years  which  he  spent  in  Pennsylvania,  where  his  parents  lived  before 
they  moved  to  Minnesota.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  this 
state  and  was  always  engaged  in  farming.  On  May  28,  r88o,  Mr.  Young 
came  to  Henning  township  and  took  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  twenty 
acres  of  land  in  section  6  He  subsequently  added  forty  acre--  to  the  farm 
and  in  all  owned  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  Mr.  Young  made  a  specialty 
of  keeping  dairy  cattle  and  had  about  twenty  head  of  cows.  He  was  also 
a  general   farmer  and  stockman. 

On  January  17.  [882,  Benjamin  F.  Young  was  married  to  Mary  E. 
Bi  He-,  who  was  born  in  the  state  of  Wisconsin  on  May  ,^.  1863,  and  who 
is  the  daughter  of  William  and  Martha  Bones.  They  came  from  Wiscon- 
sin to  Sibley  county,  Minnesota,  and  both  died  in  this  county.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.   Benjamin   F.   Young  were  the  parents  of  six  children,  of  whom  one. 


OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA.  3O7 

an  infant  daughter,  is  deceased.  The  living  children  are,  William,  Laura, 
Lester,  Jesse  and  Walter. 

Mr.  Young  had  a  well-improved  and  fertile  farm.  He  erected  all  of 
the  buildings  which' now  stand  on  the  farm  and  they  are  kept  well  painted 
and  in  first-class  state  of  repair.  He  was  a  progressive  citizen  who  believed 
in  enjoying  all  of  the  comforts  which  are  available  to  people  who  live  in  the 
country. 

Benjamin  F.  Young  was  clerk  of  the  local  school  board.  Although  he 
never  took  an  active  part  in  politics  and  never  aspired  to  political  office,  he 
was  a  man  of  wide  influence  in  the  community  where  he  lived,  and  especially 
in  matters  pertaining  to  agriculture.  He  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  a  host 
of  friends  in  his  home  neighborhood.  Benjamin  F.  Young  died  suddenly 
of  apoplexy,  on  August  12,  1915. 


LARS  OLSON. 


bar-  Olson,  a  prosperous  farmer  of  Henning  township.  Otter  Tail 
county,  Minnesota,  was  born  in  Olmstead  county,  Minnesota,  June  1,  1858. 
He  is  a  son  of  Ole  and  Kari  Olson,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Norway, 
the  former  of  whom  was  born  on  November  16,  1816,  and  the  latter  born 
August  14,  1S21.  Mr.  Olson's  parents  came  to  the  United  States  from 
Norway  in  1847,  locating  first  in  Wisconsin.  Later  they  moved  to  Iowa, 
and  in  1855  came  to  Olmstead  county,  Minnesota,  where  they  homesteaded 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land.  On  this  land  more  than  three  hundred 
Indians  were  at  one  time  encamped.  They  gradually  added  to  this  original 
tract  until  at  one  time  the  family  had  more  than  two  hundred  acres  of  land, 
ami  it  was  on  this  farm  that  Mr.  Olson's  father  died  on  September  20,  1899. 
His  mother  had  passed  away  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  centurv  previously. 
August  3.  1872.  Ole  Olson  and  wife  were  the  parents  of  seven  children, 
of  whom  only  three,  Thomas,  Olaus  and  Lars,  are  living.  The  deceased 
children  are  Ingeborg,  Halvor,  Helge  and  Helena. 

Lars  Olson  received  his  education  principally  in  the  schools  of  Olmstead 
county,  Minnesota,  and  for  a  time  was  a  student  in  the  Benson  high  school, 
and  also  spent  one  term  at  St.  Olaf's  College,  Northfield,  Minnesota.  He 
was  reared  to  the  life  of  a  farmer,  and  in  1884  came  to  Otter  Tail  county, 
purchasing  fort)  acres  of  land  in  section  17,  of  Henning  township.  At  this 
tini'-  he  also  owned  an  eighty-acre  farm  in  section  [9  of  the  same  township, 
lie  disposed  of  this  land,  however,  and  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  Folden  township,  hut  for  the  past  seven  years  has  lived  in  Henning 
township  on  a  farm  which  is  situated  in  section   17. 

On  April  10.  1887.  Lars  Olson  was  married  to  Carrie  Grovdal,  who 
was  horn   in   Norway  in    r866,   and    who   1.   a   daughter  of    Hans   and   Anne 


308  OTTER    TAIL    COUNTY,    MINNESOTA. 

Grovdal.  Mrs.  Olson's  parents  came  to  Dodge  county,  Minnesota,  in  1876, 
and  here  her  father  died  in  1895,  while  her  mother  died  in  Otter  Tail 
county  three  years  later  in  1898. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lars  Olson  are  the  parents  of  seven  children,  of  whom 
one,  Lawrence,  is  deceased.  The  living  children  are  Oscar,  Carl,  Emma, 
Harris.  Edwin  and  Lillian. 

Mr.  Olson  and  family  are  earnest  members  of  the  United  Lutheran 
church,  in  which  they  take  an  active  interest.  Mr.  Olson  has  served  his 
township  as  assessor  for  seven  years,  holding  that  important  office  at  the 
present  time. 


ORRIN  H.  VARGASON. 


Orrin  H.  Vargason,  who  is  a  native  of  Iowa,  but  who  owns  a  splendid 
farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Inman  township.  Otter  Tail  county, 
Minnesota,  was  born  on  June  19,  1883. 

Mr.  Vargason  is  the  son  of  Charles  H.  and  Orena  ( Curtis)  Vargason, 
both  of  whom  are  natives  of  Iowa.  Charles  H.  Vargason  was  born  in 
Buchanan  county,  Iowa.  May  28,  1859,  and  his  wife,  who  before  her  mar- 
riage, was  Orena  Curtis,  was  born  in  Buchanan  count}-,  Iowa,  March  3. 
1865.     They  were  married  on  June  17,   1882. 

Charles  H.  Vargason  was  the  son  of  Charles  Vargason,  a  native  of 
Towanda,  Bradford  county,  Pennsylvania,  ami  the  latter  was  born  on 
May  27,  1836.  He  was  married  to  Cordelia  Merrill,  a  native  of  Xew  Vork 
state,  who  was  born  on  June  14,  1838.  She  was  a  daughter  of  R.  G.  Mer- 
rill, who  was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  War,  a  member  of  the  Third  Iowa  Cavalry 
and  who  owned  a  farm  of  eight}-  acres  in  Buchanan  county.  Iowa.  R.  G. 
Merrill,  after  serving  about  one  year  in  the  army,  returned  to  his  home, 
was  taken  ill  and  died  shortly  afterwards.  Charles  Vargason  was  the  son 
of  Hiram  Vargason,  a  native  of  Towanda.  Pennsylvania.  Hiram  Vargason 
was  the  son  of  Henry  Vargason,  a  native  of  Wales,  who.  after  coming  to 
America,  settled  in  Pennsylvania  and  later  moved  to  Iowa.  Hiram  Varga- 
son was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  an  active  anti-slavery  advocate.  He  mar- 
ried Elizabeth  Dalton,  and,  after  his  marriage,  farmed  in  Pennsylvania  for 
a  time  Later  he  moved  to  Michigan  and,  after  a  few  years'  residence  in 
that  stale,  moved  to  Wisconsin.  Still  later  he  moved  to  towa  and  settled 
in  Buchanan  county,  where  be  owned  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land. 
Charles  Vargason,  the  father  of  Charles  11.  and  the  grandfather  of 
Orrin  II..  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  and  was  a